This Book Isn't Fat, It's Fabulous

This Book Isn't Fat, It's Fabulous

4.3 13
by Nina Beck
     
 

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KIRKUS REVIEWS called this winning tale of a queen-sized queen bee "Hilarious and fresh." Manhattan It Girl Riley Swain is no pudgy wallflower. She's brash, bold, fashionable, and yes, fabulous. Riley has no qualms about kissing her best friend's crush, or bribing her dad's lawyer. But this spring break, Riley's dad and wicked stepmother are shipping her off to New… See more details below

Overview

KIRKUS REVIEWS called this winning tale of a queen-sized queen bee "Hilarious and fresh." Manhattan It Girl Riley Swain is no pudgy wallflower. She's brash, bold, fashionable, and yes, fabulous. Riley has no qualms about kissing her best friend's crush, or bribing her dad's lawyer. But this spring break, Riley's dad and wicked stepmother are shipping her off to New Horizons, a two-week fat camp in upstate New York. And it's miserable: like military school without carbs. But then Riley gets to know adorable Eric, who sees beyond Riley's tough exterior. Soon, Riley might just realize that maybe it's not her shape that will change at New Horizons. . . but her heart.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Paula McMillen
Sixteen year old Riley Swain has an "attitude" that amuses her peers and irritates the adults around her. She is at war with her soon-to-be step-mother, who, Riley believes, has conspired to have her sent away to a fat camp in upstate New York over spring break. Riley lies to all her friends, including her best friend "D" (short for Michael D. Hammond III) about why she isn't coming along on the class trip. She's been in love with "D" forever until she kissed him the night before she left and now she's not so sure. And then Riley meets her verbal jousting equal in Eric, the son of the fat camp director, and he's kind of cute in a strange punk sort of way, so now she's really confused! The story is not deep on plot but introduces a likable character who comes to some new realizations about herself and her most important relationships. Riley's narrative is humorously punctuated by facsimiles of correspondence with her father's attorney, a regional head of the FDA, and a representative of the CIA, as well as her e-mail exchanges with THEBIGUN17. This might be a particularly appropriate recommendation for teens with body image/weight concerns. Reviewer: Paula McMillen, Ph.D.
School Library Journal

Gr 9 Up

During spring break, overweight Riley Swain, 16, is headed to New Horizons, a school "for young ladies" specializing in body-image issues and eating disorders. Despite her best efforts to hide the truth from all of her rich Manhattan friends, a rumor has circulated that she is going to fat camp. She even lies to her best friend, Michael, with whom she is in love, about where she is headed. Upon her arrival at New Horizons she meets Eric, the son of the program director who is totally not her type, but to whom she is attracted. As she and Eric begin to develop feelings for one another, she begins to question her relationship with Michael. Riley is not a likable character and even though she changes drastically, her transformation seems forced. She has been painted as so shallow that it is hard to imagine her doing any type of soul searching. The plot is full of holes, and it becomes confusing to keep track of which boy she likes and why. The author never really addresses the issues of body image, and the story about this teenage love triangle is disappointing at best.-Julianna M. Helt, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA

Kirkus Reviews
From a wealthy, snarky social scene to a fat camp resembling "a foreign country filled with geeks," 16-year-old Riley's narration is hilarious and fresh. She's busy being in unrequited love with male best friend D (who doesn't even have the "decency" to be gay) and IMing with a stranger online when her distracted father and almost-stepmother "Elizabitch" exile her to fat camp. Saucy Eric, the camp director's son, picks her up from the train station and they begin to trade barbs full of delicious sexual tension. Why is her picture already in his pocket, and should she say "You're a freak" or "Let's make out" or "I like your nail polish"? (It's red.) Lying is a big theme; Riley knows all along that she's fabulous and fine without any weight-loss lessons, but a major crying meltdown helps her open up emotionally. Despite a few narrative glitches (the fat camp's brochure erroneously and inexplicably claims that it "specialize[s] . . . in eating disorders"), this girl has flair. (Fiction. YA)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545232128
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
02/01/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
807,715
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

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