This Next New Year

( 1 )

Overview

Celebrating the Chinese New Year

A young boy looks forward to Chinese New Year - also known as the Lunar New Year, the day of the first new moon. It is a time of hope, and you don't have to be Chinese to celebrate it! His best friend, Glenn, who is French and German, and his cousin Evelyn, part Hopi and part Mexican, like the food and the envelopes of money, while he celebrates the fresh start the day offers. He cleans the house to make room for luck, and is glad the palms of ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (16) from $10.83   
  • New (4) from $59.99   
  • Used (12) from $10.81   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$59.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$122.35
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(205)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 0374355037 New Condition ~~~ Right off the Shelf-BUY NOW & INCREASE IN KNOWLEDGE...

Ships from: Geneva, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$125.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$126.90
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(187)

Condition: New
0374355037 New. Looks like an interesting title!

Ships from: Naperville, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Celebrating the Chinese New Year

A young boy looks forward to Chinese New Year - also known as the Lunar New Year, the day of the first new moon. It is a time of hope, and you don't have to be Chinese to celebrate it! His best friend, Glenn, who is French and German, and his cousin Evelyn, part Hopi and part Mexican, like the food and the envelopes of money, while he celebrates the fresh start the day offers. He cleans the house to make room for luck, and is glad the palms of his hands itch - that means he is coming into money. Most of all, he vows not to say things such as "can't do / don't have / why me" because he has dreams he is ready to make come true. Janet S. Wong's spare, lyrical couplets voice a child's determination to face the new year with courage and optimism. Yangsook Choi captures the spirit of celebration in her vibrant, energetic pictures.

A family prepares to celebrate the Lunar New Year and looks forward to the good luck they hope it will bring.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Through a young boy's eves we experience the joys and anticipation leading up to the lunar New Year, the Chinese New Year. Lunar New Year is celebrated at a different time each year because it depends on when the new moon occurs. It is a time for hope and a second chance. A time to reach for your dreams. The protagonists best friends, a French and German boy and another who is part Hopi and part Mexican also celebrate the Chinese New Year. Lots of preparation is required. The boy helps his mother clean. He cleans himself and even flosses his teeth in preparation for the big holiday. When it arrives he promises to be brave and not cover his ears and hide his face during the lighting of the firecrackers. He is ready for his second chance, no negative thoughts. It is a new beginning. Yangsook Choi brings the celebration vividly to life with her bright, vibrant pictures. 2000, Frances Foster Books, Ages 3 to 5, $16.00. Reviewer: Leila Toledo
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A Chinese-Korean boy relates how he and his friends celebrate the "lunar new year, the day of the first new moon." One child celebrates the holiday with "Thai food to go," while a non-Asian child likes to get "-red envelopes stuffed with money from her neighbor who came from Singapore." The narrator's mother cooks a special Korean soup, and his family observes the traditions of house cleaning, lighting firecrackers, and being extra good to ensure a lucky new year. Wong carefully and clearly presents the reasons behind the rituals in a manner understandable to young children. She explains in an appended note about her own confusion as a child about the timing and meaning of the holiday. Choi's vibrant, somewhat primitive paintings realistically capture the details of and preparations for this hopeful time of year. Youngsters will enjoy the bright colors and the sense of motion and activity conveyed as the boy helps his mother clean, flosses his teeth, and cringes from the noise of the firecrackers. A good choice for anyone getting ready to celebrate Chinese New Year.-Anne Connor, Los Angeles Public Library Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The lunar new year doesn't begin on the first of January; it begins on the day of the first new moon. This celebration is commonly called the Chinese New Year but it is one celebrated by many cultures. A young boy (who is "half Korean") explains in a simple way his own family's traditions, which include a big bowl of duk gook, the Korean newyear soup, and then he tells about his friends. There's Glenn, "who is French and German" and "who celebrates . . . by eating Thai food to go." His other best friend Evelyn, "part Hopi and part Mexican," receives red envelopes "stuffed with money from her neighbor who came from Singapore." Going through his preparations, he literally cleans up the house, his clothes, and his own body, getting rid of all the bad luck to make room for the good. Wong's (Night Garden, 1999, etc.) poetic voice creates art from the ordinary: "A river of leaves from the plant that died even thought I meant to water it soon—gone." A new year vow becomes, "I will not say one awful thing, none of that, can't do, don't have, why me, because this is it, a fresh start, my second chance." Choi's (Nim and the War Effort, 1996, etc.) lively, twopage spreads in bright colors, perfectly complement the energetic text, adding visual reinforcement to the scenes described by the narrator. (author's note) (Picture book. 36)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780374355036
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 9/18/2000
  • Edition description: 1 ED
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.05 (w) x 10.20 (h) x 0.46 (d)

Meet the Author

Janet S. Wong lives in Medina, Washington.

Yangsook Choi lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2008

    Luck be a Reader

    Award-winning author and poet Janet S. Wong (Night Garden, Apple Pie 4th of July) has brought luck to her readers through this book. When you read this book, you can¿t help but let the words take you to a place of hope and new beginnings. This is the story of a little boy who is ready for the next lunar year, and tells about all of the traditions that take place in preparation. We watch him do everything from washing his hair to scrubbing between his toes so that last year¿s bad luck could be washed away and make room for this year¿s good luck to fill the crevasses. The artwork by Choi (The Name Jar) in this book was absolutely amazing, and as always very culturally appropriate. Her artwork is reflective of her Chinese background, down to the smallest details. She uses bold, bright colors that are sure to draw in the attention of even the most reluctant reader. This book allows people to start over, and try to follow through with some of the crazy resolutions that they have already given up on from January 1st. Overall, this book symbolizes not only a fresh start, but a renewed sense of hope for the future. I have become such a fan of Wong¿s writing because she is able to give so much meaning to children¿s books. She has such a graceful way with words, and she is very poetic. I think this book would be a great read aloud to begin the school year with, encourage the students to have a fresh start in September and set goals for the upcoming school year.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)