This Weary Way

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Ronnie D. Lankford
While Wayne Scott's name will probably be unfamiliar to most acoustic music lovers, they will nonetheless be familiar with his son, Darrell Scott, who has recorded several solo albums. This Weary Way, in fact, is a dream realized by father and son working in unison. Wayne Scott had long dreamed of recording and had even played country music in barrooms during the 1970s. It would be some 30 years down the line, though, before Scott, at 71, realized his dream thanks to the help of his son. Rich in country, folk, and blues, This Weary Way relies heavily on Wayne Scott's original songs and a talented cast of musicians to put the project across. The album opens with a ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Ronnie D. Lankford
While Wayne Scott's name will probably be unfamiliar to most acoustic music lovers, they will nonetheless be familiar with his son, Darrell Scott, who has recorded several solo albums. This Weary Way, in fact, is a dream realized by father and son working in unison. Wayne Scott had long dreamed of recording and had even played country music in barrooms during the 1970s. It would be some 30 years down the line, though, before Scott, at 71, realized his dream thanks to the help of his son. Rich in country, folk, and blues, This Weary Way relies heavily on Wayne Scott's original songs and a talented cast of musicians to put the project across. The album opens with a nice duet with Guy Clark on "It's the Whisky That Eases the Pain," a song that includes the great lines: "Eve told Adam that she had apples for sale/He bought the first one, I bought the last one, what the hell?" Interestingly, he follows with "Sunday with My Son," a song filled with the kind of homespun observations that Clark is known for. Wayne Scott's rustic, low-key vocals give his songs an air of authenticity, and the simple, mostly acoustic arrangements second this impression. From time to time, Scott reminds one of his country music idols. "The Writer" evokes Johnny Cash, while "What I Really Need Is You" recalls Hank Williams. There's also a live version of "Folsom Prison Blues" at the end of the album, and a good cover of the classic "Crash on the Highway." This Weary Way is an enjoyable, non-pretentious recording, and listeners will be glad that Scott finally got around to making it.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/30/2005
  • Label: Full Light Records
  • UPC: 829372000827
  • Catalog Number: 502
  • Sales rank: 300,149

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Wayne Scott Primary Artist, Vocals
Guy Clark Vocals, Guitar (Nylon String)
Verlon Thompson Acoustic Guitar, Mandolin, Vocals
Danny Thompson Double Bass
Dennis Crouch Double Bass, Upright Bass
Dan Dugmore Acoustic Guitar, Banjo, Pedal Steel Guitar, Electric Guitar
Nick Forster Electric Guitar
Kenny Malone Djembe
Tim O'Brien Mandolin, Vocals
Dirk Powell Banjo, Fiddle, Accordion
Suzy Ragsdale Vocals
Darrell Scott Acoustic Guitar, Banjo, Guitar, Mandolin, Pedal Steel Guitar, Electric Guitar, Vocals, Banjolin, Guitar (Resonator), Bowed Zither
Bill Schleicher Harmonica
Casey Driessen Fiddle
Bill Schleicher Harmonica
Technical Credits
Johnny Cash Composer
Randy LeRoy Mastering
Darrell Scott Composer, Producer, Liner Notes, Audio Production
Miles Wilkinson Engineer
Senor McGuire Cover Photo
Wayne Scott Composer, Liner Notes
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    ...and 1/2...Recreates a musical era of yesteryear's country music

    Playing Time - 44:05 -- Wayne Scott has a great deal of classic country soul. In fact, he seems about 50 or 60 years late in making this album. Born to play and sing, he grew up on a Kentucky tobacco farm in the 30s and 40s, and the old photos in the CD jacket show that he’s done his share of country music picking and singing. However, until now, he’d never really performed his own material that was inspired by the songs he covered from Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Lefty Frizzell and Merle Haggard. He presented some originals once in a bar but quickly realized that the people weren’t there to hear his songs. Orchestrated by one of his five kids, Darrell, “This Weary Way” recreates a different musical era…one not characterized by all the hype and glitter we typically see in country music today. Thus, armed with all but two originals, Wayne Scott sings life-affirming tales about being born, raised, working, drinking, loving and praying in the mountains. Fortunately, his son saw something special in his father’s songs and the feelings they express. Wayne’s country band toured for about 20 years, and Darrell learned to play guitar on stage for five sets a night with the group. Darrell’s own songs have been recorded by the likes of Garth Brooks, Dixie Chicks, Travis Tritt, Brad Paisley, Sara Evans and Patty Loveless. The aptitude for good songwriting must be in their genes. Darrell recognized that his father’s songs were simple, emotional, direct – all the essential rudiments of old country. Just listen to “What I Really Need is You” with its heartfelt music. Some stellar Nashville session musicians helped out on this project --Guy Clark, Dirk Powell, Tim O'Brien, Dennis Crouch, Dan Dugmore, Casey Driessen, Danny Thompson, and others. These guys know how to tap into the river of tradition, history, values and beliefs that ran through yesteryear’s country music. Building on this, Wayne Scott’s creates his own distinct image when he sings about family (“Sunday with my Son”), heartbreak (“It’s the Whiskey that Eases the Pain”), or salvation (“Sinner”). For a little more variety, I only wish that Wayne would have put a few more faster tempo’ed tunes like “In the Mountains” and “Since Jesus Came Into My Life” on the CD. (Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now)

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