Third Grade Pet by Judy Cox, Cynthia Fisher |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Third Grade Pet

Third Grade Pet

by Judy Cox, Cynthia Fisher
     
 

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The good news is that the third grade can buy a class pet. The bad news for Rosemary is that the kids want a rat! How gross!

There's no way Rosemary's mother will let her take a turn as ratkeeper for a creepy, dirty animal. But Rosemary surprises herself when she begins to like Cheese, the gray and white hooded rat. Then, when Cheese's life is in danger, it's

Overview

The good news is that the third grade can buy a class pet. The bad news for Rosemary is that the kids want a rat! How gross!

There's no way Rosemary's mother will let her take a turn as ratkeeper for a creepy, dirty animal. But Rosemary surprises herself when she begins to like Cheese, the gray and white hooded rat. Then, when Cheese's life is in danger, it's Rosemary to the rescue . . . if she can hide him from her family!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
Rosemary is appalled when her classmates pick a rat as the class pet. Rats are dirty, rats live in sewers, rats carry disease, and rats bite. In short, rats are yucky and Rosemary wants nothing to do with this one. However, when the students try to decide on a name for the class pet, Rosemary can't resist calling out her suggestion of "Cheese." Cheese is chosen as the perfect name and Rosemary and Brian are chosen to be the caretakers of the rat for the first week. Brian brags about having had rats as pets, but the teacher shows Rosemary how to pick up the little rat and how to take care of him. Rosemary realizes that Cheese may be a rat, but he is a warm, cuddly and adorable pet. Rosemary becomes attached to the rodent and worries that Brian will be careless with him. Young readers will enjoy the humorous antics as Rosemary attempts to protect the class pet by sneaking it out of the classroom and taking it home. Included are tips on choosing and caring for a pet rat.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4--When her class adopts a rat as a pet, Rosemary is horrified. However, she quickly warms up to Cheese and soon finds herself trying to save him from the clutches of Brian, the class clown. To prevent the boy from harming the animal when it is his turn to take him overnight, she sneaks the creature out of school to her home. There, a host of new problems surface, including a curious baby brother. Realizing this is not a solution, Rosemary returns the pet to the classroom, making sure that Brian understands his responsibility for the animal's care. Readers who are becoming comfortable with chapter books as well as fans of Suzy Kline's "Horrible Harry" series (Viking) and Betsy Duffey's How to Be Cool in the Third Grade (Viking, 1993) will feel right at home with this light and breezy story. Fisher's illustrations rendered in pen and ink and watercolor washes in black-and-white bring the lovable rodent to life.--Lisa Gangemi Krapp, formerly at Sousa Elementary School, Port Washington, NY
Kirkus Reviews
A girl with a fear of rats overcomes that aversion in this fast-paced classroom story, where the personalities of the students and a funny, alert teacher take center stage. Rosemary is horrified when a rat becomes the class pet. She can't help herself, though, when the students are deciding on a name; she shouts "Cheese" and the name is adopted. When it's her turn to take care of Cheese, Rosemary grows fond of the pet. So fond, in fact, that she steals it rather than let her awful classmate Brian take it home. After several misadventures trying to hide it at home, she gets it back into the cage, confesses to Mr. Wilder, and gives Brian a quick lecture on how to care for Cheese properly. Cox's glowing description of Rosemary's introduction to Cheese is believable; the author, who includes rat care tips at the end, obviously has great fondness for rats, and conveys those feelings without being cloying. The class, the teacher, even Brian are all casually realistic, and the story will surely have young readers clamoring for rats of their own. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 6-10) .

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440416289
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
10/10/2000
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.19(w) x 7.59(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Judy Cox is an elementary school teacher. She has written many books for young readers. She has also had stories, poems, essays, and articles published in Cricket and Spider.

Cynthia Fisher has illustrated many books for children. She lives in western Massachusetts.

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