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This is the Day!
     

This is the Day!

by Phillis Gershator, Marjorie A. Priceman (Illustrator)
 

Babies: adorable, irresistible, lovable babies. And they are waiting for you to kiss their toes, sing them lullabies, and rock them to sleep. All you have to do is make room on your bike, or your ship, or your hot-air balloon! Sing along, because this is the day we give babies away—tra la and fiddle de dee.

Overview

Babies: adorable, irresistible, lovable babies. And they are waiting for you to kiss their toes, sing them lullabies, and rock them to sleep. All you have to do is make room on your bike, or your ship, or your hot-air balloon! Sing along, because this is the day we give babies away—tra la and fiddle de dee.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Priceman's dreamlike watercolors are a joy to behold, and Gershator's adaptation of the song retains a buoyant musical quality.
—Kirkus 9/1/07 Kirkus Reviews

"Gershator's cheery adaptation of a traditional song from the 1900s is perfectly complemented by Priceman's breezy watercolor illustrations." SLJ Nov/07 School Library Journal

"[V]isually oriented children may enjoy spotting the various ways that Priceman pays homage to Ludwig Bemelmans..." PW 10/29/07 Publishers Weekly

"The fanciful verses roll along." Booklist 02/15/08 Booklist, ALA

Publishers Weekly

An adaptation of a turn-of-the-century song, this picture book depends heavily on Priceman's (Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin) festively colored, Madeline-inspired compositions to tamp down the confusion or anxiety that the text may otherwise elicit from its preschool audience. "Monday's the day we give babies away/ with a half a pound of tea," the book begins, with a scene of dozens of babies in blue or pink hooded footies gamboling in their tiny beds, a dog loyally barking as a woman embraces the baby she's chosen, a matron dancing merrily in the background while her colleague (a tall Miss Clavel type, sans wimple) holds out a bag of tea leaves. In the absence of a story, kids will respond with questions. Just who is doing the giving and why are babies are being "given away" in the first place? If this book is about adoption (as the author's endnote suggests but the text does not make clear), why is it that only women get to pick out babies to take home? More visually oriented children may enjoy spotting the various ways that Priceman pays homage to Ludwig Bemelmans, from the set-up of the dining table to the appearance of the house, but the book's metaphorical whimsy seems most likely to please adults. Ages 3-6. (Oct.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature
A traditional song is adapted into a story of seven loving families and 28 adopted babies. A little bit of silliness and a whole lot of love is what you get from this fun, lively and entertaining story. Starting with Monday, when just one baby is adopted by a loving mother, the story takes us all the way through the week to Sunday, when a courageous woman agrees to adopt seven all at once. Brilliantly artistic watercolor illustrations are bright and busy, but most importantly, they capture the looks of parental love of the faces of each adopting family. The sing-song rhythm of the traditional song, provided in sheet music at the front of the book, is catchy and fun. Readers will easily be able to capture the attention of children individually or in a group and engage them in singing along. A sweet story on any given day, this could be incorporated into the classroom to introduce the idea of adoption when discussing the different ways families are formed, or when talking about babies in general (a favorite topic of many preschoolers, who are suddenly and keenly aware that they are no longer babies themselves). This touching story is enjoyable for all ages. Reviewer: Carly Reagan
School Library Journal

PreS-K Gershator's cheery adaptation of a traditional song from the 1900s is perfectly complemented by Priceman's breezy watercolor illustrations. A multitude of babies clad in hooded pink or blue pj's and tended by loving caretakers is waiting to be taken home. Each day the children are given away along with a special treat, such as "half a pound of tea" or "milk and cookies for free." On Monday, a woman chooses a bundle wrapped in blue, Tuesday's lady gladly takes a boy and a girl, Wednesday's new mother flies away with three little ones in her hot-air balloon, and so on, until the remaining seven tots gallop off on horseback with their smiling mom. Two splashy spreads illustrate each verse, first by introducing the day of the week and then concluding with the mother departing with her adopted young. The text swoops through the idyllic indoor and outdoor scenes to create a lyrical, joyous, and somewhat silly mood. The characters represent a variety of races and nationalities, and blended families are the norm. Sharp-eyed readers will observe that the picture for each day includes an animal that has the same number of offspring as those taken by the human mother. This pleasant romp is a natural for baby sing-along programs (sheet music is included), one-on-one sharing, and lullaby time.-Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT

Kirkus Reviews
Counting, adding, and the days of the week are introduced in this quirky traditional song about babies and adoption. "Monday's the day we give babies away with half a pound of tea," it begins. The mildly nonsensical rhyming text curls around the swirling illustrations as ladies of various races (some seemingly single and some not) visit a Bemelmans-inspired home for infants and adopt consecutively growing numbers of babies. When the final prospective mother declares, "Seven is heaven," the ladies relax in a circle, lovingly playing with all of their tots. Priceman's dreamlike watercolors are a joy to behold, and Gershator's adaptation of the song retains a buoyant musical quality. While adoption itself receives a relatively light treatment here-each set of babies is accompanied by a whimsical gift such as milk and cookies or a bear and a honeybee-young listeners will come away with the idea that each child is very much wanted and all of the new families are filled with warmth and love. Includes an author's note on the song's origins. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618497461
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/01/2007
Edition description:
None
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
3 Months to 3 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
Priceman's dreamlike watercolors are a joy to behold, and Gershator's adaptation of the song retains a buoyant musical quality.
—Kirkus 9/1/07 Kirkus Reviews

"Gershator's cheery adaptation of a traditional song from the 1900s is perfectly complemented by Priceman's breezy watercolor illustrations." SLJ Nov/07 School Library Journal

"[V]isually oriented children may enjoy spotting the various ways that Priceman pays homage to Ludwig Bemelmans..." PW 10/29/07 Publishers Weekly

"The fanciful verses roll along." Booklist 02/15/08 Booklist ALA

Meet the Author

Marjorie Priceman has illustrated many books for children, including the Caldecott Honor-winning books Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin and Hot Air: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Hot-Air Balloon Ride. Marjorie lives in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

Phillis Gershator was inspired by a traditional song to tell this story about twenty-eight babies and seven happy adoptions. A former children's librarian, she is also the author of several books for young readers, including Sky Sweeper, The Babysitter Sings, and Rata-Pata-Fata-Scata. Phillis lives with her husband, her frequent coauthor, on the island of St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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