BN.com Gift Guide

This Means War!

( 6 )

Overview

October 1962. Juliet Klostermeyer's world is turning upside down. All she hears from her parents and teachers and on the news is the Russian threat and the Cuban Missile Crisis. And things aren't much better at home. Her best friend, Lowell, doesn't seem interested in being her friend anymore—he'd rather hang out with the new boys instead. When Patsy moves in, things are looking up. Patsy is fearless, and she challenges the neighborhood boys to see who's better, stronger faster: a war between the boys and the ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $3.00   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
This Means War!

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.76
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

October 1962. Juliet Klostermeyer's world is turning upside down. All she hears from her parents and teachers and on the news is the Russian threat and the Cuban Missile Crisis. And things aren't much better at home. Her best friend, Lowell, doesn't seem interested in being her friend anymore—he'd rather hang out with the new boys instead. When Patsy moves in, things are looking up. Patsy is fearless, and she challenges the neighborhood boys to see who's better, stronger faster: a war between the boys and the girls. All the talk of war makes Juliet uneasy. As the challenges become more and more dangerous, Juliet has to decide what she stands for—and what's worth fighting for.

This is a powerful middle-grade coming of age novel from teen powerhouse Ellen Wittlinger.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Fifth-grader Juliet cannot grasp why Lowell doesn't want to be her friend anymore, so when Patsy moves into her neighborhood, she happily befriends the loud, opinionated girl. Lowell seems relieved (“You have a girl to play with, and I have boys. That's how it's supposed to work.... Isn't it?”), but Juliet still feels hurt. When a neighborhood bully proposes a series of competitions between boys and girls, Juliet joins Patsy's team. Even though the tests are increasingly dangerous, readers might be surprised by the intense final face-off. Wittlinger (Parrotfish) raises many complex gender questions without being heavy-handed: can boys and girls be friends as they get older? Are traditional girl activities like dancing as athletic as stereotypical boy ones like hitting a baseball? Readers will find it easy to root for Juliet, both as she competes and as she sorts out her relationships with sensitive Lowell and the often pushy Patsy. The book's backdrop—an Air Force town during the Cuban Missile Crisis—ratchets up the anxiety and clearly places the children in a critical moment between childhood and the adult world. Ages 10-14. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
"The characters are solid and believable, while the dialogue is fresh, poignant and funny. The children’s fear about the end of the world is realistically portrayed, yet Wittlinger never lets it overshadow the good-humored story of friendship. Will appeal to fans of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor’s The Boys Start the War (1993) and The Girls Get Even (1994).—Kirkus Reviews

"Wittlinger raises many complex gender questions without being heavy-handed...Readers will find it easy to root for Juliet, both as she competes and as she sorts out her relationships with sensitive Lowell and the often pushy Patsy. The book's backdrop—an Air Force town during the Cuban Missile Crisis—ratchets up the anxiety and clearly places the children in a critical moment between childhood and the adult world."—Publishers Weekly

"Wittlinger conveys a sober knowingness that shadows and deepens the seemingly bland innocence of 1960s girlhood...and her prose has the same bracing good sense and down-to-earth humor of her main character. A fine addition to the growing shelf of novels set during the Cuban Missile Crisis."—The Horn Book

"Wittlinger latches on to a poignant metaphor for war in this lively and readable tale...a clever concept that keeps the proceedings fun even as the darker drama of potential world collaps provides a weighty element...A warm way to introduce the cold war."—Booklist

"The childrens' face-off reflects the 1962 Soviet/American stand-off in Cuba, an episode that fills the children in this miltary community with both bravado and dread and raises the tone of the novel well above the standard "boys are idiots; girls have cooties" plitting. Wittlinger has a keen eye for 'tween age dynamics...Decades may have elapsed, but boys vs. girls and nation vs. nation never goes out of fashion."—BCCB

