The Three Pigs

The Three Pigs

4.1 33
by David Wiesner
     
 

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This Caldecott Medal-winning picture book begins placidly (and familiarly) enough, with three pigs collecting materials and going off to build houses of straw, sticks, and bricks. But the wolf’s huffing and puffing blows the first pig right out of the story . . . and into the realm of pure imagination. The transition signals the start of a freewheeling

Overview


This Caldecott Medal-winning picture book begins placidly (and familiarly) enough, with three pigs collecting materials and going off to build houses of straw, sticks, and bricks. But the wolf’s huffing and puffing blows the first pig right out of the story . . . and into the realm of pure imagination. The transition signals the start of a freewheeling adventure with characteristic David Wiesner effects—cinematic flow, astonishing shifts of perspective, and sly humor, as well as episodes of flight.
Satisfying both as a story and as an exploration of the nature of story, The Three Pigs takes visual narrative to a new level. Dialogue balloons, text excerpts, and a wide variety of illustration styles guide the reader through a dazzling fantasy universe to the surprising and happy ending. Fans of Tuesday’s frogs and Sector 7’s clouds will be captivated by old friends—the Three Pigs of nursery fame and their companions—in a new guise.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Wiesner has created a funny, wildly imaginative tale that encourages readers to leap beyond the familiar; to think critically about conventional stories and illustration, and perhaps, to flex their imaginations and create wonderfully subversive versions of their own stories.
Booklist, ALA, Starred Review

"Children will delight in the changing perspectives...and the whole notion of the interrupted narrative...fresh and funny...Witty dialogue and physical comedy abound in this inspired retelling of a familiar favorite.
School Library Journal, Starred

As readers have come to expect from the inventive works of Wiesner, nothing is ever quite as it seems in his picture books. This version of the pigs' tale starts off traditionally enough —warm, inviting watercolor panels show in succession the tiny houses, their owner-builders and their toothy visitor. But when the wolf begins to huff and puff, he blows the pigs right out of the illustrations. Though Wiesner briefly touched on this theme in his Free Fall (fans may note a strong resemblence between the dragon in that volume and the one featured in these pages), he takes the idea of 3-D characters operating independently of their storybooks to a new level here. The three pigs land in the margins, which open out onto a postmodern landscape hung with reams of pages made for climbing on, crawling under and folding up for paper airplane travel. Together the pigs visit a book of nursery rhymes and save the aforementioned dragon from death at the hands of the knight. When they get the dragon home, he returns their kindness by scaring the wolf off permenantly.
Even the book's younger readers will understand the distinctive visual code. As the pigs enter the confines of a storybook page, they conform to that book's illustrative style, appearing as nursery-rhyme friezes or comic-book line drawings. When the pigs emerge from the storybook pages into the meta-landscape they appear photographically clear and crisp, with shadows and three dimensions. Wiesner's (Tuesday) brillant use of white space and perspective (as the pigs fly to the upper right-hand corner of a spread on their makeshift plane, or as one pig's snout dominates a full page) evokes a feeling that the characters can navigate endless possibilities —and that the range of story itself is limitless.
Publishers Weekly, Starred

With this inventive retelling, Caldecott Medalist Wiesner (Tuesday, 1991) plays with literary conventions in a manner not seen since Scieszka's The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales (1993). The story begins with a traditional approach in both language and illustrations, but when the wolf huffs and puffs, he not only blows down the pigs' wood and straw houses, but also blows the pigs right out of the story and into a parallel story structure. The three pigs (illustrated in their new world in a more three-dimensional style and with speech balloons) take off on a postmodern adventure via a paper airplane folded from the discarded pages of the traditional tale. They sail through several spreads of white space and crash-land in a surreal world of picture-book pages, where they befriend the cat from "Hey Diddle Diddle" and a charming dragon that needs to escape with his cherished golden rose from a pursuing prince. The pigs, car and dragon pick up the pages of the original story and return to that flat, conventional world, concluding with a satisfying bowl of dragon-breath-broiled soup in their safe, sturdy brick house. The pigs have braved the new world and returned with their treasure: the cat for company and fiddle music, the dragon's golden rose for beauty, and the dragon himself for warmth and protection from the wolf, who is glimpsed through the window, sitting powerlessly in the distance. On the last few pages, the final wqords of the text break apart, sending letters drifting down into the illustrations to show us that once we have ventured out into the wider worl, out stories never stay the same.
Kirkus Reviews with Pointers

