The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig by Eugene Trivizas, Helen Oxenbury |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig

The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig

3.9 12
by Eugene Trivizas, Helen Oxenbury
     
 

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A hilarious retelling of the traditional story. It's time for the three little wolves to go out on their own, so off they go to build themselves a sturdy brick house. They hadn't reckoned on a big bad pig with a sledgehammer! Oxenbury's enchanting watercolor illustrations, full of delightful details, will entertain all ages.

Overview

A hilarious retelling of the traditional story. It's time for the three little wolves to go out on their own, so off they go to build themselves a sturdy brick house. They hadn't reckoned on a big bad pig with a sledgehammer! Oxenbury's enchanting watercolor illustrations, full of delightful details, will entertain all ages.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
ISBN 0-689-81528-X. PW's starred review applauded the "laugh-out-loud results" of this talented team's clever interpretation, calling it "among the wittiest fractured fairy tales around." Ages 5-10. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-``Once upon a time, there were three cuddly little wolves with soft fur and fluffy tails....'' They go out into the world to build a house for themselves only to be menaced by a big bad pig. In a clever switch on the familiar counterparts, these sweet-faced innocents use brick, concrete, and steel constructions, but their nemesis is not called big and bad for nothing. With sledgehammer, pneumatic drill, and dynamite, the pig wrecks each structure. ``Something must be wrong with our building materials,'' the wolves muse. Their final house is build from flowers, insubstantial yet beautiful. It is their lovely scent that causes the pig to change his nasty ways and all live together as friends happily ever after. The text has the repeating situations and phrases from the traditional version. Oxenbury's pastel watercolor illustrations combine the coziness of a nursery tale with tongue-in-cheek humor. They are animated and full of personality. Children familiar with The Three Little Pigs will enjoy the turnabout, the narrow escapes, and the harmonious ending. This may also be used to inspire them to develop their own adaptations of classic tales.-Karen James, Louisville Free Public Library, KY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689815287
Publisher:
Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date:
04/01/1997
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
51,119
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 12.00(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
700L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Helen Oxenbury is the renowned illustrator of many classic picture books, including We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen and The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig by Eugene Trivizas. Ms. Oxenbury lives with her husband, illustrator John Burningham, in North London.

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The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Storywraps More than 1 year ago
What a wonderful twist on a very beloved, familiar fairytale.  Mommy wolf is portrayed at the beginning of the book with her hair in curlers, her toenails polished and giving advice to her young cubs to go out and build their homes but beware of the big bad pig!  I have to admit I loved the pig's character the very best.  He is this big hulking, menacing looking thug that is up to no good and determined to destroy the houses of the wolves.  There was however charm and charisma in that roly-poly form that made me like him. The wolves start out building a brick house and then graduate to stronger and stronger fortresses because it seems the bad old pig can always outsmart them and take their houses down, not by huffing and puffing but by using a sledgehammer, a pneumatic drill and finally....dynamite.   Kids will laugh at his resourcefulness and cunningness as he outsmarts those little wolves and sends them packing from house to house.  Finally, at their wits end, the wolves totally change their strategy of what materials to use, and ask a passing flamingo if they could use his "flowers" to construct their new home.  They creatively design this amazing fragrant house and what happens then will change the pigs life forever.  Miracles can happen, hard hearts can be softened and enemies can be coverted into lifelong friends.  The illustrations are charming, full of expression and wit and could tell the story all on their own.  This is a brilliant story with a fun turn of events that will have both kids and adults alike laughing out loud and cheering those little wolves on to success.  Everyone loves a happy ending....and they all lived happily ever after....the perfect ending to a fairy tale indeed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a preschool teacher, and I teach a unit on 3 Little Pig story variations each year. This book has been the favorite each year, and is so much fun for my class. I highly recommend it!
Lily_Beauxdilly More than 1 year ago
This book turns the tables on the 3 Little Pigs, and instead consists of three gentle wolves terrorized by one big bad pig! Its a great twist and the extremes the wolves and the pig go to are hilarious and unexpected. Both boys and girls will get a kick out of their antics. They eventually resort to peaceful co-existence and it is interesting to see how they become friends in the end. My 7 year old enjoys this book a lot, I'm not sure that a child younger than 4 would really understand some of the ways the wolves protect themselves and the destructive ways the pig gets to them. Not every child maybe knows what a pneumatic drill is but it definitely looks impressive! The artwork is very detailed and lends a lot to the story. Seeing things destroyed and blown up is probably amusing to most kids and I'd recommend this book to almost anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Padfoot19 More than 1 year ago
This is fun book with a twist on on a classic. My 2.5 yr old wanted to hear it every day for about two weeks!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of my all time favourites. I have been reading it to preschoolers (and any adults who will listen) since it was published. The message is of persistence during extremely difficult circumstances (don't forget to rescue the china teapot!) I hope the reviewer who threw the book away gets it out of the bin and tries to see the beauty in this retelling. Children learn from many sources - one book will not teach them that an evil person can be changed with sweet smelling flowers, but it will start them on the path to acceptance of others.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this book. It's fun to read and introduces kids to a lot of words that you don't use in everyday conversation. How can you not love a story that has a pneumatic drill in it??
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this story has a really different perspective from the original tale of the three little pigs and the big bad wolf. I think this is a good book for a little older kids because there is some violence like a sledgehammer, a pneumatic drill, and dynamite. I think it is a little violence for really young children. But a very fun and entertaining story to read. I really enjoyed it and I hope you do too.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Funny, charming, and an wildly entertaining, both for children and adults. A wonderful spin on a classic, told from a really different perspective. I never knew that wolves were so refined, so polite, and so sophisticated! The artwork is gorgeous. My students adore this book and ask me to read it again and again. They drink in at all the fine detail in the watercolor pictures, and they are tickled with the twist on the original fairy tale with which they are so familiar. I marvel and chuckle at the use of words and phrases like 'pneumatic drill,' a comical and sharp contrast to the delicate and dainty language in the descriptions of the wolves and their activities. The pig uses the jackhammer, which poses a poignant and sharp contrast to the refined wolves' beloved and very delicate china teapot. In a word, this book is brilliant.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story has children looking at a classic story from a different point of view. It is a great story to use for comparing and contrasting. I highly recommend this book. It is a great way to introduce children to the language arts skills of comparing, contasting and what is similar.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bought this book on line for my grandson, I stopped reading the book halfway through and threw the book away.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I REALLY DISLIKED this book. I was innocently reading this book to my children at bedtime. The big, bad pig is terribly mean, putting me in mind of a terrorist, destroying every really well fortified house the wolves build for no purpose. Just when I'm feeling stressed both as the reader and for my small children listening, the solution to the problem is given. The terrorized wolves remove all safety precautions taken in building their home and instead build a home of flowers, which makes the pig nice and sweet and their friend. I felt this gave my children a completely unrealistic view of REALLY BAD people. Sometimes people are really evil (like this pig), both criminals and terrorists and planting flowers and being nice will not always protect you from them. I actually threw the book away so as not to be responsible for anyone else reading such a harmful message. I give this one negative stars!