This Thing of Ours: Investigating The Sopranos / Edition 1

This Thing of Ours: Investigating The Sopranos / Edition 1

by David Lavery
     
 

ISBN-10: 0231127812

ISBN-13: 9780231127813

Pub. Date: 09/11/2002

Publisher: Columbia University Press

In a first-season episode of The Sopranos, Tony Soprano is once again in conflict with his uncle Carrado "Junior" Soprano. Tony is in no mood for conciliation, but neither is Junior, who warns his nephew not to return unless he is armed: "Come heavy," he insists, "or not at all."

As a work of popular culture, a ground-breaking television series, and a

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Overview

In a first-season episode of The Sopranos, Tony Soprano is once again in conflict with his uncle Carrado "Junior" Soprano. Tony is in no mood for conciliation, but neither is Junior, who warns his nephew not to return unless he is armed: "Come heavy," he insists, "or not at all."

As a work of popular culture, a ground-breaking television series, and a cultural phenomenon, The Sopranos always "comes heavy," not just with weaponry but with significance. The cultures of the United States, Great Britain and Canada, Australia, and even Italy (where it premiered in the spring of 2001) have come under its influence and contributed to the cultural conversation about it. Talk, discourse, about The Sopranos has migrated far beyond the water cooler, and not all of it has been praise.

David Chase's The Sopranos has also received starkly contradictory critical assessments. In the eyes of Ellen Willis (whose seminal essay in The Nation is reprinted in this volume), for example, the HBO series is "the richest and most compelling piece of television—no, of popular culture—that I've encountered in the past twenty years... a meditation on the nature of morality, the possibility of redemption, and the legacy of Freud." Others have condemned it for racial and sexist stereotypes, excessive violence, and profanity. These eighteen essays consider many facets of The Sopranos: its creation and reception, the conflicting roles of men and women, the inner lives of the characters, obesity, North Jersey, the role of music, and even how food contributes to the story.

Columbia University Press

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231127813
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
09/11/2002
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
225
Product dimensions:
6.16(w) x 9.18(h) x 0.77(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Part I: Introductory Coming Heavy: The Significance of The Sopranos, by David LaveryOur Mobsters, Ourselves,, by Ellen WillisThe Sopranos: The Gangster Redux, by Albert AusterPart II: Men and Women "I dread you": Married to the Mob in The Godfather, Goodfellas, and The Sopranos, by Cindy Donatelli and Sharon Alward"Why Don't you take a look in the mirror, you insensitive prick": Weight, Body Image and Masculinity in The Sopranos, by Avi SantoOne for the Boys? The Sopranos and Its Male, British Audience, by Joanne Lacey"Cunnilingus and Psychoanalysis Have Brought Us To This": Livia and the Logic of Falsehoods, by Joseph S. WalkerPart III: The Media Context David Chase The Sopranos and Television Creativity, by David Lavery and Robert J. Thompson"TV Ruined the Movies'' Television, Tarantino, and The Intimate World of The Sopranos, by Glen CreeberWay North of New Jersey: A Canadian Experience of The Sopranos, by Dawn Elizabeth B. JohnstonNaked Bodies, Three Showings a Week, and No Commercials: The Sopranos as a Nuts-and-Bolts Triumph of Non-Network TV, by Paul LevinsonThe Sopranos as HBO Brand Equity: The Art of Commerce in the Age of Digital Reproduction, by Mark C. Rogers, Michael Epstein, and Jimmie ReevesPart IV: Genre, Narrative Technique, and Intertextuality Mobbed Up: The Sopranos and the Intertextual Gangster, by David PattieBeyond the Bada Bing!: Negotiating Female Narrative Authority in The Sopranos, by Kim Akass and Janet McCabeWiseguy Opera: Music for Sopranos, by Kevin FellezsPart V: Cultural Contexts No(rth Jersey) Sense of Place: The Cultural Geography (and Media Ecology) of The Sopranos, by Lance Strate"Soprano-speak": Language and Silence in The Sopranos, by Douglas L. HowardThe Eighteenth Brumaire of Tony Soprano, by Steven Hayward, and Andrew Biro"The Brutality of Meat" and "the Abruptness of Seafood": Food, Violence, and Family in The Sopranos, by Sara Lewis Dunne

Columbia University Press

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