Three Stations (Arkady Renko Series #7)

( 179 )

Overview

"[Smith] takes what in essence is a police procedural and elevates it to the level of absorbing fiction."---Nicholas A. Basbanes, Los Angeles Times" "Martin Cruz Smith Knows his Russia. Every page reeks of Moscow: dirty snow, the stink of cigarette and vodka fumes, the cynicism and tasteless opulence of the mafia, the all-pervasive corruption."---The Economist" "The sustained success of Smith's Renko books is based on much more than Renko. This author's gift for tart, succinct description creates a poisonous political backdrop, one that makes his ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (180) from $1.99   
  • New (20) from $1.99   
  • Used (160) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 20 (2 pages)
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(799)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
*~*~ Brand New, Mint Condition. Never Previously Owned.*~*~ Ships Immediately *~*~ Hassle-Free Refunds If you Aren't Fully Satisfied ~*~*

Ships from: Deer Park, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(799)

Condition: New
*~*~ Brand New, Mint Condition. Never Previously Owned.*~*~ Ships Immediately *~*~ Hassle-Free Refunds If you Aren't Fully Satisfied ~*~*

Ships from: Deer Park, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(91)

Condition: New
New York, NY 2010 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. BRAND NEW BOOK. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 256 p. Arkady Renko Novels (Hardcover). Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: St Petersburg, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(91)

Condition: New
New York, NY 2010 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. BRAND NEW BOOK. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 256 p. Arkady Renko Novels (Hardcover). Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: St Petersburg, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(2485)

Condition: New
2010-08-17 Hardcover New 0743276744 Ships Within 24 Hours. Tracking Number available for all USA orders. Excellent Customer Service. Upto 15 Days 100% Money Back Gurantee. Try ... Our Fast! ! ! ! Shipping With Tracking Number. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Bensalem, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(454)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 0743276744! ! KNOWLEDGE IS POWER! ! ENJOY OUR BEST PRICES! ! ! Ships Fast. All standard orders delivered within 5 to 12 business days.

Ships from: Southampton, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(739)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 0743276744! ! ! ! BEST PRICES WITH A SERVICE YOU CAN RELY! ! !

Ships from: Philadelphia, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(987)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 0743276744 Friendly Return Policy. A+++ Customer Service!

Ships from: Philadelphia, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(797)

Condition: New
Hardcover New 0743276744 SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS WITH BEST PRICES. FROM A COMPANY YOU TRUST, HUGE SELECTION. RELIABLE CUSTOMER SERVICE! ! HASSLE FREE RETURN POLICY, SATISFACTION ... GURANTEED**** Read more Show Less

Ships from: Philadelphia, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$2.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(4380)

Condition: New
New Book and Cover in Excellent Condition

Ships from: Cleveland, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 20 (2 pages)
Close
Sort by

