This Beautiful Life

This Beautiful Life

2.9 62
by Helen Schulman
     
 

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"ThisBeautiful Life is a gripping, potent and blisteringly well-written story offamily, dilemma, and consequence. . . . I read this book with white-knuckledurgency, and I finished it in tears. Helen Schulman is an absolutely brilliantnovelist." —Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love
 

Theevents of a single

Overview

"ThisBeautiful Life is a gripping, potent and blisteringly well-written story offamily, dilemma, and consequence. . . . I read this book with white-knuckledurgency, and I finished it in tears. Helen Schulman is an absolutely brilliantnovelist." —Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love
 

Theevents of a single night shatter one family’s sense of security and identity inthis provocative and deeply affecting domestic drama from Helen Schulman, theacclaimed author of A Day at the Beach and Out of Time. In thetradition of Lionel Shriver, Sue Miller, and Laura Moriarty, Schulman crafts abrilliantly observed portrait of parenting and modern life, cunningly exploringour most deeply-held convictions and revealing the enduring strengths thatemerge in the face of crisis.

Editorial Reviews

Maria Russo
…riveting…as much as this book fiercely inhabits our shared online reality, it operates most powerfully on a deeper level, posing an enduring question about American values—is it worth leaving a perfectly good life to grab a chance for something more?…Schulman somehow makes all these characters lovable, even when their least attractive qualities are on display.
—The New York Times
Mary McGarry Morris
Schulman has managed to capture this bizarre of-the-moment tragedy in a novel that remains deeply humane and sensitive…This Beautiful Life is a powerful story of a good family in crisis. Schulman vividly portrays the circularity of events and the instantaneous connections of lives caught in a very real world wide web. How like the butterfly's wings when the mere tap of a key can unleash storms of such unimaginable consequence.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
In this sobering tale of how adolescent stupidity can have criminal and social repercussions, Schulman (A Day at the Beach) explores what happens when a privileged teen boy forwards to friends a sexually explicit video made for him by a classmate. Jake Bergamot, 15, has recently moved to New York City from Ithaca, N.Y., with his parents, Richard and Liz, and his kindergarten-aged sister, Coco. Life in Ithaca was easy and idyllic, but after Richard takes a job in the city, that all changes. Jake is enrolled at Wildwood, a New York City prep school where he makes a new circle of friends and attends wild parties, one of which leads to the video—later made by a girl at the party who Jake refuses to sleep with because, among other reasons, she's too young—that could determine the direction his young life will take. Jake is a good student and a nice kid, and his parents are rocked to their foundations by their son being snared in a child pornography scandal. The plot is ripe for salacious tabloid treatment, but Schulman sidesteps easy shock and hyperbole to turn out a provocative story of ethics and responsibilities in the ever-shifting digital age. (Aug.)
Library Journal
All's well with the Bergamot family, new to New York's Upper West Side—until son Jake receives a sexually explicit video from an eighth-grade admirer that in a moment of cockiness and confusion he sends to a friend. Soon it's viral, Jake is suspended from his private school, and the whole family starts tearing at the seams. Schulman's quietly thoughtful A Day at the Beach was one of those rare novels about 9/11 that didn't exploit the event, and I expect the same here. The first pages are sobering, elegant, and fluid.
The Oprah Magazine O
“A rich, engrossing, and surprisingly nuanced novel exploring timeless questions of guilt and responsiblity.”
People (3.5 out of 4 stars)
“Schulman’s topical, unsettling new novel [is] set in Manhattan’s world of private-school privilege but chillingly relatable for parents anywhere…. Raising tough questions about child rearing, morality and the way the Internet both frees and imprisons, Schulman’s story resonates.”
People (3 ½ out of 4 stars)
“Schulman’s topical, unsettling new novel [is] set in Manhattan’s world of private-school privilege but chillingly relatable for parents anywhere…. Raising tough questions about child rearing, morality and the way the Internet both frees and imprisons, Schulman’s story resonates.”
People
“Schulman’s topical, unsettling new novel [is] set in Manhattan’s world of private-school privilege but chillingly relatable for parents anywhere…. Raising tough questions about child rearing, morality and the way the Internet both frees and imprisons, Schulman’s story resonates.”
(3 1/2 out of 4 stars) - People Magazine
"Schulman’s topical, unsettling new novel [is] set in Manhattan’s world of private-school privilege but chillingly relatable for parents anywhere…. Raising tough questions about child rearing, morality and the way the Internet both frees and imprisons, Schulman’s story resonates."
Tom Perrotta
This Beautiful Life isn’t just an intimate look at family breaking down under intense pressure; it’s also a sharp and unsparing indictment of a culture in search of scapegoats. In this timely and provocative novel, Helen Schulman maps out the contours of a contemporary American nightmare.”
Elizabeth Gilbert
“A gripping, potent, and blisteringly well-written story of family, dilemma, and consequence. While the setting is thoroughly modern, the drama feels as ancient and inevitable as a Greek myth. I read this book with white-knuckled urgency, and finished it in tears. Helen Schulman is an absolutely brilliant novelist.”
Jonathan Dee
“In the hands of a lesser writer, this might have been simply a book about a scandal; Helen Schulman, though, has a long enough view, and a large enough heart, to have found in that scandal’s outlines a mournful and affecting portrait of our brave new social world.”
Kate Christensen
“Helen Schulman’s trenchant social observations and precise, lucid writing are brought to bear on the timely story of a crisis in the life of the Bergamot family…. Schulman takes on a controversial topic with depth, evenhandedness, and warmth. Spare and focused, This Beautiful Life packs a wallop.”
Hannah Gerson
“In another writer’s hands, it might come out as a cautionary tale, but Schulman is careful not to paint anyone as villain or victim.”
Jim Shepard
“A harrowing and moving account of just how much twenty-first-century technology has magnified the scope of the kind of imbecilities in which teenagers excel. It’s poignant about the fragility of even those homes that are seemingly invulnerably insulated by privilege and caring and vigilant parents.”
Jonathan Miles
“With psychological acuity and cinematic pacing, Helen Schulman takes a hypercontemporary nightmare…and parlays it into a wildly compelling novel about parenting, privilege, and the fragility of happiness…. This Beautiful Life is moving, disturbing, and grandly incisive.”
Jennifer Egan
“Helen Schulman is one of the most gifted writers of her generation.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062092687
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/02/2011
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
220,355
File size:
350 KB

