Overview

Old Man Fookwire's one pleasure in life is painting the birds in his backyard. When fall arrives and the birds fly south, Fookwire is desolate. The squirrels are curious: Where are the birds going, and what do they do once they get there? With their usual ingenuity and engineering skills, the squirrels devise a way to follow the birds to their destination, a tropical paradise. A wonderful time is had by all—all but grumpy Old Man Fookwire, alone at home. But the squirrels have a solution ...

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Those Darn Squirrels Fly South

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Overview

Old Man Fookwire's one pleasure in life is painting the birds in his backyard. When fall arrives and the birds fly south, Fookwire is desolate. The squirrels are curious: Where are the birds going, and what do they do once they get there? With their usual ingenuity and engineering skills, the squirrels devise a way to follow the birds to their destination, a tropical paradise. A wonderful time is had by all—all but grumpy Old Man Fookwire, alone at home. But the squirrels have a solution for that, too. Readers will revel in this third off-the-wall comedy featuring Old Man Fookwire, a lot of birds, and those darn squirrels.

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times
Like the previous volumes, Rubin and Salmieri's third Fookwire-squirrel saga is rich in clever language and unexpectedly humorous flourishes. Rubin and Salmieri don't care, it seems, if the story doesn't make any sense. And they don't care, it seems, that readers may have ambivalent feelings about Fookwire and even side with those darn squirrels. Really, it seems, what the authors care about most is making young children giggle uncontrollably…
—Pamela Paul
Publishers Weekly
It’s a sad time for Old Man Fookwire: his beloved birds are flying south for winter. And this year, the pesky squirrels that he loves to hate have decided to follow them, using flying machines that might have been designed by da Vinci (if he’d had access to soda bottles and baseball caps). Fookwire loads up his vintage convertible and joins the birds and squirrels in the tropical village of “Santa Vaca,” where even he manages to crack a smile. In the squirrels’ third outing, Rubin conveys the complexities of a testy relationship with flair, while Salmieri captures Fookwire’s grumpiness and the vacant expressions of the squirrels as they dance on the beach and prepare mangoes with salt and lime. Ages 4–8. Illustrator’s agent: Rebecca Sherman, Writers House. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
 "Visual slapstick and a deadpan text combine with trademark Fookwire expressions to make this third Darn Squirrels outing a winner . . . Hysterical—again."—Kirkus, starred review

"Rubin conveys the complexities of a testy relationship with flair."—Publishers Weekly

"Like the previous volumes, Rubin and Salmieri's third Fookwire-squirrel saga is rich in clever language and unexpectedly humorous flourishes."—New York Times online review

"This story doesn't disappoint."—School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Lisa Colozza Cocca
Silliness prevails in this book, the third in the "Those Darn Squirrels" series. Grumpy Old Man Fookwire loves the birds, but finds the squirrels to be just plain annoying. When fall comes, Fookwire is saddened by the upcoming departure of the birds. The squirrels, however, are extra-busy. They have decided to pass on another winter filled with knitting and ping pong in favor of a winter vacation. They want to check out where the birds go every winter, so they build a series of flying machines to get themselves there. When the first frost arrives, the birds, followed by the squirrels, head south. The squirrels have a great time on the beach, but when they see a bird that reminds them of Old Man Fookwire, they give him a call. Fookwire decides to join the birds and squirrels and packs up the car for the trip. Once he arrives at the beach, Fookwire spends his time painting in the hot sun. When the sun is too much for him the squirrels help Fookwire. Later, Fookwire and the squirrels climb into Fookwire's car for the trip back. The fun language, clever squirrels, grumpy protagonist, and hilarious illustrations will bring on a major case of the giggles in fans of the series as well as in newcomers. Reviewer: Lisa Colozza Cocca
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
"Those darn squirrels" and grumpy Old Man Fookwire return for another encounter. After a glorious summer painting his friends the birds, Fookwire sadly faces a long winter without them after they fly south. Of course the squirrels are usually still there. But this year the squirrels decide to follow the birds to see where they go. With their "comprehensive understanding of aerodynamic engineering," they construct an ingenious assortment of flying machines. So after the birds depart, the squirrels follow, to Fookwire's surprise. When they all arrive at the beach, the squirrels have a ball. But a bird reminds them of Fookwire, so they telephone him. He decides to join them all. When he arrives, he actually laughs. He paints the local birds with delight. Then he and the squirrels head back. The laughs begin with the jacket, where we see Fookwire with his elongated neck and carrot-like nose, observing the squirrels as they bask in the sun and climb a palm tree. An odd-looking tropical bird stands atop his bald head. Inside, cartoon-y watercolor, gouache, and colored pencil illustrations of the squirrels' creations and the fantastic tropical birds add to the fun. The final image of squirrels wildly driving the screaming Fookwire home hints of new encounters to come. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Those darn squirrels are at it again, and this time they're headed for warmer weather, aided by their "comprehensive understanding of aerodynamic engineering." In their third appearance, grumpy Old Man Fookwire is still painting pictures of his beloved birds and shaking his fist at squirrel shenanigans. But, instead of the baba, yaba, and floogle birds flying south alone, the squirrels tag along to see what all the fuss is about. When he receives a collect call from the squirrels turned beach bums, Fookwire's loneliness gets the better of him and he dusts off the red 1957 convertible he's kept hiding in a shed. After reuniting with his bird friends, sunburning his giant schnoz, and painting to his grumpy heart's content, he and the squirrels road trip it back together. Salmieri's characteristic sketches stretch every scene to humorous proportion, making the most of Rubin's quirky story line and eccentric vocabulary. As Fookwire would say, "Great googley-moogley," this story doesn't disappoint.—Jenna Boles, Washington-Centerville Public Library, OH
Kirkus Reviews
Birds of a feather (along with a cantankerous gentleman and his pesky squirrels) flock together at this tropical destination. Old Man Fookwire dips into a depression when his beloved feathered companions fly south. His impish squirrels take to the sky in makeshift machines (utilizing, in part, a pine cone and soda bottle) and follow the birds. After the squirrels call collect, Fookwire putters down the highway (at 12 mph) to join the birds and the pests. Once in Santa Vaca, he discovers the fiery coco, kiki and caramba birds and starts to paint them. Forgetting sunscreen and forgoing water, Mr. Fookwire turns tomato-red and suffers from heatstroke. The squirrels perform triage, fanning him with palm branches and dumping fluids into his parched mouth, before piling him into his sports car and driving him back north at record speeds. Fookwire's "Thooooooose daaaaaaarn squirrrrrels!" says it all about their love-hate relationship. Visual slapstick and a deadpan text combine with trademark Fookwire expressions ("great googly-moogly!") to make this third Darn Squirrels outing a winner. Watercolor, gouache and colored-pencil spreads pepper the beach with individual grains of sand. The birds' flamboyance (one a bird-sized replica of the ornery old man) is the perfect complement to the sweltering heat. Hysterical--again. (Picture book. 5-9)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547678412
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 9/11/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,224,671
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: AD670L (what's this?)
  • File size: 14 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Adam Rubin is a creative director for a digital advertising agency in New York City and the author of six critically acclaimed picture books, including three Those Darn Squirrels titles. All of them have been illustrated by Daniel Salmieri. To learn more, visit www.adamrubinhasawebsite.com.

Daniel Salmieri is an artist and illustrator living in Brooklyn, NY. He has illustrated eight books for children, including six critically acclaimed picture books in collaboration with author Adam Rubin. To learn more, visit www.danielsalmieri.com.

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