Overview

"[Smith] takes what in essence is a police procedural and elevates it to the level of absorbing fiction."---Nicholas A. Basbanes, Los Angeles Times" "Martin Cruz Smith Knows his Russia. Every page reeks of Moscow: dirty snow, the stink of cigarette and vodka fumes, the cynicism and tasteless opulence of the mafia, the all-pervasive corruption."---The Economist" "The sustained success of Smith's Renko books is based on much more than Renko. This author's gift for tart, succinct description creates a poisonous political backdrop, one that makes his characters' survival skills as important as any of their other attributes. [This is] one top-flight series, still sharply honed, none the worse for wear."---Janet Maslin, The New York Times" "There are few thriller practitioners indeed who can weld a story to a graceful chassis of literature and send it barreling away at top speed. Martin Cruz Smith is one of them."---Andrew Z. Galarneau, The Buffalo News" "As always, Smith elevates a police procedural story to a taste of Russia, a glass of vodka poured quivering to the brim."---Jennifer Kay, Associated Press" "A passenger train hurtling through the night. An unwed teenage mother headed to Moscow to seek a new life. A cruel-hearted soldier looking furtively, forcibly, for sex. An infant disappearing without a trace." "So begins Martin Cruz Smithás masterful Three Stations, a suspenseful, intricately constructed novel featuring Investigator Arkady Renko. For the last three decades, beginning with the trailblazing Gorky Park, Renko (and Smith) have captivated readers with detective tales set in Russia. Renko is the ironic, brilliantly observant cop who finds solutions to heinous crimes when other lawmen refuse to even acknowledge that crimes have occurred. He uses his biting humor and intuitive leaps to fight not only wrongdoers but the corrupt state apparatus as well" "In Three Stations, Renkoás skills are put to their most severe test. Though he has been technically suspended from the prosecutor's office for once again turning up unpleasant truths, he strives to solve a last case: the death of an elegant young woman whose body is found in a construction trailer on the perimeter of Moscow's main rail hub. It looks like a simple drug overdose to everyone---except to Renko, whose examination of the crime scene turns up some inexplicable clues, most notably an invitation to Russia's premier charity ball, the billionaires' Nijinksy Fair. Thus a sordid death becomes interwoven with the lifestyles of Moscow's rich and famous, many of whom are clinging to their cash in the face of Putin's crackdown on the very oligarchs who placed him in power" Renko uncovers a web of death, money, madness and a kidnapping that threatens the woman he is coming to love and the lives of children he is desperate to protect. In Three Stations, Smith produces a complex and haunting vision of an emergent Russia's secret underclass of street urchins, greedy thugs and a bureaucracy still paralyzed by power and fear.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
In twenty-nine years, there have only been seven Arkady Renko novels and every single one of them has justified readers' high level of anticipation. The latest of these Martin Cruz Smith fictions is Three Stations, set once again in the ominous dark corridors and shadowy places of modern-day Moscow. A worthy successor to Stalin's Ghost. (Hand-selling tip: Chief homicide investigator Arkady Renko is one of the most striking, memorable protagonists in crime fiction.)
Publishers Weekly
Smith's seventh Arkady Renko novel (after Stalin's Ghost) falls short of his usual high standard. The Russian police detective, now a senior investigator, is seriously considering quitting the force because his boss, state prosecutor Zurin, refuses to assign him any cases. Renko seizes the chance to buck Zurin by finding the truth behind the death of a prostitute found in a workers' trailer parked in Moscow's seedy Three Stations (aka Komsomol Square). While the young woman, who Renko guesses is 18 or 19, apparently took a fatal drug overdose, he believes she was murdered. A subplot centering on a mother whose infant is stolen on a train detracts from rather than enhances the main investigation. This disappointing entry does only a superficial job of bringing the reader inside today's Russia. Hopefully, Smith and Renko will return to form next time. (Aug.)
Library Journal
Arkady Renko's reward for his investigative prowess described in five previous novels (from Gorky Park to Stalin's Ghost) is pathetic—he's about to be cashiered from his job as a cop in Moscow. He and his alcoholic detective buddy Viktor find a lovely young woman dead in a filthy trailer in Three Stations, a crime-ridden transportation center. The fate of one prostitute, however young or beautiful, is a trivial matter to their boss, so the investigation is squelched. Renko forges on stubbornly and develops clues that point to a serial killer on the loose. At the same time, Zhenya, Renko's solitary protégée, is embroiled in the kidnapping of another prostitute's infant. At Three Stations these two grim story arcs converge, and Renko's bravery, tenacity, and sheer intelligence are burnished to a warm glow in this compact yet deeply textured and finely written descent into Moscow's lower depths. VERDICT Fans everywhere will be eager to get the latest installment in the Renko saga, a terrific oeuvre for readers in every public library. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 3/15/10.]—Barbara Conaty, Falls Church, VA
Olen Steinhauer
Like the luminaries of the genre, Smith is at heart a deeply moral writer, and beneath his wry, cynical tone you can feel his authorial anger twitching a safe distance away. Paired with what reads deceptively like a native's knowledge of Russia, it makes for a potent brew…long live Renko. I don't care how he lays waste to Moscow package tours, for without this despairing seeker of truth, what would that heightened Russia of our imagination be left with? Convenient truths, still-buried secrets and tales that end abruptly before they've gotten started. We'd all be the worse for it.
—The New York Times
From the Publisher
“The sustained success of Smith’s Renko books is based on much more than Renko. This author’s gift for tart, succinct description creates a poisonous political backdrop, one that makes his characters’ survival skills as important as any of their other attributes. . . [This is] one top-flight series, still sharply honed, none the worse for wear.”

