Three men in a boat

Three men in a boat

4.1 75
by Mr Jerome K. Jerome
     
 

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The novel narrates the adventures of George, Harris, Jerome and the dog Montmorency, undertaking a trip on the Thames.

The book is sprinkled with comic anecdotes, but also philosophical reflections on life, the illusions that we have willingly on the world and ourselves, and the need not to load too much luxury the boat of his life.

Despite the reluctance of

Overview

The novel narrates the adventures of George, Harris, Jerome and the dog Montmorency, undertaking a trip on the Thames.

The book is sprinkled with comic anecdotes, but also philosophical reflections on life, the illusions that we have willingly on the world and ourselves, and the need not to load too much luxury the boat of his life.

Despite the reluctance of literary critics who accuse the author a style considered too popular, the book was a great success. To meet the demand, pirated copies will even sold in the United States.

Although the work has aimed to discover how pleasant the history of the Thames, it is comical anecdotes that make it successful and make the always popular book today.
PREFACE.

_The chief beauty of this book lies not so much in its literary style,
or in the extent and usefulness of the information it conveys, as in its simple truthfulness. Its pages form the record of events that really happened. All that has been done is to colour them; and,
for this, no extra charge has been made. George and Harris and
Montmorency are not poetic ideals, but things of flesh and blood especially George, who weighs about twelve stone. Other works may excel this in depth of thought and knowledge of human nature: other books may rival it in originality and size; but, for hopeless and incurable veracity, nothing yet discovered can surpass it. This,
more than all its other charms, will, it is felt, make the volume precious in the eye of the earnest reader; and will lend additional weight to the lesson that the story teaches.

LONDON, August, 1889.

CHAPTER I.

Three invalids. Sufferings of George and Harris.
A victim to one hundred and seven fatal maladies.Useful prescriptions.
Cure for liver complaint in children. We agree that we are overworked, and need rest.A week on the rolling deep? George suggests the River.
Montmorency lodges an objection.-Original motion carried by majority of three to one.

There were four of us-George, and William Samuel Harris, and myself, and
Montmorency. We were sitting in my room, smoking, and talking about how bad we were-bad from a medical point of view I mean, of course.

We were all feeling seedy, and we were getting quite nervous about it.
Harris said he felt such extraordinary fits of giddiness come over him at times, that he hardly knew what he was doing; and then George said that he had fits of giddiness too, and hardly knew what he was doing.
With me, it was my liver that was out of order. I knew it was my liver that was out of order, because I had just been reading a patent liver-pill circular, in which were detailed the various symptoms by which a man could tell when his liver was out of order. I had them all.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781500672591
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
07/30/2014
Pages:
184
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.39(d)

Meet the Author

Jerome Klapka Jerome says Jerome K. Jerome was born in Walsall (Staffordshire), England, May 2, 1859 and died in Northampton (Northamptonshire, England) June 14, 1927, is a British writer of humorous novels, best known for his book three men in a boat.
Jerome Klapka Jerome was the fourth child of Jerome Clapp (who changed his name to Jerome Clapp Jerome), an ironmonger and lay preacher Protestant and Margaret Jones (subsequent change "Clapp" Jerome Clapp Jerome son in "Klapka" seems inspired by the surname of Klapka, a Hungarian general exiled in England).
The family is initially easy, but the collapse of his father's business as a result of poor investment in a coal mine when he was only two years, the slides into poverty and debt. Hating school, he castigated repeatedly methods in his books, Jerome K. Jerome leaves fourteen because fatherless at the age of thirteen, then mother at the age of fifteen years it must provide itself with its needs and ambitions thwarted see a political or literary career. It then connects small jobs: it collects for four years coal fell beside the paths for the London and North Western Railway, he is a journalist, actor and teacher. However, finding the time to devote to writing.
His first book, On and off stage, was published in 1885 and will be followed by many other books, plays and newspaper articles. In 1886 appeared The Lazy lazy, its first small success Thoughts. But it is especially Three men in a boat, which appeared in 1889, which became known to the general public. The success is such that estimated one million pirated copies circulated in the world at the time. This book remains the best known of Jerome K. Jerome. However, he never met with critical acclaim. Max Beerbohm say including that he is a "tenth-rate writer who inundate us with its products tenth order," even though the Harrowsmith editor reeling under the effect of the request, stating ironically that the public must surely "eat the books."