Read an Excerpt

This Beautiful Life

A Novel
By Helen Schulman

Harper

Copyright © 2011 Helen Schulman
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780062024381


Chapter One

Her mouth filled the screen. Purple lip gloss, clear braces.
"Still think I'm too young?"
She leaned over, the fixed lens of the camera catching a tiny
smattering of blemishes on her cheek, like a comet's spray. Her
hair had been bleached white, with long blond roots, and most of
it was pulled back and up into a chunky ponytail above the three
plastic hoops climbing the rim of her ear.
The song began to play, Beyoncé. I love to love you, baby. She
stepped aside, revealing her room in all its messy glory. Above
the bed was a painting; the central image was a daisy. A large lava
lamp bubbled and gooed on the nightstand.
She was giggling offstage. Suddenly, the screen was a swirl
of green plaid. Filmstrips of color in knife pleats. Her short skirt
swayed along with her round hips. A little roll of ivory fat nestled
above the waistband. She wore a white tank top, which she
took off, her hands quickly finding the cups of her black bra. The
breasts inside were small, and at first she covered them with her
palms, fingers splayed like scallop shells. Then she unhooked the
bra in the front and they popped out as if on springs. Her hands
did a little fan dance as they reached below her hemline and lifted
up her skirt.
She'd done all of this for his benefit. To please him. To prove
him wrong. She reached out for the little toy baseball bat and the
next part was hard to watch, even if you knew what was coming.
Except it wasn't.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from This Beautiful Life by Helen Schulman Copyright © 2011 by Helen Schulman. Excerpted by permission of Harper. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