Janet Maslin, New York Times

The Barnes & Noble Review

Almost thirty years ago, in his novel Gorky Park, Martin Cruz Smith introduced us to Arkady Renko, the Moscow homicide investigator who arrived on the page almost fully alienated -- from his past, from his profession, and from the Soviet system. In Polar Star, the man apart became the man adrift, working on the "slime line" of a Russian factory ship. Each Renko novel seemed to propel its hero further to the margins; the newest, Three Stations, finds the investigator shocked by his own irrelevance and advancing age. "Who was this graying stranger," Renko wonders, "who rose from his bed, usurped his clothes and occupied his chair at the prosecutor's office?"

Even a dwindling Renko is, of course, a brilliant cop. But in this slim, almost ephemeral novel that fitfully illuminates the new Russia of oligarchs, drugs, sex slavery, decadence, and degradation, he is also conscience and memory. It's a memory increasingly at odds with his native city. "This wasn't Arkady's Moscow anymore," we learn as Renko navigates an old bohemian neighborhood now frequented by "leggy women with Prada bags who circulated from Pilates class to tapas bar, from tapas bar to sushi, from raw fish to meditation."

Those are, of course, the lucky women. In Three Stations we get to know the unlucky ones: Maya, sold into child prostitution, and Vera, found murdered in a filthy trailer. Vera's murder forms the core of the plot as Renko, disobeying orders and facing dismissal, stubbornly follows a trail that leads him to the truth -- if not to justice. "You have no authority and no protection," Arkady's drunken colleague, Victor, tells him, "What are you looking for? Blood on the sidewalk and a round of applause?"

It is Maya, however, who constitutes the novel's heart. We meet her on the first page, on a train, a traditionally fraught venue for any Russian heroine. She has a baby and she is on the run. "Maya had been the youngest prostitute at the club…off the menu, for trusted members only," her only retreat the abandoned bus shelter across the road on whose defaced walls "…Maya could still make out the faint outline of a rocket ship lifting off the ground, aspiring to more."

Robbed on the train, a distraught Maya arrives in Moscow where she meets Zhenya, the vagrant teenager who is the closest thing that Renko has to an adopted son. Like countless other, more feral, youths, Zhenya is a denizen of Three Stations, the city terminus where railway lines and chaotic traffic, both motorized and human, converge. Here the novel chiefly dwells, among the lost children of Russia. One runaway, for example, recalls a childhood home that was "like a listing ship, filthy clothes and empty bottles rolled to one side, bills underfoot."

As Cruz Smith draws his parallel plot lines together neatly if a little hastily, he creates bold sketches of a previously grey world thrown into sudden, garish disorder. "We were the idiots who put this lizard in power," a billionaire oligarch complains of Vladimir Putin, who is seen as betraying his paymasters. In a Russia that now spawns killers with "eyes deep as drains," even political corruption is not what it used to be.

--Anna Mundow

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743276740
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 8/17/2010
  • Series: Arkady Renko Series , #7
  • Pages: 243
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Martin Cruz Smith’s novels include Stalin’s Ghost, Gorky Park, Rose, December 6, Polar Star, and Stallion Gate. A two-time winner of the Hammett Prize from the International Association of Crime Writers and a recipient of Britain’s Golden Dagger Award, he lives in California.

Biography

"You have to be an outsider to write," the novelist Martin Cruz Smith has said, and the protagonists of Smith's novels also tend to be outsiders, viewing their surroundings with the wariness and sharpened attention of the displaced. Smith spent his early writing years churning out potboilers, but with the 1977 publication of Nightwing, a bestseller about a plague of vampire bats that descends on a Hopi Indian reservation, Smith finally earned enough money to embark on the book he really wanted to write: a detective novel set in Moscow.

The book opens on a grisly scene: three corpses are found frozen in Gorky Park, their faces and fingerprints obliterated. Homicide investigator Arkady Renko is put on the case, but his superiors seem less than eager to uncover the truth. Dense, atmospheric and intricately plotted, Gorky Park drew comparisons to the spy novels of John le Carré. It was hugely successful, and was made into a movie starring William Hurt in 1983. Smith wrote a historical novel about the first atom bomb, Stallion Gate, before returning to Renko’s checkered career as a detective in Polar Star and Red Square. Though he bears some resemblance to the disaffected detective of noir tradition, the cynical, depressive Renko also exemplifies the Soviet dissident -- an outsider in his own country.

