This Place on Third Avenue by John Mcnulty, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
This Place on Third Avenue

This Place on Third Avenue

by John Mcnulty
     
 
"No one came closer to catching the common parlance of New York in all its uncommonness than John McNulty." —Phillip Lopate

"This Place on Third Avenue is a gift of a book, long overdue, and with a tender and delicious memoir by Faith McNulty, John's widow... McNulty's characters are the ones you just chatted with in the street, the elevator, or, God

Overview

"No one came closer to catching the common parlance of New York in all its uncommonness than John McNulty." —Phillip Lopate

"This Place on Third Avenue is a gift of a book, long overdue, and with a tender and delicious memoir by Faith McNulty, John's widow... McNulty's characters are the ones you just chatted with in the street, the elevator, or, God help us, in the saloon. He shows us that wherever you look, there's a story."-Frank McCourt

"John McNulty, city man and newspaperman, self-assigned in his mature years to human-interest stories of the world around him, left a body of work that throbs with his love of life...American writing in our time developed few men with so keen an eye and so sharp an ear. [He] cannot be replaced."- James Thurber, in his New Yorker obituary of McNulty

Author Biography: From 1937 until his death in 1956, John McNulty walked many beats for The New Yorker, but his favorite—and the one that he made famous—was Tim & Joe Costello's, an old-fashioned Irish saloon at Third Avenue and Forty-fourth Street. The place is gone now—it was leveled and replaced by the lobby of a skyscraper in 1973-but it and its hard-living mid-century patrons live on in these twenty-eight immortal stories and sketches, many of them collected here for the first time.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
One of The New Yorker reporter-stylists who enlivened that magazine in the 1940s, McNulty (1895-1956) was best known for his humorous dispatches from an Irish saloon of quotable regulars on Third Avenue (the real-life Costello's on East 44th street). To readers, McNulty's characters became a sort of ensemble group, as indeed they were in life: there's the gruffly solicitous proprietor Tim Costello; Grady the aged cabbie; assorted horse players, "scratch bums," "sour beer artists," and a diminutive handyman called The Slugger "because he talks very furious whilst drunk ." These 26 New York profiles and saloon sketches from the Forties and Fifties show McNulty's perfect pitch for the uncommon speech of ordinary people. Like his better-known New Yorker colleagues A.J. Liebling and Joseph Mitchell, McNulty came from the world of newspapers, where one awed reporter observed that "just as dogs will make up with some people and not with others, the English language will do things for Mr. McNulty which it will not do for the rest of us." Perhaps the most deeply moving profile in the book, though, is the introductory memoir by his wife, Faith McNulty. For New York history and literary collections. Nathan Ward, "Library Journal" Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582432137
Publisher:
Counterpoint Press
Publication date:
05/28/2002
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
1,114,777
Product dimensions:
5.02(w) x 8.04(h) x 0.59(d)

What People are saying about this

Luc Sante
...pure East Side Irish-saloon jazz, ...with a sweetness that stays this side of sentimentality but is entirely unfiegned...
Frank McCourt
...a gift of a book, long overdue....McNulty's [characters] are the ones you just chatted with in the street, the elevator, or, God help us, the saloon.

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