Thinking Like an Engineer: An Active Learning Approach / Edition 2

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Overview

Thinking Like an Engineer: An Active Learning Approach, Third Edition, is specifically designed to utilize an active learning environment for first-year engineering courses.

MyEngineeringLab for Thinking Like an Engineer is a complete digital solution for your first-year engineering course. MyEngineeringLab is an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program that truly engages students as it offers customized, self-paced learning with instant feedback. Students will be prepared ahead of class, allowing you to spend class time focusing on active learning.

Teaching and Learning Experience

This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience—for you and your students. It will help:

  • Personalize Learning: MyEngineeringLab provides students with a personalized interactive learning environment, where they can learn at their own pace and measure their progress.
  • Encourage Guided Inquiry: To create meaningful learning experiences, in-class activities include collaborative problem solving, computer-based activities, and hands-on experiments.
  • Reinforce and Expand on the Activities: Homework assignments and review sections help students conceptualize topics.
  • Customize your Course: Content can be customized to match the topic organization in your course syllabi.
  • Keep Your Course Current: Content is refreshed to provide the most up-to-date information for your course.
Note: You are purchasing the standalone text. MyEngineeringLab does not come automatically packaged with the text. To purchase MyEngineeringLab, search for ISBN-10: 0133808483 / ISBN-13: 9780133808483. That package contains ISBN-10: 0133593215 / ISBN-13: 9780133593211 and ISBN-10: 0133595625 / ISBN-13: 9780133595628. MyEngineeringLab is not a self-paced technology and should only be purchased when required by an instructor.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132766715
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 1/25/2012
  • Format: Spiral Bound
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 768
  • Sales rank: 1,365,746
  • Product dimensions: 7.70 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth A. Stephan is the Director of the General Engineering Program at Clemson University. She earned a BS in Chemical Engineering from The University of Akron. During her undergraduate work, she completed a cooperative education experience with Dow Chemical in Midland, MI, conducted research on coal purification methods, and was named the College of Engineering Outstanding Senior. After graduation, she was employed by Boride, a wholly owned subsidiary of Dow Chemical in Traverse City, MI, specializing in high-performance ceramics. She returned to The University of Akron on a College of Engineering Fellowship, earning her PhD in Chemical Engineering focusing on multiphase transport processes. She has taught at The University of Akron and Wayne College, and served in several post-doctoral positions. She joined the faculty at Clemson in January, 2002 in the General Engineering Program, assuming the role of Director in 2007. Beth has served as a national official as a district director in Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society, since 1996. She is the chief advisor for the South Carolina Alpha Chapter of Tau Beta Pi, and an advisor for the Clemson chapter of Alpha Omega Epsilon, a professional sorority.

David R. Bowman has been teaching in the General Engineering Program at Clemson University since January, 2006. He earned his degrees from Clemson University, including a BS and MS in Computer Engineering and is currently pursuing a PhD. A member of ASEE, David has experience in the design and development of software tools for engineering education research and pedagogy. During his undergraduate and graduate work, David hosted All Screams Considered, an award winning radio show on WSBF-FM, whose name apes the popular NPR program All Things Considered. In addition to broadcasting, David enjoys performing music on acoustic, electric, and bass guitars.

William J. Park is currently an associate professor in the Engineering and Science Education Department at Clemson University. Following a few years as a cattle farmer, he completed three degrees at Clemson University: a BS in Ornamental Horticulture with a particular emphasis on xerophytic plants, an MS in Electrical Engineering focusing on electronic music synthesis, and a PhD in Electrical Engineering conducting research in electronic counter-counter measures. Bill is currently faculty advisor for a student team renovating a very large 1970’s vintage electronic organ, and is a moderately accomplished pianist.

Benjamin L. Sill is Alumni Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering, having retired in 2008 after 32 years at Clemson University. He earned a BS and MS from N.C. State University in Aerospace Engineering and a PhD from Virginia Tech in Aerospace and Ocean Engineering. Before he joined Clemson, Ben was employed by the Naval Ordnance Station, Indian Head, MD, and by Duke Power Company, Charlotte, NC. At Clemson, he was a founder of Clemson’s Wind Load Test Facility. Beginning in 1999 he served as the Director of Clemson’s General Engineering Program. In 2007, he helped establish a new Engineering and Science Education Department at Clemson, and served as its chair until his retirement. He is the recipient of numerous teaching and research awards, including the prestigious Clemson Class of 1939 Award. Outside the university, he gives numerous presentations with topics ranging from humorous to educational – including talks on ancient coins, old maps, wildflowers, houseplants, snakes, birds, and hurricanes. Ben has authored three bird books, has published technical articles on snakes, frogs, fish, volleyball, and bromeliads and has created and registered many new bromeliad hybrids.