Renko has been immensely popular with readers, some of whom were disappointed when Smith's 1996 novel Rose featured a new protagonist. But most Renko fans were won over by boozy, broke mining engineer Jonathan Blair, who arrives in an English coal-mining town on a mission to clear up the mysterious disappearance of the local curate. Time magazine called Rose "the most interesting and richly textured crime story of the season."

One thing that sets Smith's work apart from other thrillers is the breadth and depth of his research. Before writing Gorky Park, the author visited Moscow, befriended exiled Russians and read scores of Russian newspapers and magazines in translation. For Rose, he spent weeks in Lancashire talking with miners and visiting mines. Smith's recent works Havana Bay, in which Renko goes to Cuba, and December 6, set in Tokyo just before the bombing of Pearl Harbor, are equally fortified with research.

Though he's best known for Gorky Park, now considered a classic in the spy thriller genre, Smith is clearly a writer with more than one trick up his sleeve. "I never thought I would just be doing Arkady books," he once told a Salon interviewer. "I never intended to do any after Gorky Park, so I was pretty amazed when people asked me a few years ago what I was going to do now that the Cold War was over, as if I had been manufacturing missiles. I hate to be categorized. The great thing about being a writer is that you are always recreating yourself."

Good To Know

Martin Cruz Smith was born Martin William Smith, but changed his middle name to his grandmother's surname, Cruz. Smith is the son of a white jazz musician and a Pueblo Indian jazz singer.

George Orwell's The Road to Wigan Pier was one inspiration for Smith's novel Rose, set in the English coal-mining town of Wigan; another was a magazine article about the "pit girls" who flouted Victorian convention by wearing pants for their dangerous jobs above the mines.

Havana Bay, which reached No. 17 on the bestseller list, apparently didn't sell quite well enough to keep both author and publishers happy; a Random House publicity director told Salon that "[Havana Bay] didn't do as well as we'd hoped." After it came out, Smith left Random House for Simon & Schuster, which was looking to add more authors who could draw a male audience.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Martin William Smith (birth name); Simon Quinn; Jake Logan
    2. Hometown:
      San Rafael, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 3, 1942
    2. Place of Birth:
      Reading, Pennsylvania
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1964
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

1

The summer night swam by. Villages, ripening fields, derelict churches flowed and mixed with Maya’s dreams.

She tried to stay awake but sometimes her eyelids had their way. Sometimes the girl dreamt of the train’s first-class passengers tucked away asleep in their compartments.

Hard class had no compartments. “Hard class” was a dormitory coach where a few lamps were still lit and snoring, muffled sex, body odor and domestic quarrels were shared by all. Some passengers had been on the train for days and the fatigue of close quarters had set in. A round-the-clock card game among oil riggers soured and turned to resentment and accusations. A Gypsy went from berth to berth hawking the same shawls in a whisper. University students traveling on the cheap were deep in the realm of their headphones. A priest brushed cake crumbs from his beard. Most of the passengers were as nondescript as boiled cabbage. An inebriated soldier wandered up and down the corridor.

Still Maya preferred the rough sociability of hard class to traveling first class. Here she fit in. She was fifteen years old, a stick figure in torn jeans and a bomber jacket the texture of cardboard, her hair dyed a fiery red. One canvas bag held her earthly possessions, the other hid her baby girl of three weeks, tightly swaddled and lulled by the rocking of the train. The last thing Maya needed was to be trapped in a compartment under the scrutiny of snobs. Not that she could have afforded first class anyway.

After all, a train was just a communal apartment on rails, Maya decided. She was used to that. Most of the men stripped to warm-up pants, undershirts and slippers for the duration; she watched for any who had not because a shirt with long sleeves might conceal the tattoos of someone sent to bring her back. Playing it safe, she had chosen an otherwise empty berth. She talked to none of the other passengers and none noticed that the baby was on board.

Maya enjoyed creating stories about new people, but now her imagination was caught up with the baby, who was both a stranger and part of herself. The baby was, in fact, the most mysterious person she had ever met. All she knew was that her baby was perfect, translucent, unflawed.

The baby stirred and Maya went to the vestibule at the end of the car. There, half open to the wind and clatter of the train, she nursed the baby and indulged in a cigarette. Maya had been drug-free for seven months.