David Wiesner's postmodern interpretation of this tale plays imaginatively with traditional picture book and story conventions and with readers' expectations of both. . . .Wiesner explores the possibilty of different realities within a book's pages. . . . Wiesner may not be the first to thumb his nose at picture-book design rules and storytelling techniques, but he puts his own distinct print on this ambitious endeavor. There are lots of teaching opportunities to be mined here—or you can just dig into the creative possibilities of unconventionality.
Horn Book

null Children's Books: 100 Titles NYPL

Artwork explodes off the page and the layout pushes bookmaking convention as the porcine siblings and their pals explore new literary territory.
SLJ Best Books of the Year

null Best Books for Children Cahners

bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
Never doubt the power of a pig. We suspect this was David Wiesner's mantra when creating this brilliantly innovative fractured fairy tale.

What begins as a the classic tale of "The Three Pigs" evolves into a free-for-all when the Big Bad Wolf's efforts to blow down the straw house of Pig No. 1 have unexpected consequences -- Pig is blown right of the story! He ends up on the pages of the book, falling out of the frame and transformed into a three-dimensional character. This leaves Wolf completely bewildered. As he approaches Pig No. 2 and his house of twigs, he tries again. But Pig's brother arrives just in time, with news that there is safety outside the confines of the storybook pages. The brothers exit, and Wolf is once again befuddled. When the pigs reach their other brother in the brick house, the three of them decide it's time to get away from Wolf for good. They pummel the storybook frames until they are completely flat -- and then they make an airplane! After a bit of soaring, they crash-land. Finally, they realize that they're being watched. Readers will squeal with delight as one of the pigs peers into the audience, his face filling the entire page. The Three Pigs then jump into the pages of other rhymes, meeting up with a very friendly dragon and a sweet cat. At this point, the entire crew join forces and decide to teach Wolf a lesson. They reconstruct the story frames, and when Wolf begins to blow a pig's house down, Dragon jumps in and gives him the scare of his life. The gang have created a home of their own and a new beginning. And as in any other fairy tale, they live happily ever after.

Wiesner uses a combination of watercolor, gouache, colored inks, and pencils to achieve his varied perspectives. This sophisticated style and humor will not escape young readers. His creative chaos is fresh and rejuvenating, adding wit and style to typical fairy-tale fare. Particularily stunning is Wiesner's use of white space, which evokes the many possibilities these clever pigs possess. We give Wiesner's awesome creation...two snouts up. (Amy Barkat)

