This Time: New and Selected Poems

Overview

The poems in this substantial volume, the majority of which are no longer available in other editions, have been selected from seven previous collections 1971-95. Among favorite poems redeemed, readers will rejoice to find "Lucky Life." Stern also offers a generous array of new poems under such titles as "Self-Portrait in His Sixties," "The Sounds of Wagner," and "Both of Them Were Sixty-Five," a poem about a meeting between the author's mother and Aaron Copland. There are moving tributes to Larry Levis, ...
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Overview

The poems in this substantial volume, the majority of which are no longer available in other editions, have been selected from seven previous collections 1971-95. Among favorite poems redeemed, readers will rejoice to find "Lucky Life." Stern also offers a generous array of new poems under such titles as "Self-Portrait in His Sixties," "The Sounds of Wagner," and "Both of Them Were Sixty-Five," a poem about a meeting between the author's mother and Aaron Copland. There are moving tributes to Larry Levis, "Eggshell," and Allen Ginsberg, "Lilacs for Ginsberg." Throughout, Stern circles and addresses the themes that have always engaged him: love, hope, memory, and faith.
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Editorial Reviews

NY Times Book Review
[The book is] remarkable for its generosity of spirit, manifested in a warm surrealism that is often turned with humor toward his own past as a way of understanding the recurrent questions of growing old.
Memphis Commercial Appeal
It is a special pleasure to have Gerald Stern's This Time available in one volume....Stern is an observer and comic philsopher of simple riches.
New York Times Book Review
[The book is] remarkable for its generosity of spirit, manifested in a warm surrealism that is often turned with humor toward his own past as a way of understanding the recurrent questions of growing old.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
At once self-involved and sympathetic, Stern catalogues with wry dexterity a vast range of sensory data and cultural detritus, always united by 'women and men of all sizes and all ages/ living together, without satire.' This healthy collection of new poems and selections from his seven previous volumes (Odd Mercy) is remarkable for its generosity of spirit, manifested in a warm surrealism that is often turned with humor toward his own past ('My great specialty was darkness then/ and radiant sexual energy') as a way of understanding the recurrent questions of growing old: 'Why did it take so long/ for me to get lenient? What does it mean one life/ only?' The greatest joy here lies in the excellence of Stern's longer sentences, which recall Whitman in their life-like pulse and flow, in their subtle verbal patternings that submerge rhetorical artifice beneath the breath of actual speech. Stern's closing assessment of his poem 'Your Animal' is indicative of the ethics of the volume as a whole: 'It is my poem against the starving heart./ It is my victory over meanness.' When the poet warns, 'Nothing is too small for my sarcasm,' the counsel is a false snare; irony is not sarcasm, and it is Stern's ironic voice that allows for 'some understanding, some surcease,/ some permanence' without lapsing into lyric sentimentality.
Deborah Garrison
It is often you come across poetry that makes you want to turn to the stranger next to you on the bus, grab him by the collar, and say, 'You have to read this!'
The New Yorker
Memphis Commercial Appeal
It is a special pleasure to have Gerald Stern's This Time available in one volume....Stern is an observer and comic philsopher of simple riches.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402871719
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/28/1998
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.58 (w) x 9.49 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Meet the Author

Gerald Stern is the author of the National Book Award-winning This Time, the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize-winning Early Selected Poems, and other books. He has also been awarded the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the National Jewish Book Award, and the Wallace Stevens Award, among many other honors. He lives in Lambertville, New Jersey.