A full moon kept pace. From the tracks spread a sea of wheat, water tanks, a silhouette of a shipwrecked harvester. Six more hours to Moscow. The baby’s eyes regarded her solemnly. Returning the gaze, Maya was so hypnotized that she did not hear the soldier join her in the vestibule until the sliding door closed behind him and he said smoking was bad for the baby. His voice was a jolt, a connection with reality.

He removed the cigarette from her mouth and snapped it out the vestibule window.

Maya took the baby from her breast and covered herself.

The soldier asked if the baby was in the way. He thought it was. So he told Maya to put the baby down. She held on, although he slid his hand inside her jacket and squeezed her breast hard enough to draw milk. His voice cracked when he told her what else he wanted her to do. But first she had to put the baby down. If she didn’t, he would throw the baby off the train.

It took a second for Maya to process his words. If she screamed, could anyone hear her? If she fought, would he toss the baby like an unwanted package? She saw it covered with leaves, never to be found. All she knew was that it was her fault. Who was she to have such a beautiful baby?

Before she could put the baby down, the vestibule door opened. A large figure in gray stepped out, gathered the soldier’s hair with the grip of a butcher and laid a knife across his neck. It was the babushka who had been suffering the crumbs of the priest. The old woman told the soldier she would geld him next time they met and gave him a vigorous kick as a demonstration of sincerity. He could not get to the next car fast enough.

When Maya and the baby returned to their berth, the babushka brought tea from the samovar and watched over them. Her name was Helena Ivanova but she said that everyone up and down the line called her Auntie Lena.

Worn-out, Maya finally allowed herself to plunge into true sleep, down a dark slope that promised oblivion.

When Maya next opened her eyes sunlight flooded the coach. The train was at a platform and the dominant sound was flies circling in the warm air. The fullness in her breasts was urgent. Her wristwatch said 7:05. The train was expected to arrive at six-thirty. There was no sign of Auntie Lena. Both baskets were gone.

Maya rose and walked unsteadily down the corridor. All the other passengers—the boisterous oil riggers, the university boys, the Gypsy and the priest—were gone. Auntie Lena was gone. Maya was the only person on the train.

Maya stepped onto the platform and fought her way through early-morning passengers boarding a train on the opposite side. People stared. A porter let his baggage cart coast into her shin. The ticket takers at the gate didn’t remember anyone resembling Auntie Lena and the baby. It was a preposterous question from a ridiculous-looking girl.

People in the platform area were making good-byes and hundreds circulated around kiosks and shops selling cigarettes, CDs and slices of pizza. A thousand more sat in the haze of a waiting room. Some were going to the wilds of Siberia, some all the way to the Pacific and some were just waiting.

But the baby was gone.

© 2010 Titanic Productions

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface David Crystal Crystal, David