New York Times Review of Books
Wiesner's dialogue and illustrations are clever, whimsical and sophisticated.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Even the book's younger readers will understand the distinctive visual code. As the pigs enter the confines of a storybook page, they conform to that book's illustrative style, appearing as nursery-rhyme friezes or comic-book line drawings. When the pigs emerge from the storybook pages into the meta-landscape, they appear photographically clear and crisp, with shadows and three dimensions. Wiesner's (Tuesday) brilliant use of white space and perspective (as the pigs fly to the upper right-hand corner of a spread on their makeshift plane, or as one pig's snout dominates a full page) evokes a feeling that the characters can navigate endless possibilitiesDand that the range of story itself is limitless. Ages 5-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Wiesner puts his considerable talents to work reworking the story of the three little pigs and the big bad wolf. Rather than allowing the wolf to eat the first little pig, he sends a three-dimensionally-drawn pig out of the boxed illustration that shows the wolf blowing down the pig's flimsy straw house. The next boxed illustration shows a perplexed wolf looking for his pig. The other pigs follow their brother outside the pages of the book, which we see strewn across a double-page spread, and begin to explore using a paper airplane folded from one of "their" book's pages. Crash-landing into a book of Mother Goose rhymes, the pigs escape into a story about a dragon and rescue the creature from the bemused-looking knight who has been sent to slay him. Back in their own story (and back to one dimension), the three pigs find that the dragon is an effective means of scaring off the big bad wolf. A clever tale that will keep kids poring over every detail. 2001, Clarion Books, . Ages 5 to 10. Reviewer: Cherri Jones
School Library Journal
K-Gr 6-In Tuesday (Clarion, 1991), Wiesner demonstrated that pigs could fly. Here, he shows what happens when they take control of their story. In an L. Leslie Brooke sort of style (the illustrations are created through a combination of watercolor, gouache, colored inks, and pencils), the wolf comes a-knocking on the straw house. When he puffs, the pig gets blown "right out of the story." (The double spread contains four panels on a white background; the first two follow the familiar story line, but the pig falls out of the third frame, so in the fourth, the wolf looks quite perplexed.) So it goes until the pigs bump the story panels aside, fold one with the wolf on it into a paper airplane, and take to the air. Children will delight in the changing perspectives, the effect of the wolf's folded-paper body, and the whole notion of the interrupted narrative. Wiesner's luxurious use of white space with the textured pigs zooming in and out of view is fresh and funny. They wander through other stories-their bodies changing to take on the new style of illustration as they enter the pages-emerging with a dragon and the cat with a fiddle. The cat draws their attention to a panel with a brick house, and they all sit down to soup, while one of the pigs reconstructs the text. Witty dialogue and physical comedy abound in this inspired retelling of a familiar favorite.-Wendy Lukehart, Dauphin County Library, Harrisburg, PA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618007011
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/01/2001
Series:
Edition 001 Series
Edition description:
Reinforced Binding
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
197,278
Product dimensions:
(w) x (h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Wiesner has created a funny, wildly imaginative tale that encourages readers to leap beyond the familiar; to think critically about conventional stories and illustration, and perhaps, to flex their imaginations and create wonderfully subversive versions of their own stories.
Booklist, ALA, Starred Review

"Children will delight in the changing perspectives...and the whole notion of the interrupted narrative...fresh and funny...Witty dialogue and physical comedy abound in this inspired retelling of a familiar favorite.
School Library Journal, Starred

As readers have come to expect from the inventive works of Wiesner, nothing is ever quite as it seems in his picture books. This version of the pigs' tale starts off traditionally enough—warm, inviting watercolor panels show in succession the tiny houses, their owner-builders and their toothy visitor. But when the wolf begins to huff and puff, he blows the pigs right out of the illustrations. Though Wiesner briefly touched on this theme in his Free Fall (fans may note a strong resemblence between the dragon in that volume and the one featured in these pages), he takes the idea of 3-D characters operating independently of their storybooks to a new level here. The three pigs land in the margins, which open out onto a postmodern landscape hung with reams of pages made for climbing on, crawling under and folding up for paper airplane travel. Together the pigs visit a book of nursery rhymes and save the aforementioned dragon from death at the hands of the knight. When they get the dragon home, he returns their kindness by scaring the wolf off permenantly.
Even the book's younger readers will understand the distinctive visual code. As the pigs enter the confines of a storybook page, they conform to that book's illustrative style, appearing as nursery-rhyme friezes or comic-book line drawings. When the pigs emerge from the storybook pages into the meta-landscape they appear photographically clear and crisp, with shadows and three dimensions. Wiesner's (Tuesday) brillant use of white space and perspective (as the pigs fly to the upper right-hand corner of a spread on their makeshift plane, or as one pig's snout dominates a full page) evokes a feeling that the characters can navigate endless possibilities—and that the range of story itself is limitless.
Publishers Weekly, Starred

With this inventive retelling, Caldecott Medalist Wiesner (Tuesday, 1991) plays with literary conventions in a manner not seen since Scieszka's The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales (1993). The story begins with a traditional approach in both language and illustrations, but when the wolf huffs and puffs, he not only blows down the pigs' wood and straw houses, but also blows the pigs right out of the story and into a parallel story structure. The three pigs (illustrated in their new world in a more three-dimensional style and with speech balloons) take off on a postmodern adventure via a paper airplane folded from the discarded pages of the traditional tale. They sail through several spreads of white space and crash-land in a surreal world of picture-book pages, where they befriend the cat from "Hey Diddle Diddle" and a charming dragon that needs to escape with his cherished golden rose from a pursuing prince. The pigs, car and dragon pick up the pages of the original story and return to that flat, conventional world, concluding with a satisfying bowl of dragon-breath-broiled soup in their safe, sturdy brick house. The pigs have braved the new world and returned with their treasure: the cat for company and fiddle music, the dragon's golden rose for beauty, and the dragon himself for warmth and protection from the wolf, who is glimpsed through the window, sitting powerlessly in the distance. On the last few pages, the final wqords of the text break apart, sending letters drifting down into the illustrations to show us that once we have ventured out into the wider worl, out stories never stay the same.
Kirkus Reviews with Pointers

