This Train: An Artist's Journal

This Train: An Artist's Journal

by Alex Kotlowitz
     
 

This Train: An Artist's Journal is like no other book written by Mr. Fitzpatrick. Unlike previous works, this book will include both high quality drawing collage images accompanied by corresponding essays produced over a sixteen-month period. Part memoir, part urban narrative, part socio-political commentary, each piece is a deeply personal and intellectual…  See more details below

Overview

This Train: An Artist's Journal is like no other book written by Mr. Fitzpatrick. Unlike previous works, this book will include both high quality drawing collage images accompanied by corresponding essays produced over a sixteen-month period. Part memoir, part urban narrative, part socio-political commentary, each piece is a deeply personal and intellectual contemplation of a broader American story. Fitzpatrick is without a doubt the contemporary voice of the workingman, following strongly in the tradition of both Nelson Algren and Studs Terkel. This Train: An Artist's Journey is the culmination of a nearly two-year meditation on the ideas and experiences that bind us to this land; it is a treatise on the American view from the bottom up.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Tony Fitzpatrick's drawing collages are the talismanic residue of a modern flaneur's journey through streets where the past and the present, the prosaic and the cosmic, coexist in a perceptual time-space continuum.”- Inside Art New Orleans

"The stories [in This Train] are humorous and touching. There are few great storytellers in this day and age, and Mr. Fitzpatrick has an undeniable gift to engage an audience. This Train is a rare piece of theatre that is not to be missed." -Chicago Critic

"Tony Fitzpatrick tells stories in the manner of his hero and friend, Studs Terkel, and I would gather that Studs is looking down on him with a big s--t grin on his face and having some great laughs.” -SteadyStyle Chicago

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780615385761
Publisher:
Firecat Publishing
Publication date:
12/10/2010
Pages:
180
Product dimensions:
9.80(w) x 12.20(h) x 0.80(d)

Read an Excerpt

"Everything in New Orleans is a good idea.”
-Bob Dylan, Chronicles, Volume One

This is a sad one for me. We in Chicago lost Koko Taylor this week. She was one of those genuine articles-a sturdy,
bewigged, gold-toothed tough girl who made a name for herself on grit, guts, and talent. A voice that sounds like something preserved in amber or dirty honey, a voice that can be cracked road and ether at the same time-Koko was a wrecking ball of heartbreak. I saw her often in Chicago and always got that chill one gets when bearing witness to the real thing. I get it a lot in New Orleans when I hear John Boutté sing, or Leroy Jones play "Soft Shoe,” or watch Paul Sanchez weave story and song as seamlessly as a mockingbird building a nest. They don't do it for money-they never did. They do it because they haven't any other choice. They are the thing they do. When you hear Koko sing, or Leroy play, or Paul perform, they are music itself-a long, continuing narrative that shifts the shape in voice, or instrument, of whoever is letting it free.

It was good being in New Orleans last week. I spent my whole visit without anyone, even once, bringing up the storm. What people are buzzing about is what's next. Prospect.2 is a short fifteen or so months away. New galleries are popping up,and there is a new and renewed optimism about this place.

As much fun as Jazz Fest, Mardi Gras, and Voodoo Fest are, I love New Orleans off-season in its quieter times. With its half-asleep, hazy beats slowed to a stroll, the place becomes more visible and strange, like a De Chirico cityscape of the imagination. Frenchmen Street and Bourbon are still hopping at night, but the rest of the Quarter is quiet like a Sunday morning before church services start and after the drunks have stumbled home. I like that New Orleans, too. If you get up early, or stay up late enough, you can see the oysters delivered to the Acme Oyster House in big burlap sacks, fresh every morning. You can drift by Croissant D'or and smell the baked bread from a block away. You can wander to the corner on Decatur to the Cafe Envie coffeehouse and see the walking wounded play chess, smoke, and try to keep from nodding off in the heat. A stroll down Royal Street is a history lesson with all of the antiques silently telling their own ghost stories in the shop windows.

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Meet the Author

Tony Fitzpatrick is an artist, poet, and actor whose artwork can be found in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the National Museum of American Art in Washington D.C., the Museum of Contemporary Art in North Miami, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Alex Kotlowitz is author of the bestselling There Are No Children Here: The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in the Other America, which won the Helen B. Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism, the Carl Sandburg Award and a Christopher Award. The New York Public Library selected There Are No Children Here as one of the 150 most important books of the century. Mr. Kotlowitz is also the author of The Other Side of the River: A Story of Two Towns, a Death and America's Dilemma, and most recently, Never a City So Real.

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