The Things You Would Have Said: The Chance to Say What You Always Wanted Them to Know

The Things You Would Have Said: The Chance to Say What You Always Wanted Them to Know

5.0 2
by Jackie Hooper, Joyce Bean, Fred Stella
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Friends fall out of touch, we run out of time, or sometimes our courage simply fails us — and thank-yous, regrets, feelings, and secrets are left unshared. In 2009, Jackie Hooper came up with a way to help people recapture a moment that had once passed them by. She began asking them to write letters that answered one question: If you had another chance, what

Overview

Friends fall out of touch, we run out of time, or sometimes our courage simply fails us — and thank-yous, regrets, feelings, and secrets are left unshared. In 2009, Jackie Hooper came up with a way to help people recapture a moment that had once passed them by. She began asking them to write letters that answered one question: If you had another chance, what would you do differently?

Based on the popular blog The Things You Would Have Said, this captivating collection of letters presents the moving, surprising, and inspiring stories of ordinary people. From the everyday to the profound, at times heartwarming, funny, sad, and wise, these voices range across lifetimes and even across history: an indignant young boy urges his bully to become “a better man”; an old man thanks the woman who protected his family from Nazis during the Holocaust; the mother of a boy with autism atones for the times she picked on an autistic classmate back in high school.

Compelling, cathartic, and achingly honest, The Things You Would Have Said is a journey through the lives of people who have learned that there is always a second chance.

Editorial Reviews

Davy Rothbart
"Raw, revealing, intimate, and affecting, The Things You Would Have Said reminds us that our most profound personal struggles are universal." 
Chris Guillebeau
 "These heartfelt letters of hope, joy, pain, and despair combine to form a collective message: always choose love, and endeavor to live a life without regret. Can a single letter change your life? Yes—and this book is proof."
Karl Pillemer
"Jackie Hooper had a terrific idea: chronicle stories of important things left unsaid. The result is this poignant, humorous, and uplifting book. A fascinating read, it offers the motivation we all need to say what needs to be said — while our loved ones are around to hear it."
From the Publisher
"Raw, revealing, intimate, and affecting, The Things You Would Have Said reminds us that our most profound personal struggles are universal."  — Davy Rothbart, creator of Found magazine

 "These heartfelt letters of hope, joy, pain, and despair combine to form a collective message: always choose love, and endeavor to live a life without regret. Can a single letter change your life? Yes—and this book is proof." — Chris Guillebeau, author of The Art of Non-Conformity

"Jackie Hooper had a terrific idea: chronicle stories of important things left unsaid. The result is this poignant, humorous, and uplifting book. A fascinating read, it offers the motivation we all need to say what needs to be said — while our loved ones are around to hear it." — Karl Pillemer, author of 30 Lessons for Living

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781469263496
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Publication date:
03/26/2013
Edition description:
Unabridged
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 5.40(h) x 0.70(d)

What People are saying about this

Chris Guillebeau
These heartfelt letters of hope, joy, pain, and despair combine to form a collective message: always choose love, and endeavor to live a life without regret. Can a single letter change your life? Yes—and this book is proof. (Chris Guillebeau, author of The Art of Non-Conformity)
Andy Selsberg
Take heart as you read these letters—those who hurt you long ago are probably sorry. And it's never too late to put your own regrets out there. The US Postal Service may be struggling, but this collection shows how our need to set the record straight by writing letters is as vital as ever. (Andy Selsberg, author of Dear Old Love)
Karl Pillemer
Jackie Hooper had a terrific idea: chronicle stories of important things left unsaid. The result is this poignant, humorous, and uplifting book. A fascinating read, it offers the motivation we all need to say what needs to be said - while our loved one are around to hear it. (Karl Pillemer, author of 30 Lessons for Living)
Davy Rothbart
Raw, revealing, intimate, and affecting, The Things You Would Have Said reminds us that our most profound personal struggles are universal. (Davy Rothbart, creator of Found Magazine)

Meet the Author

Jackie Hooper is the creator of The Things You Would Have Said project and blog. She lives in Portland, Oregon. Visit www.wouldhavesaid.com.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Things You Would Have Said: The Chance to Say What You Always Wanted Them to Know 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Newconnexion More than 1 year ago
The Things You Would Have Said, Jackie Hooper, Hudson Street Press, 2012, $15 Sometimes it’s culture, timing, family dynamics or death that prevent us from saying what’s in our heart. So we’re left with "I wish I had told them" and sometimes painful regret. Author Jackie Hooper started a blog, inviting people to assuage their regret by writing letters to the people they wished they had spoken the words. This book contains more than 100 such letters. These letters will move you in many ways. Especially for those to the departed, they’re reminders that keeping things inside yourself just may mean that you'll never get a chance to say what you think and feel. One never knows what each day brings, so resolve to let the people in your life know how special they are to you. Writing letters can work through unresolved issues and help heal our sorrows and regrets, no matter how much time has passed.  New Connexion Journal — Alice R. Berntson
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Where's Despiar?"