David Wiesner's postmodern interpretation of this tale plays imaginatively with traditional picture book and story conventions and with readers' expectations of both. . . .Wiesner explores the possibilty of different realities within a book's pages. . . . Wiesner may not be the first to thumb his nose at picture-book design rules and storytelling techniques, but he puts his own distinct print on this ambitious endeavor. There are lots of teaching opportunities to be mined here—or you can just dig into the creative possibilities of unconventionality.
Horn Book

null Children's Books: 100 Titles NYPL

Artwork explodes off the page and the layout pushes bookmaking convention as the porcine siblings and their pals explore new literary territory.
SLJ Best Books of the Year

null Best Books for Children Cahners

Meet the Author


David Wiesner has won the Caldecott Medal three times—for Tuesday, The Three Pigs, and Flotsam—the second person in history to do so. He is also the recipient of two Caldecott Honors, for Free Fall and Mr. Wuffles. Internationally renowned for his visual storytelling, David has brought his artistry and his fascination with undersea life to a new genre, the graphic novel. He lives near Philadelphia with his family.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Outside Philadelphia, P.A.
Date of Birth:
February 5, 1956
Place of Birth:
Bridgewater, NJ
Education:
Rhode Island School of Design -- BFA in Illustration.
Website:
http://www.hmhbooks.com/wiesner/

