The Three Silly Girls Grubb

The Three Silly Girls Grubb

by Ann Hassett, John Hassett
     
 

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Skippity-skip-skip. One after the other, three silly sisters skip over a bridge on their way to school. But before she can cross to safety, each sister must face Ugly-Boy Bobby, a bully who hides in a hole beneath the bridge. Ugly-Boy Bobby was "the kind of boy who ate bugs, tossed stones at cats, and drank from puddles—the muddier the better." But even a boy… See more details below

Overview

Skippity-skip-skip. One after the other, three silly sisters skip over a bridge on their way to school. But before she can cross to safety, each sister must face Ugly-Boy Bobby, a bully who hides in a hole beneath the bridge. Ugly-Boy Bobby was "the kind of boy who ate bugs, tossed stones at cats, and drank from puddles—the muddier the better." But even a boy like Bobby hungers for something other than bugs and mud puddles from time to time. What he craves the most are jelly donuts, the very ones each sister carries in her lunch! Just when it seems that Ugly-Boy Bobby will stop at nothing to get those donuts, the biggest sister turns the tables on him with just one simple, little request . . .
Zany illustrations, full of fun details to discover, enliven this humorous take on the classic children's story, "The Three Billy Goats Gruff."

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Who needs billy goats and a troll? The Hassetts (Cat Up a Tree) do just fine without those traditional characters as they infuse the popular folktale with some fresh faces and a zippy sense of fun. When the three silly Grubb sisters sized "small, medium and extra large" miss the bus, they're forced to walk, well, "skippity-skip-skip" to school. Their path to higher learning takes the girls over a bridge under which truant, cranky Ugly-Boy Bobby lurks ("Who's that skipping on my bridge?" he says; the sisters' reply corresponds to their size, " `It is little me,' squeaked the smallest of the three"). Ugly-Boy Bobby tries to grab each Grubb girl's lunch, without luck, until the biggest Grubb makes him a truly lip-smacking offer that will change him forever. The clever collaborators behind this effort clearly express a childlike glee in their eclectic imagery (jelly donuts, a jump rope, a playful pup on each spread) and quick-paced text. Staying true to the genre, the girls' polite tone and resourceful actions win out. And all along, Ugly-Boy Bobby's benign threats and the skewed perspectives from under and atop the bridge keep the humor here afloat. Creamy-hued scenes of a grassy countryside evoke the story's timeless appeal while bright contemporary details (the school bus, backpacks, a lined roadway) offer kids some contemporary points of reference. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-A clever, funny takeoff on the "Three Billy Goats Gruff." Three sisters who miss the bus to school must cross the bridge under which Ugly-Boy Bobby resides, eating bugs and wallowing in the mud. As they cross, "skippity-skip-skip," he demands their jelly donuts, but the first silly girl only has one, the second, just six. It is the third sister who has the most, of course, and the fun is in the solution. There's no violence here; the extra-large girl puckers up her extra-large-sized lips and says, "You may have my dozen jelly-donuts- But first I will plant a dozen mushy kisses on your little-boy nose." That gets him running, all the way to school, and he hasn't missed a day since. The book ends, "Spink! Spank! Spinach! This story is finished." The weird and rollicking illustrations add dimension to the text. Colors are muted, becoming more so as rain falls and the conflict builds amid the flat olive green of the hills and trees; there's playful invention, too, and the spreads have a sense of movement and energy. The characters are squat, almost clownlike, with round faces, beady eyes, and painted-on lips; poor Bobby is truly ugly. This title is grounded in tradition but makes a strong statement all its own.-Martha Topol, Traverse Area District Library, Traverse City, MI Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Those three Billy goats have been transformed into young girls and the troll morphed into a mean boy in this retelling of the classic folktale. When the three Grubb sisters, sized small, medium, and extra large, miss the bus one day, they must walk to school . . . over a bridge where Ugly-Boy Bobby hides out every day. He never goes to school or ties his shoes, he eats bugs and worms, and he often throws things. As each skipping Grubb passes over, he demands to know who is crossing. They sweetly answer, also telling him what they will learn in school that day-to count to ten on their toes, to spell "bumblebee's bottom," and to look at tiny things under a microscope. Bobby threatens to eat the girls' lunches, but the small and medium-sized Grubbs each tell him to wait for the next bigger sister-she has more jelly donuts with her. Now, the extra large offers quite nicely to share, but the condition she sets is not acceptable to Ugly-Boy Bobby, who runs off to school and never misses a day again. The Hassetts (Cat Up a Tree, 1998, etc.) have created a gentler tale with this retelling-no one is threatened with being eaten, the girls and the "troll" are both people with whom children can identify, and the meanie gets rehabilitated. Soft colors, animals, and plants abound in the cartoon illustrations and the round faces of the characters are especially good for expressing emotions. Snip, snap, snout, a good turnabout. (Picture book. 4-8)
From the Publisher

"The Hassetts' playful bandying about of stereotypes gives the story its charm." Horn Book

"The Hassetts have created a gentler tale with this retelling...Soft colors, animals, and plants abound in the carton illustrations and the round faces of the characters are especially good for expressing emotions. Snip, snap, snout, a good turnabout." Kirkus Reviews

"The Hassetts' playful bandying about of stereotypes gives the story its charm." Horn Book

"The clever collaborators behind this effort clearly express a childlike glee in their eclectic imagery and quick-paced text." Publishers Weekly

A clever, funny takeoff on the "Three Billy Goats Gruff…"This title is grounded in tradition but makes a strong statement all its own.
School Library Journal, Starred

“Bouncily silly language lends itself to reading or telling aloud, but to miss the equally bouncy and silly illustrations would be a crime.” The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

“…the storytelling is lively, highlighted by growling threats and clever tricks, and the comical double-page spreads match the nonsense.” Booklist, ALA

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547562292
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/24/2006
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
Lexile:
AD520L (what's this?)
File size:
27 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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