Three Perfect Peaches: A French Folktale

Three Perfect Peaches: A French Folktale

by Cynthia DeFelice, Irene Trivas, Mary DeMarsh
     
 

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"Abundant energy, breezy pacing and kid-pleasing 'gross-out' humor" (Publishers Weekly) will greatly appeal to children ages five to eight. In this spin on a time-honored plot, a king pro, mises his ailing daughter's hand in marriage to anyone who can grant her wish for three perfect peaches. Irene Trivas's frolicsome watercolors match the story's high jinks perfectly

Overview

"Abundant energy, breezy pacing and kid-pleasing 'gross-out' humor" (Publishers Weekly) will greatly appeal to children ages five to eight. In this spin on a time-honored plot, a king pro, mises his ailing daughter's hand in marriage to anyone who can grant her wish for three perfect peaches. Irene Trivas's frolicsome watercolors match the story's high jinks perfectly.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Abundant energy, breezy pacing and kid-pleasing ``gross-out'' humor mark this auspicious publishing debut of The Wild Washerwomen Storytellers (DeFelice is the author of Devil's Bridge, Weasel, etc.). And Trivas (Annie...Anya: A Month in Moscow) matches their high jinks perfectly-adding some of her own-with frolicsome, loosely rendered watercolors. In this appealing spin on a time-honored plot, a king promises his ailing daughter's hand in marriage to anyone who can grant her wish for three perfect peaches. The youngest of three brothers succeeds (an old woman turns his siblings' offerings into rabbit droppings and horse manure) and the princess is cured; the king hedges, however, demanding that the boy herd 100 rabbits into the palace. But the ingenious lad tricks the monarch into keeping his word and, in the process, into kissing a horse's behind. In addition to the pure fun of deflating the pompous, the story serves as a lighthearted reminder to be kind to all, no matter what their appearance. A fruitful merger of three peachy talents. Ages 5-8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Kathleen Karr
This is a charmingly tongue-in-cheek interpretation of an old French folktale. It has all the usual plot devices: the pining princess; the clever but poor younger son who hopes to gain her hand in marriage; the recalcitrant king. It also has a slightly irreverent tone that kids will love.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 3A sprightly adaptation of ``Three May Peaches,'' a French folktale. The youngest of three brothers cures a princess's illness with three perfect peaches and wins her hand in marriage through courtesy, craft, and the help of a magic whistle. The retellers base their version on the same source that Eric Kimmel used for Three Sacks of Truth (Holiday, 1993), but the books are distinctly different while remaining true to the essence of the source. Peaches is earthier than Kimmel's versionafter being rude to a mysterious old woman, the older brothers find their offerings of peaches transformed into rabbit droppings and horse manure; and when the king wants to buy the whistle, the clever hero makes the greedy man kiss his horse's behind as part of the bargain. These elements are in the original and are appropriate to the broad humor used throughout. The rhythm and pace of DeFelice and DeMarsh's narrative make it ideal for reading aloud, and it is embellished in a way that invites participation. Trivas's vibrant, fluid, cheery illustrations round out the text perfectlythey are done in glowing, jewel-like colors and are full of nifty humorous touches. (One minor quibble: the whistle is described as being silver, but it is depicted as golden). Buy this title even if your library already owns Three Sacks of Truth. Its warmth and exuberance will stay with readers and listeners for a long time.Donna L. Scanlon, Lancaster County Library, PA
Mary Harris Veeder
The authors, both involved in the oral tradition of storytelling, here retell a French folktale in a manner just right for story hour sharing. A freckled, redheaded princess is ill. Only three perfect May peaches will save her, and her father promises her hand to the one who can find them. As it turns out, the peaches are in the possession of a poor country family of three brothers. When the youngest, a kindly, clever country lad, brings them to court, however, the king tries to back out of his bargain. The lad eventually gets what he was promised, although not without some humorous goings-on. The text is delivered with a flourish, but the illustrations are not particularly distinctive--except when they picture the 100 rabbits the poor lad successfully herds with a magic whistle. The tale's pacing is strong; storytellers will certainly find it good enough to keep an audience's attention.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531087220
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/1995
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.42(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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