THREE MEN IN A BOAT (Bestseller Special NOOK Edition) by JEROME K. JEROME Worldwide Bestselling Comedy Fiction [#2 of the Top 50 Funniest Books Ever Written] Nook Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) by Jerome K. Jerome NOOKBook Humor [NOOK Book]

Overview

THREE MEN IN A BOAT
(Bestseller Special NOOK Edition)
by JEROME K. JEROME

Worldwide ...
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THREE MEN IN A BOAT (Bestseller Special NOOK Edition) by JEROME K. JEROME Worldwide Bestselling Comedy Fiction [#2 of the Top 50 Funniest Books Ever Written] Nook Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) by Jerome K. Jerome NOOKBook Humor

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Overview

THREE MEN IN A BOAT
(Bestseller Special NOOK Edition)
by JEROME K. JEROME

Worldwide Bestselling Comedy Fiction

#2 of Esquire's Top 50 Funniest Books Ever Written
#33 of the Guardian's Top 100 Novels of All Time


EXCERPT

"Harris asked me if I’d ever been in the maze at Hampton Court. He said he went in once to show somebody else the way. He had studied it up in a map, and it was so simple that it seemed foolish—hardly worth the twopence charged for admission. Harris said he thought that map must have been got up as a practical joke, because it wasn’t a bit like the real thing, and only misleading. It was a country cousin that Harris took in. He said:

“We’ll just go in here, so that you can say you’ve been, but it’s very simple. It’s absurd to call it a maze. You keep on taking the first turning to the right. We’ll just walk round for ten minutes, and then go and get some lunch.”

They met some people soon after they had got inside, who said they had been there for three-quarters of an hour, and had had about enough of it. Harris told them they could follow him, if they liked; he was just going in, and then should turn round and come out again. They said it was very kind of him, and fell behind, and followed.

They picked up various other people who wanted to get it over, as they went along, until they had absorbed all the persons in the maze. People who had given up all hopes of ever getting either in or out, or of ever seeing their home and friends again, plucked up courage at the sight of Harris and his party, and joined the procession, blessing him. Harris said he should judge there must have been twenty people, following him, in all; and one woman with a baby, who had been there all the morning, insisted on taking his arm, for fear of losing him.

Harris kept on turning to the right, but it seemed a long way, and his cousin said he supposed it was a very big maze.

“Oh, one of the largest in Europe,” said Harris.

“Yes, it must be,” replied the cousin, “because we’ve walked a good two miles already.”

Harris began to think it rather strange himself, but he held on until, at last, they passed the half of a penny bun on the ground that Harris’s cousin swore he had noticed there seven minutes ago. Harris said: “Oh, impossible!” but the woman with the baby said, “Not at all,” as she herself had taken it from the child, and thrown it down there, just before she met Harris. She also added that she wished she never had met Harris, and expressed an opinion that he was an impostor. That made Harris mad, and he produced his map, and explained his theory.

“The map may be all right enough,” said one of the party, “if you know whereabouts in it we are now.”

Harris didn’t know, and suggested that the best thing to do would be to go back to the entrance, and begin again. For the beginning again part of it there was not much enthusiasm; but with regard to the advisability of going back to the entrance there was complete unanimity, and so they turned, and trailed after Harris again, in the opposite direction. About ten minutes more passed, and then they found themselves in the centre.

Harris thought at first of pretending that that was what he had been aiming at; but the crowd looked dangerous, and he decided to treat it as an accident.

Anyhow, they had got something to start from then. They did know where they were, and the map was once more consulted, and the thing seemed simpler than ever, and off they started for the third time.

And three minutes later they were back in the centre again.

After that, they simply couldn’t get anywhere else. Whatever way they turned brought them back to the middle. It became so regular at length, that some of the people stopped there, and waited for the others to take a walk round, and come back to them. Harris drew out his map again, after a while, but the sight of it only infuriated the mob, and they told him to go and curl his hair with it. Harris said that he couldn’t help feeling that, to a certain extent, he had become unpopular."


FAVORITE PASSAGES

"Throw the lumber over, man! Let your boat of life be light, packed with only what you need—a homely home and simple pleasures, one or two friends, worth the name, someone to love and someone to love you, a cat, a dog, and a pipe or two, enough to eat and enough to wear, and a little more than enough to drink; for thirst is a dangerous thing."

"Everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses."
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Editorial Reviews

Esquire Magazine
#2 of the 50 Funniest Books Ever Written
The Guardian
#33 of the Top 100 Novels of All Time
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Jerome Klapka Jerome was an English writer and humorist, best known for the humorous travelogue Three Men in a Boat. Jerome was born in Caldmore, Walsall, England, and was brought up in poverty in London. He attended St Marylebone Grammar School

Other works include the essay collections Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow and Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow; Three Men on the Bummel, a sequel to Three Men in a Boat; and several other novels.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 83 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(41)

4 Star

(26)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(9)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 83 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2011

    Don't bother

    This has been digitized from a print edition. It has so many typos it's not worth reading.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 17, 2009

    Great book, great read and great author.