What People are saying about this

Jennifer Egan
“Helen Schulman is one of the most gifted writers of her generation.”
Jonathan Dee
“In the hands of a lesser writer, this might have been simply a book about a scandal; Helen Schulman, though, has a long enough view, and a large enough heart, to have found in that scandal’s outlines a mournful and affecting portrait of our brave new social world.”
Jim Shepard
“A harrowing and moving account of just how much twenty-first-century technology has magnified the scope of the kind of imbecilities in which teenagers excel. It’s poignant about the fragility of even those homes that are seemingly invulnerably insulated by privilege and caring and vigilant parents.”
Tom Perrotta
This Beautiful Life isn’t just an intimate look at family breaking down under intense pressure; it’s also a sharp and unsparing indictment of a culture in search of scapegoats. In this timely and provocative novel, Helen Schulman maps out the contours of a contemporary American nightmare.”
Elizabeth Gilbert
“A gripping, potent, and blisteringly well-written story of family, dilemma, and consequence. While the setting is thoroughly modern, the drama feels as ancient and inevitable as a Greek myth. I read this book with white-knuckled urgency, and finished it in tears. Helen Schulman is an absolutely brilliant novelist.”
Mary McGarry Morris
“This Beautiful Life is as much a bracing novel as a timely cautionary tale…. Schulman has managed to capture this bizarre of-the-moment tragedy in a novel that remains deeply humane and sensitive…. This Beautiful Life is a powerful story of a good family in crisis.”
Maria Russo
“Riveting. . . . As much as this book fiercely inhabits our shared online reality, it operates most powerfully on a deeper level, posing an enduring question about American values.”
Kate Christensen
“Helen Schulman’s trenchant social observations and precise, lucid writing are brought to bear on the timely story of a crisis in the life of the Bergamot family…. Schulman takes on a controversial topic with depth, evenhandedness, and warmth. Spare and focused, This Beautiful Life packs a wallop.”
Jonathan Miles
“With psychological acuity and cinematic pacing, Helen Schulman takes a hypercontemporary nightmare…and parlays it into a wildly compelling novel about parenting, privilege, and the fragility of happiness…. This Beautiful Life is moving, disturbing, and grandly incisive.”
Hannah Gerson
“In another writer’s hands, it might come out as a cautionary tale, but Schulman is careful not to paint anyone as villain or victim.”

Meet the Author

Helen Schulman is the author of the novels A Day at the Beach, P.S., The Revisionist, and Out of Time, as well as the short story collection Not a Free Show. An associate professor of writing at The New School, she lives in New York City.

