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THREE MEN IN A BOAT (Bestseller Special NOOK Edition) by JEROME K. JEROME Worldwide Bestselling Comedy Fiction [#2 of the Top 50 Funniest Books Ever Written] Nook Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) by Jerome K. Jerome NOOKBook Humor
     

THREE MEN IN A BOAT (Bestseller Special NOOK Edition) by JEROME K. JEROME Worldwide Bestselling Comedy Fiction [#2 of the Top 50 Funniest Books Ever Written] Nook Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) by Jerome K. Jerome NOOKBook Humor

by Jerome K. Jerome
 
THREE MEN IN A BOAT
(Bestseller Special NOOK Edition)
by JEROME K. JEROME

Worldwide Bestselling Comedy Fiction

#2 of Esquire's Top 50 Funniest Books Ever Written
#33 of the Guardian's Top 100 Novels of All Time


EXCERPT

"Harris asked me if I’d ever been in the maze at Hampton Court. He said he went in

Overview

THREE MEN IN A BOAT
(Bestseller Special NOOK Edition)
by JEROME K. JEROME

Worldwide Bestselling Comedy Fiction

#2 of Esquire's Top 50 Funniest Books Ever Written
#33 of the Guardian's Top 100 Novels of All Time


EXCERPT

"Harris asked me if I’d ever been in the maze at Hampton Court. He said he went in once to show somebody else the way. He had studied it up in a map, and it was so simple that it seemed foolish—hardly worth the twopence charged for admission. Harris said he thought that map must have been got up as a practical joke, because it wasn’t a bit like the real thing, and only misleading. It was a country cousin that Harris took in. He said:

“We’ll just go in here, so that you can say you’ve been, but it’s very simple. It’s absurd to call it a maze. You keep on taking the first turning to the right. We’ll just walk round for ten minutes, and then go and get some lunch.”

They met some people soon after they had got inside, who said they had been there for three-quarters of an hour, and had had about enough of it. Harris told them they could follow him, if they liked; he was just going in, and then should turn round and come out again. They said it was very kind of him, and fell behind, and followed.

They picked up various other people who wanted to get it over, as they went along, until they had absorbed all the persons in the maze. People who had given up all hopes of ever getting either in or out, or of ever seeing their home and friends again, plucked up courage at the sight of Harris and his party, and joined the procession, blessing him. Harris said he should judge there must have been twenty people, following him, in all; and one woman with a baby, who had been there all the morning, insisted on taking his arm, for fear of losing him.

Harris kept on turning to the right, but it seemed a long way, and his cousin said he supposed it was a very big maze.

“Oh, one of the largest in Europe,” said Harris.

“Yes, it must be,” replied the cousin, “because we’ve walked a good two miles already.”

Harris began to think it rather strange himself, but he held on until, at last, they passed the half of a penny bun on the ground that Harris’s cousin swore he had noticed there seven minutes ago. Harris said: “Oh, impossible!” but the woman with the baby said, “Not at all,” as she herself had taken it from the child, and thrown it down there, just before she met Harris. She also added that she wished she never had met Harris, and expressed an opinion that he was an impostor. That made Harris mad, and he produced his map, and explained his theory.

“The map may be all right enough,” said one of the party, “if you know whereabouts in it we are now.”

Harris didn’t know, and suggested that the best thing to do would be to go back to the entrance, and begin again. For the beginning again part of it there was not much enthusiasm; but with regard to the advisability of going back to the entrance there was complete unanimity, and so they turned, and trailed after Harris again, in the opposite direction. About ten minutes more passed, and then they found themselves in the centre.

Harris thought at first of pretending that that was what he had been aiming at; but the crowd looked dangerous, and he decided to treat it as an accident.

Anyhow, they had got something to start from then. They did know where they were, and the map was once more consulted, and the thing seemed simpler than ever, and off they started for the third time.

And three minutes later they were back in the centre again.

After that, they simply couldn’t get anywhere else. Whatever way they turned brought them back to the middle. It became so regular at length, that some of the people stopped there, and waited for the others to take a walk round, and come back to them. Harris drew out his map again, after a while, but the sight of it only infuriated the mob, and they told him to go and curl his hair with it. Harris said that he couldn’t help feeling that, to a certain extent, he had become unpopular."


FAVORITE PASSAGES

"Throw the lumber over, man! Let your boat of life be light, packed with only what you need—a homely home and simple pleasures, one or two friends, worth the name, someone to love and someone to love you, a cat, a dog, and a pipe or two, enough to eat and enough to wear, and a little more than enough to drink; for thirst is a dangerous thing."

"Everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses."

Editorial Reviews

Esquire Magazine
#2 of the 50 Funniest Books Ever Written
The Guardian
#33 of the Top 100 Novels of All Time

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013468603
Publisher:
Three Men In a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome
Publication date:
08/21/2011
Series:
Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome | Comedy Humor Classic Fiction | Three Men In a Boat Not to Mention the Dog , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
315,482
File size:
284 KB

Meet the Author

Jerome Klapka Jerome was an English writer and humorist, best known for the humorous travelogue Three Men in a Boat. Jerome was born in Caldmore, Walsall, England, and was brought up in poverty in London. He attended St Marylebone Grammar School

Other works include the essay collections Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow and Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow; Three Men on the Bummel, a sequel to Three Men in a Boat; and several other novels.

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