Children's Literature - Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger
Juliet does not understand why her best friend, Lowell, no longer has time for her. After years of friendship, he now is always with the other boys. But that is not the only thing bothering Juliet. She worries about her parents and their store. They seem to argue more and more, and they are worried about their store. Then there is the threat of war with the Cuban missile crisis filtering into lives all through the town. The whole town seems to be changing, with new people moving in and some families discussing bomb shelters. Juliet's more immediate concern, though, is the battle between the girls and the boys. The challenges become more difficult and more dangerous, even as the reality of the Cold War becomes closer and more frightening. Will the challenges create real danger for Juliet and her friends? And will the result bring her friend back to her or drive him further away? A good story to help preteens and young teens discuss shifting friendships and changes in relationships. Also a good way to address the tensions of the Cold War. Reviewer: Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger
School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—Lowell has long been 10-year-old Juliet's best friend, but after two Air Force-brat brothers move into their Illinois town, she is persona non grata. She befriends another newcomer, Patsy, whose father also works at the local airfield, and soon the girls and the boys form teams of four bent on challenging one another to prove whether girls are as capable as boys. The plot moves swiftly as Bruce, mean and older, and Patsy, outspoken and competitive, rally their opposing teams into increasingly risky and dangerous tests, including jumping out of a tree and shoplifting. Juliet's parents are occupied with trials of their own. As owners of a local grocery store, they are on edge about the appearance in town of supermarkets. They scare Juliet by arguing at the dinner table about whether President Kennedy will lead the United States into war over the recent Cuban missile crisis. Juliet finally gets their attention after Bruce resorts to arson to beat the girls' team, and she and Lowell brave heavy smoke to save Patsy from a burning barn. The Cold War underlies all, seeping into Juliet's fifth-grade classroom discussions and also into the atmosphere of her friend's underground bomb shelter. These details add realism and substance to an engaging novel that would be a step up for readers of Phyllis R. Naylor's Hartford and Malloy books (Delacorte).—Susan W. Hunter, Riverside Middle School, Springfield, VT
Kirkus Reviews
It's the fall of 1962. With Soviet missiles in Cuba, a war with Russia seems imminent. Amid community-wide fears of annihilation, Juliet Klostermeyer is experiencing her own personal problem. Her longtime best friend Lowell has decided it is uncool to be friends with a girl. Friendless for the first time, Julia meets Patsy, a spunky Air Force brat new to town. Patsy's father is a mechanic on the nearby base. When Patsy learns of Lowell's transgression and his new friends' attitude that girls are inferior, she suggests a series of tests to prove the boys wrong. As the standoff between Kennedy and Khrushchev intensifies, so does the war between the sexes. When their final test provokes a near-tragedy, both sides come to realize what is really important. The characters are solid and believable, while the dialogue is fresh, poignant and funny. The children's fear about the end of the world is realistically portrayed, yet Wittlinger never lets it overshadow the good-humored story of friendship. Will appeal to fans of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's The Boys Start the War (1993) and The Girls Get Even (1994). (Historical fiction. 8-12)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416971016
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 4/20/2010
  • Pages: 211
  • Sales rank: 984,600
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 740L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Ellen Wittlinger is the critically acclaimed author of the teen novels Love & Lies: Marisol's Story, Parrotfish, Blind Faith, Sandpiper, Heart on My Sleeve, Zigzag, and Hard Love (an American Library Association Michael L. Printz Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award winner), and the middle-grade novel Gracie's Girl. She has a bachelor's degree from Millikin University in Decatur, Illinois, and an M.F.A. from the University of Iowa. A former children's librarian, she lives with her husband in Haydenville, Massachusetts.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2013

    Lol

    Cool book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2013

    Lov i Lov me kk

    I i liked it but dork direies is better

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2014

    Dark angel

    Flipps back up and shrugs off the burned angel. I change my dagger nto a bow and arrow then i shoot one at ur shoulder*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2014

    Jackson

    He lashes out and catches Alex as he rolls by. He draws Excalibur amd Rexcalibur.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2014

    Alex

    Puts his hand around your ankle and scortches you, then thriws you back. He stands and prepares himself.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2012

    Heard of it.

    My classmate did a repot on this book and it seemed good

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)