Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism

Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism

4.2 63
by Temple Grandin
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0307739589

ISBN-13: 2900307739581

Pub. Date: 01/26/2010

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

In this unprecedented book, Grandin delivers a report from the country of autism. Writing from the dual perspectives of a scientist and an autistic person, she tells us how that country is experienced by its inhabitants and how she managed to breach its boundaries to function in the outside world. What emerges in Thinking in Pictures is the document of an

Overview

In this unprecedented book, Grandin delivers a report from the country of autism. Writing from the dual perspectives of a scientist and an autistic person, she tells us how that country is experienced by its inhabitants and how she managed to breach its boundaries to function in the outside world. What emerges in Thinking in Pictures is the document of an extraordinary human being, one who, in gracefully and lucidly bridging the gulf between her condition and our own, sheds light on the riddle of our common identity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900307739581
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/26/2010
Edition description:
Expanded, Tie-in Edition
Pages:
304

Table of Contents

Foreword11
1Thinking in Pictures: Autism and Visual Thought19
2The Great Continuum: Diagnosing Autism43
3The Squeeze Machine: Sensory Problems in Autism62
4Learning Empathy: Emotion and Autism82
5The Ways of the World: Developing Autistic Talent96
6Believer in Biochemistry: Medications and New Treatments111
7Dating Data: Autism and Relationships131
8A Cow's Eye View: Connecting with Animals142
9Artists and Accountants: An Understanding of Animal Thought157
10Einstein's Second Cousin: The Link Between Autism and Genius174
11Stairway to Heaven: Religion and Belief189
References and Selected Readings207
Resource List221

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Thinking in Pictures 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 63 reviews.
jwa90010 More than 1 year ago
This book is on my list of best books I've ever read. Why? Because someone with a gift has written about autism from the inside out. Temple Grandin has helped me understand autism and Asperger's Syndrome in a way that writers and doctors without it cannot. More. She has simultaneously helped me understand animal thinking better. She has made me more sympathetic to the plight of animals in our care. And because of her gift has made it possible for me to have empathy for all other beings, human and otherwise. This is an original book. One of kind. She has managed to give it a balanced viewpoint. Both as a friend of animals and as a meat eater. It is not necessary to cause the animals who provide us sustenance unnecessary pain and suffering. She has proven this. The book is enligtening and touching. I recommend this book to ALL readers. Especially those who have friends or family members who have any of the autistic spectrum tendencies. You'll be able to understand your loved ones better. And especially to meat eaters. Be aware, be conscious eaters. Become more active in animal welfare, including farm animals. And be respectful of what they give us. Read this book.
Linda-Carol More than 1 year ago
The author presents her life experiences of living with autism in a straight forward manner that is educational and insightful. She includes reflections from her childhood that help the reader to better understand her view of other children, relationships between people, her educational process, her family, and the animals in her life.
There is a photograph in the text of the author as a pre-adolescent in a squeeze box that she designed and built. She had witnessed how cattle became calm when they were squeezed in a cattle chute as they received injections. She applied this concept as a possibility for reducing anxiety in people. In the appendix there is a manufacturer listed who makes and sells the squeeze box.
She refers to her many accomplishments without attempting to call attention to herself as being very gifted. Her drawings are amazing in her depiction of architectural designs that limit the pain and suffering of animals in the livestock industry.
She also explains the processes of the limbic system as it relates to God and religious thought.
I found this account of how Temple Grandin interacts with her world to be inspiring.






