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Thoreau's Garden
     

Thoreau's Garden

by Peter Loewer
 
THOREAU'S GARDEN is an imaginary place where the plants Thoreau knew in 19th-century
New England still thrive and where we can learn their history, their uses, and their charms. Well-known garden writer Peter Loewer profiles nearly 50 shrubs,
trees, grasses, flowering plants, fungi, and ferns, using generous excerpts from
Thoreau's journals and his own

Overview

THOREAU'S GARDEN is an imaginary place where the plants Thoreau knew in 19th-century
New England still thrive and where we can learn their history, their uses, and their charms. Well-known garden writer Peter Loewer profiles nearly 50 shrubs,
trees, grasses, flowering plants, fungi, and ferns, using generous excerpts from
Thoreau's journals and his own botanical illustrations and comments. Each essay mentions the use of the plant in cultivation, and conveys Thoreau's delight in the natural world and some interesting and unusual facts about the plants in his vicinity.

About the Author:

Peter Loewer is the author of many highly regarded books on gardening and natural history, including the award-winning THE WILD GARDENER and JEFFERSON'S GARDEN.
His botanical drawings are in the permanent collection of The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. He lives and teaches art in Asheville, North Carolina.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
"Thoreau's Garden" is an imaginary place where the plants Thoreau knew in 19th-century New England still thrive and where we can "learn their history, their uses, and their charms." Well-known garden writer Loewer (The Evening Garden, LJ 1/93) profiles nearly 50 shrubs, trees, grasses, flowering plants, fungi, and ferns, using generous excerpts from Thoreau's journals. Each essay mentions the use of the plant in cultivation, but in most instances this information is very limited compared with coverage in other books on natural gardening. This work's strength lies instead in its conveying Thoreau's delight in the natural world and some interesting and unusual facts about the plants in his vicinity. One learns, for example, that Jack-in-the-pulpit can grow to three feet high or that barberries were once widely made into jams and jellies. Recommended for natural history collections in most libraries, especially in the eastern half of the United States.Elizabeth Clewis Crim, Prince William P.L., Va.\

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781933523736
Publisher:
Bella Rosa Books
Publication date:
09/30/2009
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.58(d)

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