Thoughts Are Things

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Overview

Spirit is a force and a mystery. All we know or may ever know of it is that it exists and is ever working and producing all results in physical things, seen of physical sense - and many more not so seen. What is seen, of any object - a tree, an animal, a stone, a man - is only a part of that tree, animal, stone or man. There is a force which, for a time, binds such objects together in the form you see them. The spiritual mind today sees, belonging to itself, a power for accomplishing any and all results in the ...
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Overview

Spirit is a force and a mystery. All we know or may ever know of it is that it exists and is ever working and producing all results in physical things, seen of physical sense - and many more not so seen. What is seen, of any object - a tree, an animal, a stone, a man - is only a part of that tree, animal, stone or man. There is a force which, for a time, binds such objects together in the form you see them. The spiritual mind today sees, belonging to itself, a power for accomplishing any and all results in the physical world, greater than the masses dream of. Life means the development in us of powers and pleasures, which fiction, in its highest flights, has never touched. This ever-acting, ever-varying force, which lies behind and, in a sense, creates all forms of matter, we call "spirit." We have, through knowledge, the wonderful power of using or directing this force, when we recognize it, and know that it exists, so as to bring us health, happiness and eternal peace of mind.

Prentice Mulford (1834-1891) was born in Sag Harbor, New York and was known as a comic lecturer, author of poems and essays. Mulford was instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.

Cover Photography by Paul Spremulli

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781434400758
  • Publisher: Wildside Press
  • Publication date: 4/23/2007
  • Pages: 120
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.28 (d)

Meet the Author

Prentice Mulford (1834-1891) was a noted literary humorist and California author. In addition, he helped found the New Thought movement.

Mulford was born in Sag Harbor, New York and, in 1856, sailed to California where he would spend the next 16 years. During this time, Mulford spent several years in mining towns, trying to find his fortune in gold, copper, or silver. After leaving the mining life, Mulford ran for a position on the California State Assembly in Sacramento. Although he was nominated, he ultimately lost the election. He returned to San Francisco and began writing for a weekly newspaper, The Golden Era. Mulford spent five years as a writer and editor for various papers and was named by many San Franciscans a "Bohemian," for his disregard for money. Mulford states in his autobiography, "poverty argued for us possession of more brains" (Prentice Mulford's Story 130). He became known for his humorous style of writing and vivid descriptions of both mining life as well as life at sea. In 1872, Mulford returned to New York City, where he became known as a comic lecturer, author of poems and essays, and a columnist for The New York Daily Graphic from 1875-1881. Mulford was also instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 18 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 2, 2010

    Many Typographical Errors, Otherwise, Somewhat Inspiring

    Someone goofed and the publishers put the book out into the market anyway. It's kind of like going to a restaurant and the waitress knows that your order is messed up, but she brings it to you anyway hoping that you won't notice the errors.

    However, once you hack through many of the typos, what you have left is some valuable information that will remain inert unless put into practice. I disagree with the author on many points and agree with many as well. There are some nuggets of information that I know will help me with my daily thinking and thought process. It's a short book--less than 130 pages and can be read in less than a week.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2011

    psuedo scientific writing.

    wishful thinking posing as scientific method. very skillful weaving of unrelated and weak data into a fabric that cannot be turned to any useful purpose. worse, she could be right.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2011

    fantastic book

    good book highly recommended .

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