This Is Getting Old: Zen Thoughts on Aging with Humor and Dignity

Overview

in this intimate and funny collection of essays on the sometimes confusing, sometimes poignant, sometimes hilarious condition of being a woman over sixty, Susan Moon keeps her sense of humor and her reader fully engaged. Among the pieces she has included here are an essay on the gratitude she feels for her weakening bones; observations on finding herself both an orphan and a matriarch following the death of her mother; musings on her tendency to regret the past; thoughts on how not to be afraid of loneliness; ...

See more details below
Paperback
$10.79
BN.com price
(Save 27%)$14.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (32) from $2.07   
  • New (15) from $6.67   
  • Used (17) from $2.07   
This Is Getting Old: Zen Thoughts on Aging with Humor and Dignity

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$14.95 List Price

Overview

in this intimate and funny collection of essays on the sometimes confusing, sometimes poignant, sometimes hilarious condition of being a woman over sixty, Susan Moon keeps her sense of humor and her reader fully engaged. Among the pieces she has included here are an essay on the gratitude she feels for her weakening bones; observations on finding herself both an orphan and a matriarch following the death of her mother; musings on her tendency to regret the past; thoughts on how not to be afraid of loneliness; appreciation for the inner tomboy; and celebratory advice on how to regard "senior moments" as opportunities to be in the here and now.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In her mid-60s, Bay Area Zen practitioner Moon, former editor of the Buddhist Peace Fellowship’s Turning Wheel magazine, writes, “I wanted to look right into the face of oldness. What is it?” Gentle essays are grouped into three sections: mind/body, relationships, and spirit. Moon uses detail vividly in her determination to make peace with the many failures of brain and body (from forgetting her Social Security number to wondering if she’ll ever have sex again), though not all readers may want to follow her into the intricacies of retinal detachment and an elderly mother on a ventilator. Her best writing occurs when memory, emotion, and spirit coalesce as she recovers parts of herself left behind in childhood or comes to terms with solitude. Overall, the book is long on dignity but a bit short on both Zen and humor, focusing on earnest self-disclosure. But Moon’s honesty about the inner and outer realities of aging conveys an urgent reminder of inevitable loss; indeed, as she reminds us, “I am not getting old alone.” (June)
From the Publisher
“Moon is like a Buddhist Anne Lamott--confronting her life bravely and unapologetically. Reading as a man in his mid-sixties, [I] welcomed her honest ambivalence about aging. Her style is conversational yet often beautifully vivid and clear.”— New York Journal of Books

 “A funny, honest, and deeply personal book.  This collection of confessional essays makes for absorbing reading.”—Mandala magazine

“Refreshingly honest and enlightening. In this sterling collection of essays, Susan Moon looks at the rewards, blessings, drawbacks, and challenges of aging.  We are so grateful that Moon has written this insightful book in which she passes on what all this has meant to her.”—Spirituality & Practice

“Gentle essays . . . long on dignity.  Moon uses detail vividly in her determination to make peace with the many failures of brain and body (from forgetting her Social Security number to wondering if she’ll ever have sex again). Her best writing occurs when memory, emotion, and spirit coalesce as she recovers parts of herself left behind in childhood or comes to terms with solitude.”—Publishers Weekly

“Moon shares stories of her journey, providing on each page the deep intimacy experienced with an old friend over a cup of tea, the kind that satisfies and leaves you wanting more.  She plunges below the surface to explore grief, depression, loneliness, and peace, without losing her characteristic wry humor and infectious delight.  And in the process, her stories become our stories.”—Turning Wheel (The Buddhist Peace Fellowship) 

“[Moon] does not shy away from any aspect of aging, from sore knees to foggy memory, but also maintains a sassy sense of humor.  Perhaps if more people were as open about aging as Moon is, we shouldn’t all be so uncomfortable with the idea. This is a great read for anyone pondering the future.”— Sacramento Book Review

“This is a book about aging, but it’s not at all depressing.  Susan Moon is a very funny lady.  Moon shows us aging in a breathtakingly honest way.  I found that I liked her more and more as the book unfolded.  This Is Getting Old is beautiful, warm . . . existential.”—Wildmind.org

“Moon’s stories are wonderful companions and guides as I go about my ordinary life.”—Maxine Hong Kingston

“Aging is the biggest issue facing me and everyone I know. This book is poignant, funny, and spot-on, and I am tremendously grateful to Susan Moon for writing it. I love this book!”—Sylvia Boorstein, author of Happiness Is an Inside Job

"This Is Getting Old is a sweet, mellow, funny, wise, sad, and deeply affecting book. Susan Moon's essays are so disarmingly honest, so personal and plain, that they will make you forget what an astonishingly rare and profound achievement this is."—Norman Fischer, author of Sailing Home and Taking Our Places

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590307762
  • Publisher: Shambhala Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 6/8/2010
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 191,928
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Moon is a writer and longtime Zen Buddhist who teaches popular writing workshops, mostly in California. She is the former editor of Turning Wheel: The Journal of Socially Engaged Buddhism. She lives in Berkeley, California.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction ix

Part 1 Cracks in the Mind and Body

Where Did I Put My Begging Bowl? 3

Stain on the Sky 10

Leaving the Lotus Position 21

The Breathing Tube 26

Old Bones 40

All Fall Down 49

Senior Moment, Wonderful Moment 55

Part 2 Changing Relationships

In the Shade of My Own Tree 61

Exchanging Self and Other 70

House of Commons 79

Getting Good at Staying Still 85

Grandmother Mind 93

What If I Never Have Sex Again? 99

Becoming Invisible 103

The Tomboy Returns 108

Part 3 In the Realm of the Spirit

Tea with God 119

I Wasn't My Self 122

You Can't Take It with You 133

The Secret Place 138

Talking to My Dead Mother 144

For the Time Being 153

Alone with Everyone 160

This Vast Life 168

Acknowledgments 173

Credits and Permissions 175

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2011

    Excellent

    This is a wonderful book from start to finish. My only criticism is that I did not want it to stop. I am not sure that I would want to call it "humorous", although there is plenty of humor. It is more of a description of a personal journey that is easy for anyone to relate to, regardless of gender, philosophy, religion, etc.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2010

    I loved this book!

    Thank you Susan Moon! She who was never planning to get old, has certainly found the words, grace, humor and wisdom to have crafted a wonderful collection of essays on the very subject. I am not a Buddhist, nor do I understand Zen, but I was captivated by Susan's ideas, and her courage to be so honest in her own questions about it. This has joined my favorites list, it was an enjoyable read, but one I put down several times to think. I kept thinking I'd like to meet this woman, I think I'd like her.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This is getting real should be the title

    A very real, warm, insightful glimpse into Susan's real life. It was comforting for me to read that someone else shared my experiences as an older woman including the fact that I rarely feel "old" at all. It is nearly as if Susan was by my side at times. It's a feel-good read. Meditattive. I highly recommend. Thank you, Susan!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)