Matthew W. Ohland is currently an associate professor of Engineering Education at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN. He earned a BS in Engineering and a BA in Religion from Swarthmore College, MS degrees in both Mechanical Engineering and Materials Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and a PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of Florida. Matt was an NSF postdoctoral fellow for science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education and joined the faculty of General Engineering at Clemson University in 2001. In 2006, he joined the faculty at Purdue University. He was the 2002-2006 National President of Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society. He currently serves as the Chair of the Educational Research and Methods division and an ABET Program Evaluator for the American Society of Engineering Education, on the Administrative Committee of the IEEE Education Society, and as the Chair of the Steering Committee of the IEEE Transactions on Learning Technology.

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Table of Contents

PREFACE ix

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xvii

Part 1

ENGINEERING ESSENTIALS 1

ENGINEERING IS AN . . . ITCH! 3

CHAPTER 1

EVERYDAY ENGINEERING 6

1.1 CHOOSING A CAREER 6

1.2 CHOOSING ENGINEERING AS A CAREER 7

1.3 NAE GRAND CHALLENGES FOR ENGINEERING 9

1.4 CHOOSING A SPECIFIC ENGINEERING FIELD 12

1.5 ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY–A RELATED FIELD 20

1.6 GATHERING INFORMATION 22

1.7 PURSUING STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES 25

REVIEW QUESTIONS 36

CHAPTER 2

ETHICS 40

2.1 ETHICAL DECISION MAKING 41

2.2 PLAGIARISM 46

2.3 ENGINEERING CREED 47

2.4 SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 48

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 50

CHAPTER 3

DESIGN AND TEAMWORK 57

3.1 DESIGN 57

3.2 DEFINING THE PROBLEM OR NEED 59

3.3 CRITERIA: DEFINING WHAT IS IMPORTANT 60

3.4 GENERATING IDEAS 61

3.5 COMPARING DESIGNS AND MAKING DECISIONS 65

3.6 PROTOTYPING AND TESTING 66

3.7 SUSTAINABILITY 68

3.8 WORKING IN TEAMS 70

3.9 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: PERIOD ANALYSIS 76

3.10 PROJECT TIMELINE 79

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 81

MINI DESIGN PROJECTS 82

CHAPTER 4

ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION 86

4.1 BASIC PRESENTATION SKILLS 87

4.2 SAMPLE PRESENTATIONS 89

4.3 BASIC TECHNICAL WRITING SKILLS 92

4.4 COMMON TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION FORMATS 96

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 102

REVIEW QUESTIONS 109

CHAPTER 5

ESTIMATION 114

5.1 GENERAL HINTS FOR ESTIMATION 117

5.2 ESTIMATION BY ANALOGY 119

5.3 ESTIMATION BY AGGREGATION 119

5.4 ESTIMATION BY UPPER AND LOWER BOUNDS 120

5.5 ESTIMATION USING MODELING 121

5.6 SIGNIFICANT FIGURES 121

5.7 REASONABLENESS 125

5.8 NOTATION 129

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 132

REVIEW QUESTIONS 135

CHAPTER 6

SOLVEM 136

6.1 DEFINING SOLVEM 136

6.2 REPRESENTING FINAL RESULTS 142

6.3 AVOIDING COMMON MISTAKES 143

6.4 EXAMPLES OF SOLVEM 143

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 146

REVIEW QUESTIONS 149

Part 2

UBIQUITOUS UNITS 151

CHAPTER 7

FUNDAMENTAL DIMENSIONS

AND BASE UNITS 153

7.1 THE METRIC SYSTEM 154

7.2 OTHER UNIT SYSTEMS 157

7.3 CONVERSION PROCEDURE FOR UNITS 158

7.4 CONVERSIONS INVOLVING MULTIPLE STEPS 161

7.5 CONVERSIONS INVOLVING “NEW” UNITS 165

7.6 DERIVED DIMENSIONS AND UNITS 167

7.7 EQUATION LAWS 171

7.8 CONVERSION INVOLVING EQUATIONS 174

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 177

REVIEW QUESTIONS 182

CHAPTER 8

