Three Little Kittens

( 3 )

Overview

Young children all know the Mother Goose rhyme of the kittens who have lost their mittens, but they've never seen it illustrated with so much energy, beauty, and flair. Preschoolers will delight in these cuddly kittens as they frolic outside in the falling leaves, get their whiskers sticky while eating a just-baked apple pie, and do the washing-up under Mama Cat's watchful gaze.

Caldecott Medal-winning, New York Times bestselling author/artist Jerry Pinkney brings a gloriously ...

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Overview

Young children all know the Mother Goose rhyme of the kittens who have lost their mittens, but they've never seen it illustrated with so much energy, beauty, and flair. Preschoolers will delight in these cuddly kittens as they frolic outside in the falling leaves, get their whiskers sticky while eating a just-baked apple pie, and do the washing-up under Mama Cat's watchful gaze.

Caldecott Medal-winning, New York Times bestselling author/artist Jerry Pinkney brings a gloriously vivid palette, delightful details and tremendous warmth to his version of this favorite nursery rhyme.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
On the heels of his Caldecott win for The Lion & the Mouse, Pinkney offers another masterful visual interpretation of a classic narrative, albeit one with less gravitas. Wearing mittens newly knitted by their mother, the adorable and feisty kittens frolic outdoors with three birds (one sporting a woolen hat, one a striped scarf, one a shawl). Readers will delight in spotting dropped mittens among fallen leaves before the kittens announce their losses to their mother. Rendered in graphite, color pencil, and watercolor, Pinkney's sparkling-eyed young cats--in bows, bells, and lace--are almost impossibly (and perhaps overly) cuddly and precious, exuding boundless energy and capricious emotions. The author's tweaks of this rhyme lighten its tone slightly: the mother cat calls her kittens "careless" for losing their mittens and "silly" when they dirty them eating pie--never "naughty." Pinkney adds a sly final flourish: playing outside, one kitten has already dropped the knit cap that her mother has just given her. A cozy domestic drama set within a rich, autumnal wonderland that begs exploring. Ages 3–5. (Sept.)
Booklist
“Throughout, the sense of play is fun and contagious.”
Deseret News
“This familiar tale comes to life with vibrant illustrations that are full of action and warmth.”
The Plain Dealer
“Another winner from a most talented book creator.”
Children's Literature - Carrie Hane Hung
Caldecott medalist Jerry Pinkney presents his version of a familiar nursery rhyme about three kittens in this book. Detailed illustrations drawn with color pencils and watercolors are a joy to see while following the adventures of the playful kittens. The trio move from one problem and solution to the next one. First, the young cats lose their mittens when they play outside and frolic in the autumn leaves. Once they find their mittens, they wear them as they snack on some pie that their mother has baked. In the process, they soil their mittens with pie filling and decide to wash them. Young children will love chiming in with the meows and purrs found in colored print throughout the text. The pictures of the mother cat and the kittens are vivid and eye-catching. Children will have fun spotting the birds and toy mice in the illustrations. Don't forget to check the reverse side of the book jacket for the lyrics and music to the song about the three kittens. Reviewer: Carrie Hane Hung
School Library Journal
PreS—The well-known nursery rhyme gets the Pinkney touch in this sumptuous edition. The cherubic felines on the front cover invite readers to follow their mishaps from acquiring the mittens, to losing them, to finding them, to getting them all dirty, to washing them, and—judging from the exuberance of the final spread—losing them again. Pinkney's energetic kittens need every inch of each spread to tell their story. Their mother, who has been represented in past versions as rather fearsome when the kittens confess their carelessness, is gentler here, although clearly long-suffering. Still, she has a sighing patience that children will find comforting. The ability of the youngsters to turn their carelessness into play (finding the lost mittens becomes a counting game, and they seem to have as much fun washing the pie-covered mittens as they did getting them dirty in the first place) is a hidden charm to the rhyme that is developed here; details such as a red cardinal reflected in a stray bubble escaping the washing tub has more "cheer" than "chore" in it. The palette of autumn colors is warm, despite the evidence of mittens and scarves, and the use of white space for the background makes the illustrations sparkle. This is another superb entry in the artist's catalog of classics for a new generation.—Kara Schaff Dean, Walpole Public Library, MA
Kirkus Reviews

Originally published in 1978, this Booker short-listed novel chronicles fraught interactions between and within the Marsh and Frayling families during the summer of 1936.

Because her mother has just had another baby, eight-year-old Margaret Marsh is allowed a special treat on Wednesdays: a trip to the seaside and surrounding woods with Lydia, the family's maid. There isn't much fun in the Marsh household, because they belong to a strict fundamentalist sect, the Primal Saints. Elinor Marsh converted when she married Kenneth on the rebound from a romance with Charles Frayling, whose snobbish mother forbade her Cambridge-educated son to marry a dustman's daughter. Mrs. Frayling is dying now; Charles and his sister Binkie, estranged from her since the fight over Elinor, live in a house of their own not too far from the family manor. Gardam (The Man in the Wooden Hat, 2009, etc.) slips in and out of their various consciousnesses to delineate a tangled set of relationships. For all his religious fervor, Kenneth lusts after Lydia, tough-as-nails product of an abused childhood. Elinor, now much more self-confident than the shy working-class girl who adored Charles, flees from her husband to the Frayling siblings, but Charles has long since realized he's not really interested in sex of any kind. Observing all this mystifying adult activity is intelligent, angry Margaret, whose reckless walk along the rocks as the tide sweeps in provides the novel's climax. As usual, Gardam requires very few pages to delineate an entire world of class-ridden prejudice and the blighting effect it has on every character. Yet each one is so achingly vulnerable, and depicted with such empathy, that it's a relief to be reminded in a final chapter set 12 years later that people are surprisingly resilient and can make the best of even the most unpromising circumstances.

Another finely detailed, shrewdly observed and unsentimentally moving portrait of English life from two-time Whitbread Award winner Gardam.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803735330
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/30/2010
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 552,161
  • Lexile: 460L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 10.52 (w) x 11.26 (h) x 0.43 (d)

Meet the Author

Jerry Pinkney, winner of the 2010 Caldecott Medal, is also a five-time Caldecott Honor winner. He lives in Croton-on-Hudson, New York.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 26, 2012

    liked but returned

    The illustrations of this book were beautiful, as are all of Jerry Pinkney's books. I returned the book however, since it was not the text I prefer. I bought a different version.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 27, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    My daughter picked this book at her school as part of the Birthday Book Club. She would check it out almost weekly from the school library. So we decided to buy it for her that way she could read it whenever she wanted!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2012

    A beautiful book!

    My little two-year-old friend loved this book and asked her grandpa to read it over and over again. The illustrations are delightful. I highly recommend it for the toddler set.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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