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Table of Contents

The Bite 17
This Is Lord Herbert Moaning 18
In Kovalchik's Garden 19
The Naming of Beasts 20
The Unity 21
His Animal Is Finally a Kind of Ape 22
The Poem of Life 24
When I Have Reached the Point of Suffocation 25
Immanuel Kant and the Hopi 27
Behaving Like a Jew 31
The Power of Maples 32
At Bickford's 33
Straus Park 34
On the Island 36
Burying an Animal on the Way to New York 38
The One Thing in Life 39
Let Me Please Look into My Window 40
Blue Skies, White Breasts, Green Trees 41
Three Tears 43
Lucky Life 45
Malaguena 47
Pile of Feathers 48
Gert's Gifts 49
Stepping Out of Poetry 50
Love for the Dog 51
This Is It 52
The Cemetery of Orange Trees in Crete 54
96 Vandam 55
Bob Summers: The Final Poem 56
God of Rain, God of Water 57
If You Saw Me Walking 59
Morning Harvest 60
Peddler's Village 62
The Sweetness of Life 63
Underground Dancing 64
Cow Worship 67
The Faces I Love 68
Little White Sister 69
Immensity 70
Rotten Angel 71
Pick and Poke 73
Modern Love 75
Little Did the Junco Know 77
Elaine Comparone 78
I Remember Galileo 80
The Shirt Poem 81
June First 85
Thinking About Shelley 86
Days of 1978 88
No Wind 89
June Fourth 90
Hanging Scroll 91
Acacia 93
Your Animal 95
The Rose Warehouse 97
The Red Coal 99
There Is Wind, There Are Matches 101
Waving Good-Bye 103
Dear Mole 104
The Roar 105
For Night to Come 106
Here I Am Walking 108
The Dancing 113
Orange Roses 114
Picking the Roses 115
In Memory of W. H. Auden 117
Romania, Romania 119
It's Nice to Think of Tears 120
Song 121
Weeping and Wailing 122
Christmas Sticks 123
The Same Moon Above Us 125
Leaving Another Kingdom 129
My Swallows 131
Bee Balm 133
Vivaldi Years 134
Moscow 135
Today a Leaf 136
Singing 137
John's Mysteries 138
Soap 141
I Pity the Wind 144
The Nettle Tree 146
Sycamore 147
Baja 151
Kissing Stieglitz Good-Bye 153
Fritz 155
Red Bird 157
Adler 159
The Expulsion 163
The Dog 169
All I Have Are the Tracks 171
I Do a Piece from Greece 172
This Was a Wonderful Night 173
I Sometimes Think of the Lamb 175
Stopping Schubert 176
Bela 177
A Song for the Romeos 180
My First Kinglet 181
There I Was One Day 183
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First Chapter