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This Beautiful Life 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 62 reviews.
BillGNY More than 1 year ago
The plot of "My Beautiful Life" is well-described here already. What seems to have been missed in the reviews below is that the reason to read this book is the revelation of character. Despite the sensational premise, it's not about the plot. It's not a "beach read." And while suspenseful, it's best read not too quickly. Jake in particular, the 15 1/2 year old boy, is a tour de force. but his parents, the other two main characters, are well-drawn also if not as completely fleshed out. I'd have liked to have understood more, for example, about the mother's actual interest in art history as art & history, and not merely a career. I'd have liked a little more elaboration of Richard's conflict between his drive and gentler qualities. It's all explained, but I'd have liked to have seen the conflict. I found the ending satisfying and realistic. Definitely 5 stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I could not get into this book at all. I found I didn't care about these characters and there was no one I could relate to. They all felt flat to me. Also, the book seemed to go on and on, with her overly detailed and unnecessary descriptions, that I kept looking to see how many pages I had left till I finally finished it, and its only 162 pages! Usually I look to see how many pages I have left because I don't want to finish a book, here it couldn't come soon enough.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read the reviews in the Times and Post and loaded it on my e-reader. I liked the first 3/4 of the book (reading it at the beach) well enough, but really thought the last 1/4 and ending fell flat. So much more could have been done to develop and finish the story. Preferred Every Last One by Anna Quindlen to this as a story of a family in crisis.
Bette Hanauer More than 1 year ago
Realistic appraisal of life in private school in New York City fot the current generation of teens. This story will break your heart! West Orange Granny
emtl More than 1 year ago
The plot line is very thin and it took just too long to develop in my opinion. Could have been a short story or novella. I was disappointed; expected more. Too much angst and not enough substance.
bookchickdi More than 1 year ago
I was able to relate to the characters in Helen Schulman's shattering novel, This Beautiful Life. Liz and Richard Bergamot lived in upstate New York, Ithaca, about 30 minutes from where I lived for 45 years. Richard got a fabulous offer for a job in Manhattan, doing work that he found meaningful and rewarding. The family moved to Manhattan. Fours years ago, my husband also received a job offer, doing something meaningful and rewarding, and off we went. Unlike Liz and Richard, our children were grown and off to college, so we did not have to uproot them and raise them in Manhattan. Jake is their 15 year-old-son, who had to leave the suburban beauty of Ithaca and navigate the urban center of Manhattan. Coco, their adopted Chinese daughter, took to Manhattan and all its charms like a duck to water. She was popular with all the "right" girls at school, and got invited to every fancy party. Liz transitioned from working part-time teaching art at the university in Ithaca to being one of the "ladies who lunch". Richard was consumed by his job, and I loved how Liz described him as "exuding competence. He was a self-cleaning oven. And even after all these years, Liz was not immune to the power of his good looks." The description of parenting of these children of privilege hits close to home for many parents today. "they are both too close to their children and too far away from the ground. They are too accomplished. They have accumulated too much. They expect too much. They demand too much. They even love their kids too much. This love is crippling in its own way." Jake receives a video from a very young girl he met at a party. It is a pornographic video she made of herself. He doesn't know what to do, and he sends it to his friend to get his opinion. His friend passes it on, and soon it has become viral; the whole world sees it. The life that the Bergamots have is turned upside down. Jake is suspended from his private school, and he may be prosecuted for distributing child pornography. Richard's boss forces him to lay low from his very public position because the story is all over the tabloids and they can't afford the bad publicity. Liz withdraws into her own world, refusing to get out bed most days, glued to her laptop computer. She watches the video of the girl endlessly, and that leads her to other pornography that she can't stop watching. Watching the family fall apart is devastating, and Schulman makes these characters so real that you ache for them. Reading it makes you think "there but for the grace of God and one bad decision go I". As parents we try to teach our children to make good decisions, and we hope that when they eventually do make a bad decision, as they all will, that it is one they can come back from. But in today's plugged-in world, where the click of a mouse can change one's life, making a bad decision can be life-altering. I cried a few times reading this novel, no more so than when Jake tells his dad that he screwed up again, and Richard says, "I'm your father. I'm always on your side." This is a good family, and how they try to live with what happened is something every parent can relate to, although we hope to never be tested as the Bergamots were. This book takes you on an emotional, heart-rending journey, one that will make you think about the fragility of the life you have.
love2read123 More than 1 year ago
