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Thousand Cranes
     

Thousand Cranes

3.3 4
by Yasunari Kawabata, Edward G. Seidensticker (Translator)
 

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With a restraint that barely conceals the ferocity of his characters' passions, one of Japan's great postwar novelists tells the luminous story of Kikuji and the tea party he attends with Mrs. Ota, the rival of his dead father's mistress. A tale of desire, regret, and sensual nostalgia, every gesture has a meaning, and even the most fleeting touch or casual utterance

Overview

With a restraint that barely conceals the ferocity of his characters' passions, one of Japan's great postwar novelists tells the luminous story of Kikuji and the tea party he attends with Mrs. Ota, the rival of his dead father's mistress. A tale of desire, regret, and sensual nostalgia, every gesture has a meaning, and even the most fleeting touch or casual utterance has the power to illuminate entire lives—sometimes in the same moment that it destroys them. Translated from the Japanese by Edward G. Seidensticker.


"A novel of exquisite artistry...rich suggestibility...and a story that is human, vivid and moving."—New York Herald Tribune


Kawabata is a poet of the gentlest shades, of the evanescent, the imperceptible. This is a tragedy in soft focus, but its passions are fierce."—Commonweal

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A literary habitat like no other . . . quietly devastating fiction. . . . Behind a lyrical and understated surface, chaotic passions pulse.”
The Independent (London)
 
Thousand Cranes has the qualities of the best Japanese writing: a stunning economy, delicacy of feeling, and a painter’s sensitivity to the visible world.”
The Atlantic

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399505263
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
08/01/1981
Series:
The Perigee Japanese Library
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 5.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Yasunari Kawabata was born in Osaka in 1899. In 1968 he became the first Japanese writer to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature. One of Japan’s most distinguished novelists, he published his first stories while he was still in high school, graduating from Tokyo Imperial University in 1924. His short story “The Izu Dancer,” first published in 1925, appeared in The Atlantic Monthly in 1955. Kawabata authored numerous novels, including Snow Country (1956), which cemented his reputation as one of the preeminent voices of his time, as well as Thousand Cranes (1959), The Sound of the Mountain (1970), The Master of Go (1972), and Beauty and Sadness (1975). He served as the chairman of the P.E.N. Club of Japan for several years and in 1959 he was awarded the Goethe-medal in Frankfurt. Kawabata died in 1972.

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Thousand Cranes 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
first book iv read through in months, really i actually ate than read it. although the tea custom is quite lovely in tradition, the prose gets a little drippy insofar as silent reserve and subsequent misteps. a short, simple novella relieves ones own imagination some 3 hours.