Thriving in E-Chaos: Discover the Secrets of 20 Companies That Have Conquered a Turbulent Marketplace

Overview

In the tumult of the technology-driven New Economy, many well-established companies struggle to remain competitive, while others succeed, and even flourish. What sets these successful companies apart? Thriving in E-Chaos reveals the secrets of traditional companies succeeding in the New Economy and profiles ten corporations poised to succeed for years to come. Business strategist and author James D. Underwood, DBA, describes the three core principles every company must possess in order to thrive: the ability to ...
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Overview

In the tumult of the technology-driven New Economy, many well-established companies struggle to remain competitive, while others succeed, and even flourish. What sets these successful companies apart? Thriving in E-Chaos reveals the secrets of traditional companies succeeding in the New Economy and profiles ten corporations poised to succeed for years to come. Business strategist and author James D. Underwood, DBA, describes the three core principles every company must possess in order to thrive: the ability to implement the right technology, the vision and drive from the right leaders, and the agility to change direction on a dime as the business environment changes. Through exclusive interviews with key executives, readers get to see the inside stories of these companies.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761531173
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/31/2001
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 5.92 (w) x 8.83 (h) x 1.13 (d)

Meet the Author

James D. Underwood is a business professor at Dallas Baptist University. He has more than 15 years' experience as a corporate strategist and is the founder of the Dallas Strategy Group, Inc., whose clients include IBM, Sprint PCS, and Nortel. His articles on business strategy have appeared in the Handbook of Business Strategy, among other journals and magazines. Prior to his teaching and consulting, Dr. Underwood served as CEO of a number of privately held companies and as a commercial bank lender. He can be reached at docj@airmail.net. He lives in Irving, Texas.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Ch. 1 Strategic Balance: General Electric 1
Ch. 2 The Ladder of Performance: Hewlett Packard 29
Ch. 3 Leaders for the New Millennium: Cisco Systems, Texas Instruments, Sprint PCS 63
Ch. 4 The Iconoclastic Organization: Toni & Guy, Microsoft, Wal-Mart 93
Ch. 5 The Four-Phase Cycle 115
Ch. 6 The Traditional Model, and Why It Doesn't Work 139
Ch. 7 Managing Change in a Supersonic Environment: Pizza Hut, EDS 167
Ch. 8 Product Management and Complex Environments: Southwest Airlines 197
Ch. 9 Continue to Learn or Cease to Exist 223
Ch. 10 Management and Dynamic Systems: Standard Aero of Canada 245
Ch. 11 The Process of Strategic Balance: Stratfor.com, Enron, The Lauck Group 267
Ch. 12 Winners and Losers in the New Digital World: Telecom Technologies (Sonus), Fidelity Investments, TMP Worldwide, The Promotion Network, Dell Computer 293
Endnotes 319
Index 327
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2001

    Strategic Balance Makes So Much Sense

    Corporate America is hopefully learning that doing things the way they've always done them isn't working anymore. Change happens fast,unpredictably and is more complex in nature due to globalization. This turbulence is why Jim Underwood's concept of aligning your company's capabilities with those that will be required based on the nature of the future environment is so powerful. By achieving this 'strategic balance' a firm can maximize its profit potential, while avoiding life threatening disasters. The toughest part of planning is not determining your current strengths and weaknesses internally or gauging what opportunities or threats may exist within the marketplace today, but trying desparately to determine what the marketplace is going to do over the next few years. What products should we develop and how should we innovate or divest ourselves of products we already have? By examining the central role of technology in business today within the context of the triad of leadership, agility and continuous learning, then comparing that to the perceived requirements of the future industry environment, Underwood's model guides management in pinpointing the gaps that need closing to bring the firm up to full speed for the days to come. This book makes real sense and provides solid tools for achieving and maintaining profitability, while placing other management tools available today in proper perspective for better utilization. This is a very positive step forward for strategic management and thinking.

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