    Every page of the book is fun to read. period.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Fun Read

    This title came to me from a book store in Durham NC. They were about to have a local author review it. The thing that interested me most is that it was published 120 yrs. ago and has Never been out of print. Yet, it is just as interesting now as it was then. The one major drawback for me was that the book didn't include a map of the river area where the characters were boating.

    The author originally planned this book as a travel narrative. He decided that he should add some characters to make it more palatable. He added himself and a couple of friends. And the dog, which I didn't think added appreciably to the book, regardless of the cover blurb. What he winds up with is an interesting mish-mnash of travelogue and stream of consciousness chatter. Not boring. Mostly not laugh-out-loud. Just a nice fun read. Good hammock reading. A good pick to keep in your purse to read in waiting rooms and such.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2001

    Very Funny book

    I got this as a present after I'd been raving about Connie Willis' 'To say Nothing of the Dog' and it is a very nice and comic book. It covers a trip up the Thames in 1888 (I think) and the adventures had. Possibly the funniest bit is the German singer and everyone laughing at his tragic song because someone tells them it's a comic song. It's worth the read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2013

    A classic

    This should be reread annuallyy as an antidote to life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 5, 2012

    JUST TOO FUNNY!

    This book is just too funny! I cannot recommend it highly enough. This is just one nonstop laughter. I absolutely loved the ending.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 24, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A must-read for any fan of British deadpan humor

    I loved this classic tale of three Victorian slackers boating on the Thames. The first-person narration of their bumbling pleasure trip up and down the river is filled with dry humor, frequent rabbit trails, and the occasional overly-flowery Victorian paragraph.

    Jerome K. Jerome's humorous style has clearly influenced other British writers such as Douglas Adams (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) and Terry Pratchett (Discworld). This is a must read of any fan of British humor.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2011

    Laugh Out Funny!

    This book is laugh out funny ... a complete riot. Enough hilarious scenes to make anyone roll on the floor!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 23, 2011

    Poor Formatting

    The story is great, a classic. But the digital formatting of this free edition makes the book hard to read. Spending .99 or 1.99 for a formatted copy would be worthwhile.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    hilarious and a quick read...

    Three Men in a Boat is a very funny travelogue/comedy novel. It was very entertaining with all the misadventure that seemed to follow these fellows up the Thames. You never knew what might happen next. This book is well know for it's timeless feel. It was written in the 19th century but the writing and the humor seem ageless. It reminded me of a Bill Bryson travel book. Three Men in a Boat is lively and amusing, and a quick read too at under 200 pages.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 5, 2014

    "Three Men in a Boat" is a hilarious volume, filled wi

    "Three Men in a Boat" is a hilarious volume, filled with boating adventures and witty ramblings.

    It all begins when a trio of grown men "decide" they are quite ill and that a sea trip is just the thing to cure them. If you don't mind casting away with a coterie of half-lunatics, then you're in for a treat. The self-diagnosis of various ailments gets a person chuckling. The ridiculous arguments get a person guffawing. The trailing stories that the main character tells get a person outright laughing.

    The descriptions of England and the curiosities that the trio encountered are just delightful. The bizarre antics of three crazy men (and a dog) are splendid. Everything is precisely British, and oh!---how I wish for a nice row down the Thames right about now.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2014

    Recomand cu multa placere

    O carte pe care o devorezi cu zambetul pe buze.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 9, 2013

    This is a delightful account of three men taking a boat trip thr

    This is a delightful account of three men taking a boat trip through England’s little towns. Unlike most novels written so long ago it does not waste a great deal of words on tedious talk for the sake of talk, though there is a great deal of talking and musing in it. It just isn’t dull. This is a funny read that has remained funny through time.




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  • Posted March 8, 2013

    Highly entertaining

    A laugh-at-loud account of the exploits of three English gentlemen who decide to while away their idle plying the waters of the Thames and its tributaries. Renting a small boat, which they fill with three years-and-a-day's worth of supplies, they set off. By turns pushing, pulling and rowing they make their way through a maze of channels splicing the English countryside, all the while stumbling and bumbling their way through one misadventure after another. A smart, funny book well worth the hour or two it takes to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2013

    A classiic

    Well worth an annual rereading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2012

    Still a Delight!

    This was one of the first books printed (in translation) in post-WWII Germany. I loved it as a child and still love it as a "Senior Reader". The dry humor and the reminder of a kinder, gentler England are still very appealing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2012

    Misspellings?

    A delightful read but text had spelling errors here and there. Or was that a part of the humour? ;)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    Just Awesome! The FUNNIEST BOOK YOU WILL EVER READ!

    This is by far the funniest book that I have ever read. It had me laughing out loud in the bus, the subway and even in the sandwich shop. I can't believe I just discovered this book. 100% HILARIOUS!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    The Funniest Book in the World!

    If you are ever down or depressed, this is the book for you. This is the funniest book you will ever read and will have you in stitches as soon as you pick it up and start getting into the story. Absolutely hilarious!

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  • Posted November 27, 2011

    Delightful!

    This is a charming little gem of a book - part comedy, part travel guide - an altoghether entertaining and amusing account of three adventurous young men in Victorian England who take a boat trip on the Thames River. Jerome K. Jerome's writing is similar to that of P.G. Wodehouse and he is often laugh-out-loud funny when relating the events of the trip.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 83 Customer Reviews

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