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4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BM25 More than 1 year ago
The book The Three Pigs by David Wiesner is a wonderful book for students in the elementary levels. This book has received the Caldecott Award and falls under the Modern Fantasy genre. From the beginning the reader can tell that this might be a simple retelling of the classic story where the wolf huffs and puffs and thrown the poor little pigs houses to the ground. But on the contrary the reader is immediately engaged after a short twist where the pig is blown out of the story and begins talking to the reader then the same thing with the other pigs. From this point on the reader can tell that this is not the classic Three Pig version or a simple retell. The stories twist is very random, because once again they fall into other stories then they get out. The pigs explore a dragon story and drag along a few other characters. In the end they go back to their story along with the other characters and everything is fine, they have some soup and live happily ever after. This story is wonderful because it is so irregular and does not stick to the version most readers are used to.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Author and illustrator David Weisner puts an exquisite twist on the traditional version of "The Three Little Pigs" to make it his very own with "The Three Pigs". This children's fiction picture book allows the main characters, the three pigs, to leave its conventional story of the big bad wolf and building houses out of straw, sticks, and bricks and jump off the pages. The three pigs leave their own story and stumble into other stories where they meet a cat with a fiddle and a dragon that guards a golden rose. The pigs find the pages of their story again and jump back into action, but not without first bringing along a couple of friends.
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Sarah_Michelle More than 1 year ago
I have always been a fan of fairy tales and appreciate when they are retold. It can be difficult to keep it interesting though and I feel Wiesner does an amazing job at captivating the audience's interest from start to picture. While its a story people know, Wiesner manages to still keep it unqiue and different. I love the pictures (Wiesner won the Caldecott for this book) and it keep me smiling throughout the entire time I read it. The Three Pigs is a great story to be enjoyed by all!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is of course about the three little pigs and the big bad wolf, with a little twist to the story. Instead of the wolf eating the first little pig, the pig jumps to the side of the page as the wolf blows his house down. This also happens with the second pig, when the two pigs get to their brothers house they decide to loose the wolf for good. They jump to the edge and become flat they then build a paper airplane. While they are building the airplane and flying around they feel like they are being watched. Read the book to find out who is watching them and what the pigs do. Wisener, David. The Three Little Pigs. New York: Clarion Books, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Three Pigs I found this book to be delightful. The colors and illustrations were brilliant. David Wiesner, a two time Caldecott winner, has taken a classic story and made it new and exciting. As the wolf goes from house to house the pigs leave the storybook pages in order to be safe. By doing this it incorporates other stories and literary works. They come across the cat with his fiddle, and meet a dragon. It was also interesting how the pigs were drawn differently when they left the story book pages. When outside the storybook the pigs were drawn with much more detail. They looked more realistic. Instead of being one solid color they had highlights and shadowing. You could see the hair on their bodies as if they were real pigs and not storybook characters. This is not the only award that David Wiesner has received. He also won the 1992 Caldecott reward for his book Tuesday. He now lives in Philadelphia with his wife and two children. Wiesner, David. The Three Pigs. New York. Clarion Books, 2001. Reading level: 2.3
Guest More than 1 year ago
Caldecott Book Title: The Three Pigs Reading Level: Third Grade 3.6 Genre: Fairy Tale About the Author: David Wiesner was born on February 5, 1956, in Bridgewater, New Jersey. As a child, Wiesner re-created his world with his imagination. His imagination led him to develop an interest in the history of art. Mr. Wiesner studied many Renaissance and surrealist artist, and was inspired by these artists. In his spare time, he would sit and construct wordless comic books. After graduating from Rhonde Island School of Design, Wiesner was able to commit himself to the study of art and explore his passion for wordless storytelling. There he learned the fundamentals of drawing and painting. Since graduating from art school, Mr. Weisner has published more than ten award-winning children¿s books. Two of his books are Caldacott Honor books. He received the 1992 Caldecott Medal for Tuesday and the 2002 Caldecott Medal for The Three Pigs. Book Review: The Three Pigs is a wonderful new twist on the children¿s nursery rhyme The Three Pigs. The story begins the same as the nursery rhyme, but takes a delightful turn. When the wolf approaches the first house and blows it in, he blows the pig right out of the story frame. One by one, the pigs exit the fairy tale¿s border and set off on an adventure of their own. Folding a page of their own story into a paper airplane, the pigs fly off to visit other story books, rescuing dragons and luring the cat and the fiddle out of their nursery rhyme. I would recommend The Three Pigs to children for fun reading enjoyment. Bibliographic Information: Wiesner, David. The Three Pigs. New York: Clarion Books, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story of the Three Pigs has been passed down over the years. It's even been retold into what the wolf's side of the story was. A story of trickery, will the big bad wolf succeed in tricking all 3 little pigs? I have enjoyed the story when I was younger and still do. I am sure children to come will cherish it just as much. Weisner, David. The Three Pigs. NY: Clarion. 2001.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As soon as you dive in to David Wiesner's Three Little Pigs you realize that this is no ordinary version of the story. Right off the bat the first little pig sees that he is much safer outside of the story, and that is just what he does! He actually climbs right out of his story and begins a new adventure, all while climbing in and out of some of our favorite stories. Eventually he says, 'You know what? Let's go home.' But what happens then, you will have to read it to find out. David Wiesner began this funny little book after he wrote them into the ending of his other book, 'Tuesday'. He gives them a wonderful story all their own. Wiesner, David. 'The Three Little Pigs'.New York:Clarion Books, 2001. Reading Level:2.2
