Thomas Ken

Thomas Ken

by Frederick Arthur Clarke
     
 

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. TRAVEL AND FOREIGN RESIDENCE. I travelled among unknown men, In lands beyond the sea ; Nor, England ! did I know till then What love I bore to thee. --…  See more details below

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. TRAVEL AND FOREIGN RESIDENCE. I travelled among unknown men, In lands beyond the sea ; Nor, England ! did I know till then What love I bore to thee. -- Wordsworth. The quiet tenor of Ken's life was interrupted by a year or more of foreign travel in company with his nephew, Izaak Walton, now a young man of twenty-four. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the "grand tour " was an indispensable part of a liberal education; and though of course the journey was undertaken mainly for the sake of young Walton, Ken himself could not but profit from the experiences of his Wander- jah/r. In 1675, then, " he laid aside his books" (as Walton says of Sir Henry Wotton), " and betook himself to the useful library of travel, and a more general conversation with mankind." Our information concerning his travels is of the scantiest. Hawkins merely says, " he travelled through Italy, and to Rome." In Cotton's continuation of the Complete Angler, Piscator says, " young Master Izaak had been in France, and at Rome, and at Venice, and I can't tell where." We have really to make the same confession of ignorance, though Dean Plumptre has discovered several interestingindications of the course of Ken's travels in his later writings, and in his collection of books. But no reasonable doubt attaches to the visit to Italy. The " woman- country, wooed not wed," had not lost, if she has ever lost, that unique fascination for cultivated minds of which the life of Milton affords so striking an example: while the magnificence, the luxury and gaiety of the country, possibly even its reputed pre-eminence in splendid and reckless wickedness, attracted the vulgar sight-seer. Of Ken's personal interests and impressions, except in one important particular, we have no hint; and ...

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940025879480
Publisher:
Methuen & co
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
396 KB

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CHAPTER III. TRAVEL AND FOREIGN RESIDENCE. I travelled among unknown men, In lands beyond the sea ; Nor, England ! did I know till then What love I bore to thee. -- Wordsworth. The quiet tenor of Ken's life was interrupted by a year or more of foreign travel in company with his nephew, Izaak Walton, now a young man of twenty-four. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the "grand tour " was an indispensable part of a liberal education; and though of course the journey was undertaken mainly for the sake of young Walton, Ken himself could not but profit from the experiences of his Wander- jah/r. In 1675, then, " he laid aside his books" (as Walton says of Sir Henry Wotton), " and betook himself to the useful library of travel, and a more general conversation with mankind." Our information concerning his travels is of the scantiest. Hawkins merely says, " he travelled through Italy, and to Rome." In Cotton's continuation of the Complete Angler, Piscator says, " young Master Izaak had been in France, and at Rome, and at Venice, and I can't tell where." We have really to make the same confession of ignorance, though Dean Plumptre has discovered several interestingindications of the course of Ken's travels in his later writings, and in his collection of books. But no reasonable doubt attaches to the visit to Italy. The " woman- country, wooed not wed," had not lost, if she has ever lost, that unique fascination for cultivated minds of which the life of Milton affords so striking an example: while the magnificence, the luxury and gaiety of the country, possibly even its reputed pre-eminence in splendid and reckless wickedness, attracted the vulgar sight-seer. Of Ken's personalinterests and impressions, except in one important particular, we have no hint; and ...

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