Thought And Feeling

Overview

Recently there has been growing awareness and acceptance of the proposition that people do not exist in a world of physically defined forces and events, but in a world defined by their own perceptions, cognitions, conclusions, and imaginations. We respond and react not to some objectively defined set of stimuli, but to our own apperceptions of stimuli that we define subjectively. The original essays in this volume center on one aspect of this process of attribution: The extent to which the perception of events ...

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Overview

Recently there has been growing awareness and acceptance of the proposition that people do not exist in a world of physically defined forces and events, but in a world defined by their own perceptions, cognitions, conclusions, and imaginations. We respond and react not to some objectively defined set of stimuli, but to our own apperceptions of stimuli that we define subjectively. The original essays in this volume center on one aspect of this process of attribution: The extent to which the perception of events and causes results in the determination, modification, or alteration of emotions, feelings, and affective states.

This book is divided into five sections, each of which elucidates and extends these theoretical conceptions. Part 1 provides a historical background and analytical framework for the rest of the book. Part 2 presents chapters dealing with the sorts of internal cues which may give rise to a feeling state. Part 3 presents a chapter discussing the evaluative needs aroused by the internal cues. Part 4 is concerned with the process of explanation triggered by the evaluative needs. Part 5 deals with various external cues and how they are used to label the internal feeling state. There is a concluding discussion of the cognitive alteration of feeling states.

The authors deal with aggression, boredom, obesity, the control of pain, and delusional systems. This volume is of continuing importance to clinical and experimental psychologists as well as social psychologists. Each of the authors takes the theoretical concept of cognition and relates it to research in biofeedback, physiology, social psychology, altered states of consciousness, etc. Thus, the book bridges the gap between cognitive theory and the use of that theory in applied research.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780202361765
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/15/2007
  • Pages: 252
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Meet the Author

Harvey London was associate professor in the Psychology Department at Long Island University. He was previously affiliated with Brandeis University and has been a visiting professor at Emory University and Hunter College. He has done extensive research work on several topics, including persuasion and psychological time.

Richard E. Nisbett is Theodore M. Newcomb Distinguished University Professor in the department of psychology at the University of Michigan. He is on the editorial board of Psychological Review, Cognition, Personality and Social Psychology Review, and Evolution and Human Behavior.

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Table of Contents


Contributors     ix
Introduction
Historical Background   Jerome E. Singer     3
Elements of Schachter's Cognitive Theory of Emotional States   Harvey London   Richard E. Nisbett     13
The Nature of Internal Cues
Influence of Future Choice Importance and Arousal Upon the Halo Effect   Edgar O'Neal     27
Individual Differences in Self-Attribution of Emotion   James Laird   Melvin Crosby     44
Cognitive Manipulation of GSR Extinction: Analogues for Conditioning Therapies   Karl P. Koenig   Kermit Henriksen     60
Cognitive Manipulation of Boredom   Harvey London   Lenore Monello     74
Evaluative Needs
Delusional Thinking and Cognitive Disorder   Brendan Maher     85
The Process of Explaining Internal Cues
Opportunity for Information Search and the Effect of False Heart Rate Feedback   John C. Barefoot   Ronald B. Straub     107
Persistent Effects of Information about Internal Reactions: Ineffectiveness of Debriefing   Stuart Valins     116
The Effects of External Cues
Cognition, Affect, and Psychopathology   Aaron Beck     127
Cognition and Self-Control: Cognitive Control of Painful Sensory Input   Nicholas P. Spanos   T. X. Barber   Gerald Lang     141
Self-Persuasion and Fear Reduction from Escape Behavior   George O. Klemp   Howard Leventhal     159
Perceived Anger Level, Instigating Agent, and Aggression   Leonard Berkowitz   Charles Turner     174
Cognitive and Social Determinants of Food Intake   Richard E. Nisbett   Michael D. Storms     190
Discussion
Cognitive Alteration of Feeling States: A Discussion   Daryl J. Bem     211
Index     235
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