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Three Pigs begins as our traditional Three Little Pigs story until around the sixth page. At this point the wolf huffs and puffs and apparently blows the book apart. This allows the pigs to escape and venture in to what must be Mother Goose land. After that they end up in a castle with a dragon. One of the pigs decide to try to put the pages back in some type of organized fashion. But the words seem to literally be falling from the page. At the end we find the pigs, dragon, and cat with a fiddle having dinner together with the words, 'And they all lived happily ever aft' I enjoyed this book mainly because my seven year old enjoyed it. I could see through the eyes of a child that they enjoy surprises and something from the ordinary. He especially liked it when I would attempt to read those pages where the letters were falling off the page. I would recommend this 2002 Caldecott Medal winner to anyone with children but especially to those in grades K-2.
Guest More than 1 year ago
David Wiesner was awarded the Caldecott Award for The Three Pigs in 2002. David was born February 5, 1956, in New Jersey. When he was a little boy, he was constantly using his imagination to recreate his own world. The imaginative quality that is found in his work is attributed to his dreamlike and creativeness of his room. His wall paper contained of books, elephant heads, ships on bottles, rockets, and clocks. These were the last images he saw before going to sleep at night. You can see this in his book, Hurricane, found on page thirteen. This page shows the wallpaper from his youth. All of his books are illustrated very well and they allow the children to use their imagination to tell the story. In the story, The Three Pigs, it starts retelling the story of The Three Little Pigs with comic bubbles. Then the story starts to unravel and the storyline begins to do weird things. What happens as the pigs begin to explore? Where do they go and what do they see? Read the book to find the fun ending. I like how the book unravels the storyline and does other things. It makes the book that more interesting and fun. It is not like any other book and that is what makes the book so fun to read. The reading level is second grade, third month. As the book says ¿And they all lived happily ever aft¿¿ Wiesner, David. The Three Pigs. New York: Clarion Books, 2001.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story of the three pigs as we knew previously has changed. In Wiesner¿s version the story starts out the same but quickly changes. When the wolf blows down the first two pig¿s homes-the wolf also blows the two pigs out of the story. The first two pigs are enjoying the new surroundings and invite the third pig to join them. The three pigs go to other children¿s stories such as The Cat and the Fiddle and the pigs ask the cat to join them on their journal outside a book. The cat accepts the offer and the four characters then go to another story and ask a dragon to join them. After the dragon and the four other characters have fun outside of the stories they are normally in they decide to go back into the story of the pigs. They join the story once more and the five characters (three pigs, cat and the dragon) enjoy soup inside the third pig¿s brick house. The reading level for this book is between first through third grades. Wiesner, David. The Three Pigs. New York: Clarion Books, 2001.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Shawna Wyatt Book Review The Three Little Pigs Authored By: David Wiesner This is a delightful new spin on a old tale. In this book the three little pigs escape the pages of their book just as they about to get eaten by the big bad wolf. The pigs fly into other stories on a paper air plane the illustration in this book are great. This would be a great read a loud book to get children¿s creative juices flowing. David Wiesner grew up in suburban New Jersey. David Wiesner studied at Rhode Island School of Design.
Guest More than 1 year ago
David Wiesner was born and raised in Bridgewater, New Jersey, and graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. His work has appeared in several children's books including The Loathsome Dragon , which he retold in collaboration with his wife, Kim Khang. Freefall, his first book of his own authorship, was awarded a 1989 Caldecott Honor Medal. His most recent book is Hurricane, of which School Library Journal said, in a starred review, 'The fantasy spreads are detailed delights....We wouldn't wish a real hurricane on children, but this book will give them a taste of the magic of the moment when the lights go out.' This is a story with a twist. It begins normally telling the usual story of the three pigs. However, when the wolf gets to the brick house all of the pigs have gone from the story. They end up in the ¿Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle the cow jumped over the moon¿ story. Then they go to visit other stories and end up making friends with a big dragon. Then they return back to the three pigs story with fellow friend the dragon and other friends from the other story. The dragon gives the wolf a run for his money. Then at the end the cat from hey diddle, diddle says, ¿I think we are gonna like it here.¿
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story has a neat spin on the classic story of the three little pigs. The illustrations are very realistic. The arrangement of the photo makes it seem like the characters are going to fly out of the book. And that is exactly what happens in the story. The three pigs are tired of staying in this story so they leave and visit other characters from other stories. They tell them, ¿Come with us ¿hurry!¿ Children will love going on this adventure with them. This will encourage children to experiment with new ways of doing things. Variety is the spice of life. David Wiesner is also the author and illustrator of Tuesday, a Caldecott Medal Winner. He also wrote and illustrated Free Fall and Sector 7, both Caldecott Honor winners.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story begins the same as the nursery rhyme however takes a delightful turn. When the wolf approaches the first house and blows it in, he somehow manages to blow the pig right out of the story frame. As the text continues--'...and ate the pig up'-- the baffled look on the wolf's face as he looks in vain for his ham dinner is priceless. One by one, the pigs exit the fairy tale's border and set off on an adventure of their own. Folding a page of their own story into a paper airplane, the pigs fly off to visit other storybooks, rescuing dragons and luring the cat and the fiddle out of their nursery rhyme.