UNIVERSAL UNITS 188

8.1 FORCE 188

8.2 WEIGHT 191

8.3 DENSITY 193

8.4 AMOUNT 197

8.5 TEMPERATURE 201

8.6 PRESSURE 204

8.7 GAS PRESSURE 209

8.8 ENERGY 211

8.9 POWER 215

8.10 EFFICIENCY 217

8.11 ELECTRICAL CONCEPTS 222

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 232

REVIEW QUESTIONS 242

CHAPTER 9

DIMENSIONLESS NUMBERS 248

9.1 CONSTANTS WITH UNITS 248

9.2 COMMON DIMENSIONLESS NUMBERS 251

9.3 DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS 254

9.4 RAYLEIGH’S METHOD 257

IN-CLASS ACTIVITIES 266

REVIEW QUESTIONS 270

Part 3

SCRUPULOUS

WORKSHEETS 275 TIME MANAGEMENT 277

CHAPTER 10

EXCEL WORKBOOKS 280

10.1 CELL REFERENCES 281

10.2 FUNCTIONS IN EXCEL 284

10.3 LOGIC AND CONDITIONALS 292

10.4 LOOKUP AND DATA VALIDATION 300

10.5 CONDITIONAL FORMATTING 305

10.6 SORTING AND FILTERS 308

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 315

REVIEW QUESTIONS 329

CHAPTER 11

GRAPHICAL SOLUTIONS 342

11.1 GRAPHING TERMINOLOGY 342

11.2 PROPER PLOTS 343

11.3 AVAILABLE GRAPH TYPES IN EXCEL 350

11.4 GRAPH INTERPRETATION 353

11.5 MEANING OF LINE SHAPES 357

11.6 GRAPHICAL SOLUTIONS 362

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 370

REVIEW QUESTIONS 381

CHAPTER 12

MODELS AND SYSTEMS 393

12.1 LINEAR FUNCTIONS 395

12.2 LINEAR RELATIONSHIPS 398

12.3 POWER FUNCTIONS 413

12.4 EXPONENTIAL FUNCTIONS 417

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 422

REVIEW QUESTIONS 432

CHAPTER 13

MATHEMATICAL MODELS 445

13.1 SELECTING A TRENDLINE TYPE 446

13.2 INTERPRETING LOGARITHMIC GRAPHS 454

13.3 CONVERTING SCALES TO LOG IN EXCEL 459

13.4 DEALING WITH LIMITATIONS OF EXCEL 460

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 466

REVIEW QUESTIONS 476

CHAPTER 14

STATISTICS 483

14.1 HISTOGRAMS 484

14.2 STATISTICAL BEHAVIOR 487

14.3 DISTRIBUTIONS 490

14.4 CUMULATIVE DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS 496

14.5 STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL (SPC) 499

14.6 STATISTICS IN EXCEL 504

14.7 STATISTICS IN MATLAB 509

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 514

REVIEW QUESTIONS 523

Part 4

PUNCTILIOUS

PROGRAMMING 525 SOME ADVANTAGES OF COMPUTERS 526

CHAPTER 15

ALGORITHMS 528

15.1 SCOPE 528

15.2 WRITTEN ALGORITHMS 530

15.3 GRAPHICAL ALGORITHMS 532

15.4 ALGORITHM BEST PRACTICES 537

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 544

REVIEW QUESTIONS 547

CHAPTER 16

MATLAB VARIABLES AND DATA TYPES 550

16.1 VARIABLE BASICS 551

16.2 NUMERIC TYPES AND SCALARS 553

16.3 VECTORS 557

16.4 MATRICES 566

16.5 CHARACTER STRINGS 574

16.6 CELL ARRAYS 577

16.7 STRUCTURE ARRAYS 584

16.8 SAVING AND RESTORING VALUES 587

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 589

REVIEW QUESTIONS 593

CHAPTER 17

PROGRAMS AND FUNCTIONS 596

17.1 PROGRAMS 596

17.2 FUNCTIONS 606

17.3 DEBUGGING MATLAB CODE 612

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 615

REVIEW QUESTIONS 621

CHAPTER 18

INPUT/OUTPUT IN MATLAB 627

18.1 INPUT 627

18.2 OUTPUT 633

18.3 PLOTTING 637

18.4 POLYFIT 644

18.5 MICROSOFT EXCEL I/O 650

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 655

REVIEW QUESTIONS 664

CHAPTER 19

LOGIC AND CONDITIONALS 673

19.1 RELATIONAL AND LOGICAL OPERATORS 674

19.2 LOGICAL VARIABLES 676

19.3 CONDITIONAL STATEMENTS IN MATLAB 682

19.4 switch STATEMENTS 686

19.5 ERRORS AND WARNINGS 689

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 692

REVIEW QUESTIONS 699

CHAPTER 20

LOOPING STRUCTURES 709

20.1 for LOOPS 709

20.2 while LOOPS 719

20.3 APPLICATION OF LOOPS: GUI 723

IN CLASS ACTIVITIES 735

REVIEW QUESTIONS 744

COMPREHENSION CHECK ANSWERS 755

INDEX 772

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