I Developing techniques, training and traits

Methods, training, remuneration, social and personal characteristics 3

II Lone Workers

Bernardo Machiavelli 21

Ludovico Dolce 23

John Marbeck 25

Conrad Gessner 27

Joseph Justus Scaliger 29

John Florio 31

Henry Oldenburg 33

Samuel Pepys 35

John Dunton 37

Alexander Cruden 41

John Hill 45

Giuseppe Garampi 47

Samuel Ayscough 51

Eduard Buschmann 55

William Poole 57

Charlotte Yonge 59

Lewis Carroll 61

Samuel Palmer 65

Percy Fitzgerald 67

Henry B. Wheatley 71

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche 75

Frederick Howard Collins 77

Sir Edward Cook 79

Beatrice Webb 83

Nancie Baily 87

Norman Douglas 89

Mary Petherbridge 93

Stella Browne 99

Theodora Bosanquet 101

Gordon V. Carey 103

Gertrude Boyle 105

Gilfred Norman Knight 109

Esmond de Beer 113

Frederick A. Pottle 115

John Edwin Holmstrom 117

Margaret Anderson 121

Frances Partridge 125

Georgette Heyer 127

William S. Heckscher 131

Robert Latham 135

Barbara Pym 137

Gerald Fowler 141

Hans Wellisch 145

BevAnne Ross 151

Oliver Stallybrass 153

Douglas Matthews 157

John Vickers 161

Elizabeth Moys 165

Ken Bakewell 167

Cherry Lavell 171

Christine Shuttleworth 175

Norma Whitcombe 179

Drusilla Calvert 181

Oula Jones 185

Tom Norton 189

Michael Brackney 193

Linda Fetters 197

Geraldine Beare 201

Frances Lennie 205

Laura Gottlieb 209

Bella Hass Weinberg 213

Jan Ross 217

Laurence Errington 221

Nancy Mulvany 225

Michael Robertson 229

III Banding Together

The Index Society, 1877-90 233

Other early groups 237

Society of Indexers

The first ten years, 1957-67 241

Three affiliations: American SI, Australian SI, IAS Canada 250

1968-77 260

1978-82 270

1983-87 277

1988-91 282

1992-95 291

The end of print-only indexing 297

The Indexer, 1958-95 299

Editorials in The Indexer, 1958-95 303

Obituaries in The Indexer, 1958-95 305

Chronology of print-only indexing 307

References 311

Acknowledgements 317

Index 321

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 179 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(41)

4 Star

(27)

3 Star

(62)

2 Star

(32)

1 Star

(17)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 179 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Arkady Renko returns!!!

    Without a any hyperbole, I can honestly say I love Martin Cruz Smith. His writing style is so different than every other cookie cutter mystery writer out there. His characters all seem reasonable and distinct. I have never been anywhere remotely close to Russia but Smith makes it so easy to see. I feel like I've been there. Renko is classically sarcastic without even trying and a great hero without any reason to be. My only qualm with this novel is that the other Renko novels seemed to spend more time with the red herrings and here there were only a handful of possible killers. I still really enjoyed it!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 16, 2011

    save your money, read his earlier books instead

    I have anticipated each new book from Cruz-Smith until now. Unlike some of his other books, this one seems as if it was written purely to capitalize on the author's name. People wander in and out of the story and have no real relation to the plot. They are put there to add pages to the book which is already only about 200 pages long. Then at the end of the book, the author says "times up" and just wraps up the story. There is no evolving to the conclusion. He just writes a terse ending.

    Save your money and hope Martin Cruz Smith returns to serious writing. His earlier books were well worth reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 11, 2010

    Re-read Gorky Park instead

    It was basically a waste of money to buy this for my Nook. The beginning of the story sets the hook, but then it is as if the author lost interest. At about the same time, the reader does also. Characters wander in, are introduced, and then vanish. For the first time in a Renko novel, the plot seems forced as if the author forgot how to integrate the characters and plot.
    The book is essentially a ghost of Gorky Park, Polar Star, Red Square, and Havana Bay.
    Save your money and re-read the other novels in the series, which are much more complicated and engaging.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The First Review

    Well, the first review from someone who has actually read the book. Martin Cruz Smith takes us back to Moscow and the nitty gritty world of lost children- those both runaway and those stolen. It's a modest effort, never once really taking off and just about falling apart at the finish. We care somewhat for the children, but life has bad things in store, and Renko can only accompany us on the path through which these souls travel. It is a dark, bleak world, one in which the author makes no attempt to ease the way, other than to cut the story off at about page 243. Was that an act of mercy or did he have no more to say?

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 31, 2010

    Renko! What a guy!

    I don't have to read it to tell you how good it is, but as soon as it came out I bought it, and am reading it now. As usual, it grabbed me right off. If it's by Martin Cruz Smith and about Arkady Renko, it's got to be good. (Polar Star is still my favorite, with Hanava Bay next.) I put Smith's Renko books at the very top of the list.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2012

    Shining news request

    I need you to put out a missing cat request for SageWhiskee at ':3' result one. I also need to put out a clan request for ShadeClan at ':3' result one.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2012

    K-9 unit dog house

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 6, 2012

    Typically good Martin Cruz Smith

    Having read all of the Arkady Renko series, I was not dissappointed. Having an interest in Russian culture, Martin Cruz Smith gives insight to the way of life in a country we knew little about for so long. Can't wait for the next release.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 19, 2011

    Arkady returns

    Moscow has become more corrupted by the Russian Mafia and Renko becomes involved in yet another squalid crime through his complicated relationship with Zhenya AND the Prosecutor's Office. Read "Wolves eat Dogs" before this one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 179 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)