Chapter One
Eggshell
FOR LARRY LEVIS, 1946-1996
The color of life is an almost pale white robin's green
that once was bluer when it was in the nest,
before the jay deranged the straw and warm flesh
was in the shell. I found it while doing my forty-five
minute walk between two doors beside some
bushes and flowers. I put it in one of my pockets
keeping some space around it to protect
the pale green, an idiot carrying a dead
child inside him, something that might have broken out
anyway, a blue afterbirth shoved out of the
nest. I laid my dead like eggs on the table,
twelve tombstones to a box. I buried
dread that way, my telephone calls and letters,
and on the way I walked into a side yard
and straightened a brick--for it was May--and chased
a garter snake into his rainspout; and since it was morning
and it was hot already I put the eggshell
under a leather chair and thought of our trip
to New Orleans and used the end of a broom
to prop up a rosebush, the way we do, sweet Larry.
Lilacs for Ginsberg
I was most interested in what they looked like dead
and I could learn to love them so I waited
for three or four days until the brown set in
and there was a certain reverse curl to the leaf by
which in putting my finger on the main artery
beside the throat I knew the blood had passed on
to someplace else and he was talking to two
demons from the afterlife although it was
just like the mountains in New York State since there was
smoke in the sky and they were yelping and he was
speaking in his telltale New Jersey English
and saying the same thing over and over the way he
did when he was on stage and his white shirt was
perfect and the lack of air and of light
aged the lilacs but he was sitting on a lily
in one or two seconds and he forgot about Eighth Street
and fame and cancer and bent down to pick a loose
diamond but more important than that he talked
to the demons in French and sang with his tinny voice
nor did he go on about his yellowing sickness
but counted the clusters and said they were only stars
and there were two universes intertwined, the
white and the purple, or they were just crumbs or specks
that he could sprinkle on his pie nor could he
exactly remember his sorrow except when he pressed
the lilacs to his face or when he stooped
to bury himself in the bush, then for a moment
he almost did, for lilacs clear the mind
and all the elaborations are possible in their
dear smell and even his death which was so
good and thoughtful became, for a moment, sorrowful.
Lucky Life
Lucky life isn't one long string of horrors
and there are moments of peace, and pleasure, as I lie in between the blows
Lucky I don't have to wake up in Phillipsburg, New Jersey,
on the hill overlooking Union Square or the hill overlooking
Kuebler Brewery or the hill overlooking SS. Philip and James
but have my own hills and my own vistas to come back to,
Each year I go down to the island I add
one more year to the darkness;
and though I sit up with my dear friends
trying to separate the one year from the other,
this one from the last, that one from the former,
another from another,
after a while they all get lumped together,
the year we walked to Holgate,
the year our shoes got washed away,
the year it rained,
the year my tooth brought misery to us all.
This year was a crisis. I knew it when we pulled
the car onto the sand and looked for the key.
I knew it when we walked up the outside steps
and opened the hot icebox and began the struggle
with swollen drawers and I knew it when we laid out
the sheets and separated the clothes into piles
and I knew it when we made our first rush onto
the beach and I knew it when we finally sat
on the porch with coffee cups shaking in our hands.
My dream is I'm walking through Phillipsburg, New Jersey,
and I'm lost on South Main Street. I am trying to tell,
by memory, which statue of Christopher Columbus
I have to look for, the one with him slumped over
and lost in weariness or the one with him
vaguely guiding the way with a cross and globe in
one hand and a compass in the other.
My dream is I'm in the Eagle Hotel on Chamber Street
sitting at the oak bar, listening to two
obese veterans discussing Hawaii in 1942,
and reading the funny signs over the bottles.
My dream is I sleep upstairs over the honey locust
and sit on the side porch overlooking the stone culvert
with a whole new set of friends, mostly old and humorless.
Dear waves, what will you do for me this year?
Will you drown out my scream?
Will you let me rise through the fog?
Will you fill me with that old salt feeling?
Will you let me take my long steps in the cold sand?
Will you let me lie on the white bedspread and study
the black clouds with the blue holes in them?
Will you let me see the rusty trees and the old monoplanes one more year?
Will you still let me draw my sacred figures
and move the kites and the birds around with my dark mind?
Lucky life is like this. Lucky there is an ocean to come to.
Lucky you can judge yourself in this water.
Lucky you can be purified over and over again.
Lucky there is the same cleanliness for everyone.
Lucky life is like that. Lucky life. Oh lucky life.
Oh lucky lucky life. Lucky life.
The Dog
What I was doing with my white teeth exposed
like that on the side of the road I don't know,
and I don't know why I lay beside the sewer
so that lover of dead things could come back
with his pencil sharpened and his piece of white paper.
I was there for a good two hours whistling
dirges, shrieking a little, terrifying
hearts with my whimpering cries before I died
by pulling the one leg up and stiffening.
There is a look we have with the hair of the chin
curled in mid-air, there is a look with the belly
stopped in the midst of its greed. The lover of dead things
stoops to feel me, his hand is shaking. I know
his mouth is open and his glasses are slipping.
I think his pencil must be jerking and the terror
of smell--and sight--is overtaking him;
I know he has that terrified faraway look
that death brings--he is contemplating, I want him
to touch my forehead once and rub my muzzle
before he lifts me up and throws me into
that little valley. I hope he doesn't use
his shoe for fear of touching me; I know,
or used to know, the grasses down there; I think
I knew a hundred smells, I hope the dog's way
doesn't overtake him, one quick push,
barely that, and the mind freed, something else,
some other thing, to take its place. Great heart,
great human heart, keep loving me as you lift me,
give me your tears, great loving stranger, remember
the death of dogs, forgive the yapping, forgive
the shitting, let there be pity, give me your pity.
How could there be enough? I have given
my life for this, emotion has ruined me, oh lover,
I have exchanged my wildness--little tricks
with the mouth and feet, with the tail, my tongue is a parrot's,
I am a rampant horse, I am a lion,
I wait for the cookie, I snap my teeth--
as you have taught me, oh distant and brilliant and lonely.
I Remember Galileo
I remember Galileo describing the mind
as a piece of paper blown around by the wind,
and I loved the sight of it sticking to a tree
or jumping into the backseat of a car,
and for years I watched paper leap through my cities;
but yesterday I saw the mind was a squirrel caught crossing
Route 80 between the wheels of a giant truck,
dancing back and forth like a thin leaf,
or a frightened string, for only two seconds living
on the white concrete before he got away,
his life shortened by all that terror, his head
jerking, his yellow teeth ground down to dust.
It was the speed of the squirrel and his lowness to the ground,
his great purpose and the alertness of his dancing,
that showed me the difference between him and paper.
Paper will do in theory, when there is time
to sit back in a metal chair and study shadows;
but for this life I need a squirrel,
his clawed feet spread, his whole soul quivering,
the hot wind rushing through his hair,
the loud noise shaking him from head to tail.
O philosophical mind, O mind of paper, I need a squirrel
finishing his wild dash across the highway,
rushing up his green ungoverned hillside.
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