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Three Men in a Boat 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 75 reviews.
bookbearTN More than 1 year ago
This title came to me from a book store in Durham NC. They were about to have a local author review it. The thing that interested me most is that it was published 120 yrs. ago and has Never been out of print. Yet, it is just as interesting now as it was then. The one major drawback for me was that the book didn't include a map of the river area where the characters were boating. The author originally planned this book as a travel narrative. He decided that he should add some characters to make it more palatable. He added himself and a couple of friends. And the dog, which I didn't think added appreciably to the book, regardless of the cover blurb. What he winds up with is an interesting mish-mnash of travelogue and stream of consciousness chatter. Not boring. Mostly not laugh-out-loud. Just a nice fun read. Good hammock reading. A good pick to keep in your purse to read in waiting rooms and such.
Wunna More than 1 year ago
Every page of the book is fun to read. period.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I got this as a present after I'd been raving about Connie Willis' 'To say Nothing of the Dog' and it is a very nice and comic book. It covers a trip up the Thames in 1888 (I think) and the adventures had. Possibly the funniest bit is the German singer and everyone laughing at his tragic song because someone tells them it's a comic song. It's worth the read.
Joel_M More than 1 year ago
I loved this classic tale of three Victorian slackers boating on the Thames. The first-person narration of their bumbling pleasure trip up and down the river is filled with dry humor, frequent rabbit trails, and the occasional overly-flowery Victorian paragraph. Jerome K. Jerome's humorous style has clearly influenced other British writers such as Douglas Adams (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) and Terry Pratchett (Discworld). This is a must read of any fan of British humor.
DarlynneV More than 1 year ago
The story is great, a classic. But the digital formatting of this free edition makes the book hard to read. Spending .99 or 1.99 for a formatted copy would be worthwhile.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This has been digitized from a print edition. It has so many typos it's not worth reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
InTheBookcase More than 1 year ago
"Three Men in a Boat" is a hilarious volume, filled with boating adventures and witty ramblings. It all begins when a trio of grown men "decide" they are quite ill and that a sea trip is just the thing to cure them. If you don't mind casting away with a coterie of half-lunatics, then you're in for a treat. The self-diagnosis of various ailments gets a person chuckling. The ridiculous arguments get a person guffawing. The trailing stories that the main character tells get a person outright laughing. The descriptions of England and the curiosities that the trio encountered are just delightful. The bizarre antics of three crazy men (and a dog) are splendid. Everything is precisely British, and oh!---how I wish for a nice row down the Thames right about now.
batjargon More than 1 year ago
This is a delightful account of three men taking a boat trip through England’s little towns. Unlike most novels written so long ago it does not waste a great deal of words on tedious talk for the sake of talk, though there is a great deal of talking and musing in it. It just isn’t dull. This is a funny read that has remained funny through time.
Tartuffe More than 1 year ago
A laugh-at-loud account of the exploits of three English gentlemen who decide to while away their idle plying the waters of the Thames and its tributaries. Renting a small boat, which they fill with three years-and-a-day's worth of supplies, they set off. By turns pushing, pulling and rowing they make their way through a maze of channels splicing the English countryside, all the while stumbling and bumbling their way through one misadventure after another. A smart, funny book well worth the hour or two it takes to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was one of the first books printed (in translation) in post-WWII Germany. I loved it as a child and still love it as a "Senior Reader". The dry humor and the reminder of a kinder, gentler England are still very appealing.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A delightful read but text had spelling errors here and there. Or was that a part of the humour? ;)
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Fester More than 1 year ago
This is a charming little gem of a book - part comedy, part travel guide - an altoghether entertaining and amusing account of three adventurous young men in Victorian England who take a boat trip on the Thames River. Jerome K. Jerome's writing is similar to that of P.G. Wodehouse and he is often laugh-out-loud funny when relating the events of the trip.