.
gezza More than 1 year ago
I have a major interest in Temple Grandin, and books on Autism/Asperger's, because I have a 5 year old daughter with Asperger's. Nevertheless, Thinking in Pictures is a well written book without that bias. This book is NOT about Temple's life - you need to read Emergence to get the story, and it is well worth reading, but ten years later Temple's writing style has improved amazingly. I keep thinking that the movie on Temple's life would have had more influence from Emergence than Thinking in Pictures, but this book has all the publicity associated with it - go figure. This book is in many ways technical - what it really is about is Grandin's understanding of what autism is, and how autistic people deal with it, and how 'normals' should deal with it. It is well founded in latest findings in psychology, and has a fresh perspective in terms of Grandin's immense experience in animal behavior. She does use examples drawn from her life, which does, in a way, provide a form of autobiography, but as stated above, it is not the point of this work of non-fiction. I can honestly say that I have a more synthesized, cohesive understanding of my daughter's condition reading this book, than all other books put together. An excellent read, but if you are after an autobiography, you will be disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anyone interested in understanding what it feels like to have autism will enjoy this book. Ms. Grandin writes with honesty.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have always known I was different. Even with a successful executive career spanning 40 years, I struggled with social skills, could not comprehend some "normal" situations, literally covered my ears when the noise level got too loud, hated fluorescent lighting which actually hurt my eyes, jumped at unexpected noise, had a touch of dyslexia and had to struggle to stay focused. At age 15 I was diagnosed as clinically depressed and over a period of 45 years participated in therapy and was put on several different anti-depressants. I had given up my hope of ever feeling normal and settled for feeling okay. At the age of 60 two things changed. My therapist of 2 years changed my diagnosis to bi-polar disorder, which effected a change of medication. For the past 18 months I finally feel normal. But now because of this wonderful book I understand that I was genetically at risk for depression, and know that I have been a high-functioning Aspie and still am! Thank you Temple for sharing your knowledge.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have a 4 year old autistic Granddaughter. I have been reading and trying to absorb everything about autism since her diagnosis two years ago. (I am a Registered Nurse)...This is the first bit of information that totally makes sense to me. After reading the book I bought two more copies for other family members. Miss Grandin explains why there is a pause between auditory and visual information passing through the brain. Since giving Victoria ample time to answer questions her answers are quite amazing. She is gifted in music and the book will help us encourage her. Now I am reading Animals in Translation. I thank Miss Grandin for giving us this information and I thank B&N for supplying the books.
dajgourley More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be good and enlightening for those with Autism, it gave me a better understanding of how their lives are so different. It took me four days to read and found it very helpful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Temple Grandin is a high functioning autistic that is gifted in working with animals and is talented in designing livestock handling facilities within the United States. The reason she is so exceptional in her work is because she has a unique ability to view situations from the livestock’s point of view. In this educational book about her life, she expresses her experiences from remarkable points of view, much like how she describes cattle going through handling facilities.  From this book I have gained insight about how it feels to be autistic, to experience autism without actually being on the spectrum. Grandin also provides actuate information on symptoms, signs, and diagnosis of autism which helps the reader fully grasp the spectrum. I really enjoyed being able to be put in her shoes and feeling what it is like growing up with autism. My favorite passage in the book is actually right at the beginning where she describes that words are life a second language to her, that she thinks in full motion picture videos which she can rotate and manipulate in her mind. It opened my eyes and showed me that people do indeed think differently; we don’t all think in words and understand things the best when thinking in words. This book is a must read for anyone wanting to understand autism better, especially parents, teachers, or anyone else who works closely with those on the spectrum. She provides educational insight on how autism spectrum disorder is detected and diagnosed which is mainly helpful to those readers who aren’t closely linked to someone with autism. Without a doubt, I would recommend this to absolutely anyone interested in learning about autism spectrum disorder, it was a great read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ryvr vt
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
asha_loon More than 1 year ago
I have always wanted to have a glimpse of how my son thinks. Temple Grandin's book offers some personal input and explanations as to why autistic people do certain things and why. She offers advice on how to handle situations and emphasizes on the importance of engaging your child or friend or family member into developing talents with preexisting hobbies to ensure a productive adult life. I have only two negative comments. I found myself bored and feeling like I was back in my college Pharmacology class during the Medications chapters. Also Temple tends to repeat herself about certain topics. Of course, I had to keep reminding myself that the author IS autistic and she cannot help it since repetition is a common thing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago