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Three Men in a Boat [ By: Jerome K. Jerome ]
     

Three Men in a Boat [ By: Jerome K. Jerome ]

4.1 75
by Jerome K. Jerome
 

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The story begins by introducing George, Harris, 'J.' (the narrator) and Montmorency, the dog. The men are spending an evening in J.'s room, smoking and discussing illnesses they fancy they suffer from. They conclude they are all suffering from 'overwork' and need a holiday. A stay in the country and a sea trip are both considered, then rejected (J. describes the bad

Overview

The story begins by introducing George, Harris, 'J.' (the narrator) and Montmorency, the dog. The men are spending an evening in J.'s room, smoking and discussing illnesses they fancy they suffer from. They conclude they are all suffering from 'overwork' and need a holiday. A stay in the country and a sea trip are both considered, then rejected (J. describes the bad experiences had by his brother-in-law and a friend on sea trips). Eventually, the three decide on a boating holiday, up the River Thames, from Kingston upon Thames to Oxford, during which they'll camp, notwithstanding J.'s anecdotes regarding previous mishaps with tents and camping stoves.

They embark the following Saturday. George must go to work that morning ("George goes to sleep at a bank from ten to four each day, except Saturdays, when they wake him up and put him outside at two") so J. and Harris make their way to Kingston by train. They are unable to find the correct train at Waterloo Station (the station's confusing layout was a well-known theme of Victorian comedy) so they bribe a train driver to take his train to Kingston, where they collect their hired boat and start their journey. They meet George later, up-river at Weybridge.

The remainder of the story relates their river journey and the incidents that occur. The book's original purpose as a guidebook is apparent as the narrator describes the passing landmarks and villages such as Hampton Court Palace, Hampton Church, Monkey Island, Magna Carta Island and Marlow, and muses upon historical associations of these places. However, he frequently digresses into anecdotes that range from the unreliability of barometers for weather forecasting to the difficulties that may be encountered when learning to play the Scottish bagpipe. The most frequent topics are river pastimes such as fishing and boating and the difficulties they present to the inexperienced and unwary.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012193773
Publisher:
Publish This, LLC
Publication date:
04/02/2008
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
208 KB

Meet the Author

English writer and humorist, best known for the humorous travelogue Three Men in a Boat. Other works include the essay collections Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow and Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow; Three Men on the Bummel, a sequel to Three Men in a Boat; and several other novels.

In 1877, Jerome had decided to try his hand at acting, under the stage name Harold Crichton. After three years on the road and with no evident success, a 21 year old Jerome decided he had had enough with stage life, and sought other occupations. He tried to become a journalist, writing essays, satires and short stories, but most of these were rejected. Over the next few years he was a school teacher, a packer, and a solicitor’s clerk. Finally, in 1885, he had some success with On the Stage — and Off, a humorous book whose publication opened the door for more plays and essays. Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, a collection of humorous essays, followed in 1886.

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Three Men in a Boat 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 75 reviews.
bookbearTN More than 1 year ago
This title came to me from a book store in Durham NC. They were about to have a local author review it. The thing that interested me most is that it was published 120 yrs. ago and has Never been out of print. Yet, it is just as interesting now as it was then. The one major drawback for me was that the book didn't include a map of the river area where the characters were boating. The author originally planned this book as a travel narrative. He decided that he should add some characters to make it more palatable. He added himself and a couple of friends. And the dog, which I didn't think added appreciably to the book, regardless of the cover blurb. What he winds up with is an interesting mish-mnash of travelogue and stream of consciousness chatter. Not boring. Mostly not laugh-out-loud. Just a nice fun read. Good hammock reading. A good pick to keep in your purse to read in waiting rooms and such.
Wunna More than 1 year ago
Every page of the book is fun to read. period.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I got this as a present after I'd been raving about Connie Willis' 'To say Nothing of the Dog' and it is a very nice and comic book. It covers a trip up the Thames in 1888 (I think) and the adventures had. Possibly the funniest bit is the German singer and everyone laughing at his tragic song because someone tells them it's a comic song. It's worth the read.
Joel_M More than 1 year ago
I loved this classic tale of three Victorian slackers boating on the Thames. The first-person narration of their bumbling pleasure trip up and down the river is filled with dry humor, frequent rabbit trails, and the occasional overly-flowery Victorian paragraph. Jerome K. Jerome's humorous style has clearly influenced other British writers such as Douglas Adams (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) and Terry Pratchett (Discworld). This is a must read of any fan of British humor.
DarlynneV More than 1 year ago
The story is great, a classic. But the digital formatting of this free edition makes the book hard to read. Spending .99 or 1.99 for a formatted copy would be worthwhile.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This has been digitized from a print edition. It has so many typos it's not worth reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
InTheBookcase More than 1 year ago
"Three Men in a Boat" is a hilarious volume, filled with boating adventures and witty ramblings. It all begins when a trio of grown men "decide" they are quite ill and that a sea trip is just the thing to cure them. If you don't mind casting away with a coterie of half-lunatics, then you're in for a treat. The self-diagnosis of various ailments gets a person chuckling. The ridiculous arguments get a person guffawing. The trailing stories that the main character tells get a person outright laughing. The descriptions of England and the curiosities that the trio encountered are just delightful. The bizarre antics of three crazy men (and a dog) are splendid. Everything is precisely British, and oh!---how I wish for a nice row down the Thames right about now.
batjargon More than 1 year ago
This is a delightful account of three men taking a boat trip through England’s little towns. Unlike most novels written so long ago it does not waste a great deal of words on tedious talk for the sake of talk, though there is a great deal of talking and musing in it. It just isn’t dull. This is a funny read that has remained funny through time.
Tartuffe More than 1 year ago
A laugh-at-loud account of the exploits of three English gentlemen who decide to while away their idle plying the waters of the Thames and its tributaries. Renting a small boat, which they fill with three years-and-a-day's worth of supplies, they set off. By turns pushing, pulling and rowing they make their way through a maze of channels splicing the English countryside, all the while stumbling and bumbling their way through one misadventure after another. A smart, funny book well worth the hour or two it takes to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was one of the first books printed (in translation) in post-WWII Germany. I loved it as a child and still love it as a "Senior Reader". The dry humor and the reminder of a kinder, gentler England are still very appealing.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A delightful read but text had spelling errors here and there. Or was that a part of the humour? ;)
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Fester More than 1 year ago
This is a charming little gem of a book - part comedy, part travel guide - an altoghether entertaining and amusing account of three adventurous young men in Victorian England who take a boat trip on the Thames River. Jerome K. Jerome's writing is similar to that of P.G. Wodehouse and he is often laugh-out-loud funny when relating the events of the trip.