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The Three Bears
     

The Three Bears

2.5 4
by Paul Galdone
 

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This familiar nursery tale features a warmly appealing bear family and a naughty, gap-toothed Goldilocks.

Overview

This familiar nursery tale features a warmly appealing bear family and a naughty, gap-toothed Goldilocks.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-In this version of Paul Galdone's retelling of the classic tale (HM, 1972), the female narrator's voice is pleasant and expressive, with different inflections for the wee bear, the middle-sized bear, and the great big bear. The tape has audible page turning signals of a bear yawning or humming on one side, and no page turning signals on the other side. A light musical background accompanies the narration. This book and cassette package will be useful in day care centers, public libraries, and primary school libraries.-Diane Balodis, Alden Intermediate School, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher

"Four- to six-year-olds are sure to enjoy Paul Galdone's interpretation, and they should gain good visual concepts of size and of right to left from the delightful pictures and the use of various type sizes." --School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Elizabeth Fronk
With whimsical pen and ink drawings, Galdone brings a faithful retelling to the familiar story of the three bears living in the forest. Due to the bears' three sizes, Galdone shows very well the different sizes of bowls, chairs and beds. The size of text font also works nicely for beginning readers. One morning, the bears decide to walk in their woods as their porridge cools. While the bears are away, Goldilocks, a little girl, arrives. Again, Galdone's whimsy with a tooth missing and striped stockings, Goldilocks comes across as a childhood friend rather than some distant fairy tale heroine. She tries to make herself at home by tasting the porridge, trying the chairs and finally falling asleep in Wee Bear's bed. When the bears return, they discover they are not alone in their house. Goldilocks wakes up and runs from the rather startled residents. The story ends with our bears gazing knowingly out their window. This reissue works nicely for story-telling or for young readers. The repetition can also help those learning how to read. While other versions of the story exist, Galdone's remains faithful to the most common retelling, but adds delightful illustrations that can entertain preschool and early elementary readers. Reviewer: Elizabeth Fronk

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547772479
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/21/2011
Series:
Folk Tale Classics
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,074,802
Lexile:
AD490L (what's this?)
File size:
17 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"Four- to six-year-olds are sure to enjoy Paul Galdone's interpretation, and they should gain good visual concepts of size and of right to left from the delightful pictures and the use of various type sizes."—School Library Journal

Meet the Author

Paul Galdone was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1907 and emigrated to the United States in 1928. After finishing his studies at the Art Student League and the New York School of Industrial Design, Mr. Galdone worked in the art department of a major publishing house. There he was introduced to the process of bookmaking, an activity that was soon to become his lifelong career. Before his death in 1986, Mr. Galdone illustrated almost three hundred books, many of which he himself wrote or retold. He is fondly remembered for his contemporary style, bright earthy humor, and action-filled illustrations, which will continue to delight for generations to come.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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The Three Bears 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Mouser More than 1 year ago
Goldie Locks looks like a haunt and the "Daddy" bear looks like he was hit in the middle of his head with a two by four. The printing is off and makes the characters look bloodshot in some pictures. Of course, my grandson loves the story, but I would recommend a better illustrated one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
More than 25 years ago, I AND my little boy and girl adored this version.They would choose it again and again for bedtime read aloud. Since then I've purchased many additional copies for gifts. I disagree strongly with 'college student'. There is no need to have the text spell out what the pictures so surely communicate...the bears are family and each shows their own personality. The little girl, who wanders into a stranger's house and shows no consideration for their things, is NOT a sweet and innocent character. She is adventurous ( the opening picture of the house in the woods shows it as off by itself...mysterious...),impulsive and mischievous and looks darling portrayed that way. My kids always loved the final stare down between Goldilocks and the bears and the picture of her leaping out the window. I recommend this version highly.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was not impressed with Galdone's rendition of this classic tale. The pictures make it seem as though the bears are a family, but the text makes no comment on whether they are a family or not. The pictures many times do not seem to match the text. I found Galdone's illustration of Golidlocks somewhat disturbing, not a sweet little innocent girl, but a odd looking girl with quite peculiar clothing. I have never read of the bed's being to high at the head and feet; and the Middle-sized bear's chair did not look any softer then the great big bear's chair, which was supposedly hard. Do not use this book for to tell the classical tale. There are many good books out there on the Goldilocks and the three bears, this is not one of them.