Three About Thurston

Three About Thurston

by Susan Milord
     
 

Thurston is a rooster. Sometimes he is clever. Often he is cunning. You may find him sneaky. But he is always Thurston.

Thurston’s personality shines through in each of the three stories below.

• “Everything”: Thurston discovers a secret ingredient to make his soup extra delicious. • “Maybe, Maybe Not”:

Overview


Thurston is a rooster. Sometimes he is clever. Often he is cunning. You may find him sneaky. But he is always Thurston.

Thurston’s personality shines through in each of the three stories below.

• “Everything”: Thurston discovers a secret ingredient to make his soup extra delicious. • “Maybe, Maybe Not”: Thurston learns a lesson about the importance of chickens. • “In the Cards”: Thurston finds a foolproof way to never lose a game!

What will Thurston do next?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Bold, uncluttered illustrations provide visual punch lines for the minimalist text and leave no doubt that Thurston is one egocentric rooster." Horn Book

"The format and art style-with the fine black line and blocks of soothing colors-may recall James Marshall's George and Martha stories." Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly
Milord (Willa the Wonderful) recounts three vignettes in the life of an obtuse rooster named Thurston that each results in a punch line. In "Everything," Thurston finds a recipe for "Everything-but-the-Kitchen-Sink Soup." When the soup seems "to be lacking something," Thurston gamely adds his own ingredients, predictably, "including the kitchen sink!" (an illustration of the drain plug in the soup bowl and a hole where the sink was reinforce the joke). While a dot of the eye allows for some quizzical facial expressions and the bright colors will appeal to preschoolers, Milord's simple acrylic ink, watercolor and pencil illustrations seem at times repetitive. In the second incident ("Maybe, Maybe Not"), Thurston taunts his feathered friend Mirabelle: "Show me a chicken who says she can do something, and I'll show you a rooster who can do it better!" Thurston boasts. In the strongest denouement (albeit one that might appeal more to child-bearing adults than to children), Mirabelle turns the yolk on Thurston by holding out an egg and saying, "Your turn." The third episode delivers a dicey message when Thurston cheats at cards and then bolts when he realizes he still won't win ("I may not always win," he explains to readers, "but I never lose!"). The format and art style-with the fine black line and blocks of soothing colors-may recall James Marshall's George and Martha stories but, unfortunately, these tales lack the same pizzazz. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-The antics of a cocky rooster are featured in three vignettes. Thurston's "Everything-but-the-Kitchen-Sink Soup" includes an extra ingredient that is, not surprisingly, the kitchen sink. In "Maybe, Maybe Not," a crowd of poultry gathers to hear Thurston espouse his sexist beliefs: "Show me a chicken who says she can do something, and I'll show you a rooster who can do it better!" He gets his comeuppance when Mirabelle presents him with an egg. In the final episode, he cheats his way through a card game. Realizing his defeat is imminent, the sore loser throws the cards in the air and makes a hasty exit, boasting, "I may not always win-but I never lose!" The lighthearted cartoon illustrations depict comical, roly-poly barnyard fowl. Unfortunately, Thurston is an unappealing bird and much of the humor is negative.-Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Milord manages to pack three short riffs on the waggish, self-assured rooster Thurston into this quick picture book. The first has the rooster cooking up a pot of "Everything-but-the-Kitchen-Sink Soup," wherein Thurston decides to add the sink as well, giving the dish just what it was missing. Next, Thurston boasts the prowess of all roosters, the fact that they can do each and everything better than chickens, until he's handed an egg. " 'Your turn,' Mirabelle said" Lastly, he cheats at cards-no one ever said Thurston was an angel-in what is decidedly his least savory moment. He flees the table before getting skunked; he may not always win, but he never loses. Sure, Thurston. That last episode ought to spark some interesting discussions between readers and listeners, but that's Thurston: A rascal and a challenge. The artwork catches Thurston in all his pomposity-watercolors that feel like statements from Thurston's soapbox-throwing a broad, ironic humor over the proceedings. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618428502
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/04/2005
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author


Susan Milord lives in Norwich, Vermont, where she finds inspiration for her books all around her.

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