This book, while overrated by the NY Times and the Washington Post reviewers, is definately in the "quick, juicy beach read" league. A true-life episode occured some years ago when a young girl's sex video went viral at an "elite" NYC private school, and these incidents, unfortunately, are now more common everywhere. The book's themes (it takes place in the pre-Facebook era!!)are interesting: the effects of the digital age on the family, affluenza, the cult of motherhood, etc. The book is not a comedy, but I did chuckle when one of the minor characters used "ERB" (referring to the test hat NYC 4 year-olds take to enter private school kindergarten) as a verb ("My kid ERB'd in" or something to that effect). But the sophomoric writing, hackneyed urban cliches and poorly-drawn, unlikeable main characters made it difficult for me to truly engage with this novel. The only character who came to life for me was the son, Jake, and there were passages, written from his perspective, that actually were heartbreaking (but I have a son near that age, so maybe I'm more vulnerable to Jake's story). This is a book that you can throw onto your e-reader or wait until it comes out in paperback or buy it and pack it up for the beach. It'll keep you entertained for an afternoon.
Helen Mcwilliams More than 1 year ago
I'm sorry but this gratuitously vulgar, stale, self-absorbed book was a waste of $12. It is so overwritten and precious that I feel like I am reading some high school creative writing project.
me2nc 6 months ago
This was a good-enough read, but did not keep me on the edge of my seat or the feeling of not wanting to put it down. It was a little shallow to me on the character development, but the plot was enough to keep me interested enough to want to see it to the end.
LynnLD More than 1 year ago
In this age of high technology, the Bergamot family is devastated and torn apart when their fifteen -year old son, Jake, is caught up in a porn scandal. He was at a party and a pre-teen girl later sends him a self- exposing video which has too hideous to totally describe. It goes viral and affects the father’s job, the mother’s state of mind, Jake’s mental stability, and the younger sister sees the video and acts it out for her kindergarten classmates, to her mother’s horror. Ultimately, the marriage breaks apart and though they go forth, no one fully recovers. It speaks to the lack of safety and security when using the Internet. A compelling read and a page turner!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good luck
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not a girl who has everything she wants. I'm also not living a bad, horrible life. But things are kept inside. And I want to let them out. There's nothing bad about that, right? I wouldn't call myself pretty. I have brown eyes, brown hair. There is nothing special about me. I have my best friends: Katy, Arlie, and Emma. They're basically my only friends. Yesterday Katy and I were homecoming dress shopping. She got a great, beautiful dress. It was the prettiest thing I have ever seen. Mine was basic. Normal, but it made me feel better about myself. I looked i the mirror at the store and told myself that I looked okay. I felt wonderful. So I got my dress for homecoming. I wish there was a way to get a homecoming date that easily. Okay, I'm going to be 100% honest. I have never had a real life boyfriend. I have had some internet ones that have only resulted in crushing heartbreak. I got cheated on...twice. By the same guy. Anyway, I would love to hav a homecoming date. More specific, I'd really like this guy in my English class that I have a major crush on to ask me. But that won't happen. I haven't talked him. Maybe twice...about English. I listened to his stories Friday. I looked in those light green eyes and got trapped inside. I'm pretty sure I left my heart there. It hurts...for no specific reason. I just really like him. He's not the hottest thing, which is good because I'm not exactly a looker, but he's got my heart. He doesn't even know me that much. It's sad. I'm such a hopeless romantic. I'm also very, unnaturally shy around him. I have trouble, looking, at him. I got some advice today. The next time I see him I will send a smile his way...hopefully. It might come out as smile...or an awkward face scrunch. I' getting butterflies just thinking about it. Anyway, this guys name is Carson. Hopefully he will be in this story a lot later on...or soon. Soon would be great. But I might actually have to talk for this to happen. Is it bad that I have been watchig youtube videos about how to get a guy to like you? And everyone says be confident. I really just want to dive into Carson's eyes, and never come back from that sea of green. But if you think I'm telling him that, you're crazy. This is the first time I've had crush in a while. I'm going crazy. He is always on my mind. I think about him legit 24/7. My heart flutters. He's tall. Like...really tall. Probably around 6'0"...or taller. I'm a whole 5'4". I'm already nervous for tomorrow. Because I have to smile at him. That has taken my patheticness to a whole new level. Maybe this is more of a blog...whatever you want to call it, it is going to have to come to an end for now. Maybe tomorrow I will have some exciting news. Or I could just continue to mentally imagein Carson and I together. So, this will be al for today...wish m luck. And for the ones who will come back tomorrow, if there are any, you are the best. I just feel the need to tell someone everything. And this is my way of doing so. Ifyou were bored beyond recognition, well...bye then. I won't see those wh don't care. Okay, I'm leaving now. Did I mention my crush is a fighting ginger? Yeah, now I'm really going to go. Daydream about my bae *snorts sarcastically* or not my bae. I just found out what that meant too. Bye guys, thanks for listening and not judging. Or judging. Whatever suits you best.
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While the author attempts to illuminate the issues of the lack of privacy due to the internet age, the impulsive actions of adolescents, and unintended consequences, she sabotages her writing by tainting it with condescension toward her characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hated it could have been a good story unnecssary sexual situations
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