Thirst

( 10 )

Overview

Thirst, a collection of fortythree new poems from Pulitzer Prizewinner Mary Oliver, introduces two new directions in the poet's work. Grappling with grief at the death of her beloved partner of over forty years, she strives to experience sorrow as a path to spiritual progress, grief as part of loving and not its end. And within these pages she chronicles for the frst time her discovery of faith, without abandoning the love of the physical world that has been a hallmark of her ...
See more details below
Paperback
$13.31
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$15.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (32) from $4.72   
  • New (21) from $8.21   
  • Used (11) from $4.72   
Thirst: Poems

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
(Save 33%)$15.00 List Price

Overview

Thirst, a collection of fortythree new poems from Pulitzer Prizewinner Mary Oliver, introduces two new directions in the poet's work. Grappling with grief at the death of her beloved partner of over forty years, she strives to experience sorrow as a path to spiritual progress, grief as part of loving and not its end. And within these pages she chronicles for the frst time her discovery of faith, without abandoning the love of the physical world that has been a hallmark of her work for four decades.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
In an earlier poem, Mary Oliver wrote, "When we die the body breaks open / like a river; / the old body goes on, climbing the hill." In Thirst, Oliver moves forward in the wake of her beloved partner's death. As always, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet hinges her reflections on the natural world, never allowing them to dwindle into pointy sentiments or maudlin thoughts. A major collection from one of our most gifted poets.
From the Publisher
To read Thirst, is to feel gratititude for the simple fact of being alive. This is not surprising, as it is the effect [Oliver's] best work has produced in readers for the past 43 years. —Angela O'Donnell, America Magazine

"Mary Oliver moves by instinct, faith, and determination. She is among our finest poets, and still growing." —Alicia Ostriker, The Nation

"It has always seemed, across her [many] books of poetry, . . . that Mary Oliver might leave us at any minute. Even a 1984 Pulitzer Prize couldn't pin her to the ground. She'd change quietly into a heron or a bear and fly or walk on forever." —Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times

"Mary Oliver. In a region that has produced most of the nation's poet laureates, it is risky to single out one fragile 71-year-old bard of Provincetown. But Mary Oliver, who won the Pulitzer Prize in poetry in 1983, is my choice for her joyous, accessible, intimate observations of the natural world. Her Wild Geese has become so popular it now graces posters in dorm rooms across the land. But don't hold that against her. Read almost anything in New and Selected Poems. She teaches us the profound act of paying attention—a living wonder that makes it possible to appreciate all the others."—Renée Loth, Boston Globe

Publishers Weekly
Consoling, and intense interaction with the natural world abounds in the 43 poems of Pulitzer Prize-winner Oliver's new collection, as her many readers might expect. The trees whisper, a ribbon snake imparts lessons and the poet is likened to a swimming otter. What has changed, though, is that Oliver's new work reflects her faith in God and her grief over the death of her longtime partner. Those who do not share her brand of faith may or may not find its terms difficult to accept-"Everything is His./ The door. The door jamb"-but the loss of a loved one is more universal: of grief, she writes, "I went closer, / and I did not die." Still, many of these poems mention or court cataclysmic loss while refusing to dwell in it. At times, Oliver's will-to-gratitude can feel like preaching or admonishment; Oliver describes a luna moth with "a pale green wing whose rim is like a musical notation," before adding, "Have you noticed?" The role of danger or evil in this Eden is mostly unacknowledged: "... the things of this world / ... are kind, and maybe// also troubled." (Oct.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Oliver, an award-winning "nature poet" with an eclectic following, here reveals an early desire that may come as a surprise to some readers: "I had such longing for virtue, for company./I wanted Christ to be as close as the cross I wear. I wanted to read and serve, to touch the altar linen." Some poems address God, while others discuss the world: a delicate moth, a dear friend, the dog, Percy. Bereft after the death of her longtime partner, Oliver finds strength in a stoic struggle toward pure love that transcends one person. In this frame of mind, even a late-day walk in a snow storm brings comfort: "this world,/which is falling apart now,/which is white and wild,/which is faithful beyond all our expressions of faith." In these self-effacing poems, Oliver continues her work of loving the world, acknowledging that not all love is returned and that "in matters of love/of this kind/there are things we long to do/but must not do." For all collections.
—E.M. Kaufman
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807068977
  • Publisher: Beacon
  • Publication date: 9/3/2007
  • Pages: 88
  • Sales rank: 204,042
  • Product dimensions: 6.22 (w) x 8.45 (h) x 0.29 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary Oliver

Mary Oliver is one of the most celebrated and best-selling poets in America. Her books include Red Bird; Our World; Thirst; Blue Iris; New and Selected Poems, Volume One; and New and Selected Poems, Volume Two. She has also published five books of prose, including Rules for the Dance and, most recently, Long Life. She lives in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 20, 2010

    THIRST IS ELOQUENT AND MYSTICAL

    I was drawn to the title because living in the desert thirst is an ever present concern.

    I was delighted when I began reading THIRST to find it was about the other unquenchable THIRST in one's life, the search for peace and joy, and a higher being.

    Mary Oliver creates from her palate of words some of the most wonderful places a reader would want to go. The poetry style is easy reading. I would classify her writing as excerpts of insights rather than poems.

    Mary Oliver's THIRST enlightened my mind and delighted my soul. I would encourage anyone who is seeking peace, quite, and perhaps even their God, to read THIRST, Poems by Mary Oliver.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Oliver touches my soul once again

    OLIVER, Mary. Thirst: Poems by Mary Oliver. Beacon Press. 2006. 71 p. 5 stars.

    Winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, Mary Oliver has penned another collection of forty-three moving and meaningful poems. Coping with the loss of her lifelong partner, Oliver's latest book contains poems full of grief, confusion and spiritual hope. Similar to her other works (of which there are over 20), Thirst focuses on the themes of the natural world, the fluid physical environment and living beings; as a result Oliver presents us with a heart-felt, basic and pure way of looking at life (and death as a part of life). "Wherever else I live-in music, in words, in the fires of the heart, I abide just as deeply in this nameless, indivisible place, this world, which is falling apart now, which is white and wild, which is faithful beyond all our expressions of faith, our deepest prayers" (2-3). As always, Oliver is able to describe what we feel and see in a pure and remarkable way. She is not gratuitous with her words (some poems are only two sentences long) yet she conveys a sentiment or thought beautifully.
    The book's layout is simplistic; there are no illustrations except for the cover photograph. The cover art is made to mimic a linen journal. The font is the same throughout and basic in style. The reader is forced to focus on Oliver's poems, her words. Her basic themes and simple style allow readers new to the genre to approach poetry without feeling lost or overwhelmed. This volume would be suitable for high school readers and should be available to anyone with an appreciation for nature or life's trials and triumphs. After completing this collection, I can only say I was thirsty for more.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2010

    Is Oliver Thirsty Enough?

    No.

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Deeply moving

    I found Thirst to feels like a book of prayers and not poetry. It was warm and welcoming and just what I needed to help me through a dark time in life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2014

    Tim

    Where were we?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

    Unreadable sections

    All small typed examples are unreadable even if you increase font size to very high. The rest of the content is great. Had to quit reading it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)