Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There

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Overview

When Trough the Looking glass was published in 1871, readers were as delighted with that book as they were with Lewis Carroll's first masterpiece, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In the topsy-turvy world that lies beyond the looking-glass, Alice meets such fantastical characters as Tweedledum and Tweedledee, Humpty Dumpty, and the Jabberwock.

For over 120 years John Tenniel's superb illustrations have been the perfect complement to Lewis Carroll's timeless story. This is the ...

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Through the Looking-Glass: And What Alice Found There (Illustrated)

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Overview

When Trough the Looking glass was published in 1871, readers were as delighted with that book as they were with Lewis Carroll's first masterpiece, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In the topsy-turvy world that lies beyond the looking-glass, Alice meets such fantastical characters as Tweedledum and Tweedledee, Humpty Dumpty, and the Jabberwock.

For over 120 years John Tenniel's superb illustrations have been the perfect complement to Lewis Carroll's timeless story. This is the first edition of Looking-glass to reproduce Tenniel's exquisite drawings from engravings taken directly from the original woodblocks. Here, Tenniel's fine line work is far crisper, delicate shadings are reproduced with more subtlety, and details never seen before are now visible.

The pictures for the first edition of Looking-glass were created by transferring the artist's drawings to woodblocks. These original blocks served as masters from which metal plates were made for printing. Unfortunately, these plates deteriorated from the repeated pressure applied during the printing process, and over time, many of the fine lines in Tenniel's pictures simply vanished.

The original woodblocks disappeared and were believed lost; then, in 1985 they were discovered in a London bank vault. Now, for the first time, engravings from these woodblocks have been used to produce a deluxe gift edition. At last, readers can see the Looking-glass that Carroll and Tenniel had originally intended.

In this sequel to "Alice in Wonderland," Alice goes through the mirror to find a strange world where curious adventures await her.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Classics Illustrated comics returns with this dismal adaptation of Carroll's second Alice tale. Most of the charming paradoxes and silly puns are salvaged in gs the text, arranged in columns beneath the artwork rather than in word balloons. Consequently, a lot of very small illustrations are needed to carry the dialogue between Alice and the many looking-glass characters--to the detriment of the visual appeal of the work. g Baker ( Why I Hate Saturn ) is a good caricaturist, but the drawings often appear perfunctory and the color choicesg flat, garish and awkward. At its best (the Humpty Dumpty scenes), the g sketchy linework seems more appropriate to a realistic narrative, a thriller or a political satire, and the g book lacks throughout the careful design and rendering that a children's classic requires. (Feb.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780425120224
  • Publisher: First Classics, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/1990

Meet the Author

Lewis Carroll

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, published Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in 1865 and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, in 1871. Considered a master of the genre of literary nonsense, he is renowned for his ingenious wordplay and sense of logic, and his highly original vision.

Sir John Tenniel briefly attended the Royal Academy Schools, but for the most part he was a self taught artist. His illustrations appeared regularly in Punch, but it was the Alice books that confirmed his international reputation as an illustrator. Tenniel was knighted in 1893.

Biography

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, was a man of diverse interests -- in mathematics, logic, photgraphy, art, theater, religion, medicine, and science. He was happiest in the company of children for whom he created puzzles, clever games, and charming letters.

As all Carroll admirers know, his book Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), became an immediate success and has since been translated into more than eighty languages. The equally popular sequel Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, was published in 1872.

The Alice books are but one example of his wide ranging authorship. The Hunting of the Snark, a classic nonsense epic (1876) and Euclid and His Modern Rivals, a rare example of humorous work concerning mathematics, still entice and intrigue today's students. Sylvie and Bruno, published toward the end of his life contains startling ideas including an 1889 description of weightlessness.

The humor, sparkling wit and genius of this Victorian Englishman have lasted for more than a century. His books are among the most quoted works in the English language, and his influence (with that of his illustrator, Sir John Tenniel) can be seen everywhere, from the world of advertising to that of atomic physics.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Group (USA).

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    1. Also Known As:
      Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (real name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 27, 1832
    2. Place of Birth:
      Daresbury, Cheshire, England
    1. Date of Death:
      January 14, 1898
    2. Place of Death:
      Guildford, Surrey, England

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One



Looking-Glass House



One thing was certain, that the white kitten had had nothing to do with it : -- it was the black kitten's fault entirely. For the white kitten had been having its face washed by the old cat for the last quarter of an hour (and bearing it pretty well, considering) ; so you see that it couldn't have had any hand in the mischief.

The way Dinah washed her childrens faces was this : first she held the poor thing down by its ear with one paw, and then with the other paw she rubbed its face all over, the wrong way, beginning at the nose : and just now, as I said, she was hard at work on the white kitten, which was lying quite still and trying to purr -- no doubt feeling that it was all meant for its good.

But the black kitten had been finished with earlier in the afternoon, and so, while Alice was sitting curled up in a corner of the great armchair, half talking to herself and half asleep, the kitten had been having a grand game of romps with the ball of worsted Alice had been trying to wind up, and had been rolling it up and down fill it had all come undone again ; and there it was, spread over the hearth-rug, all knots and tangles, with the kitten running after its own tail in the middle.

"Oh, you wicked wicked little, thing!" cried Alice, catching tip the kitten, and giving it a little kiss to make it understand that it was in disgrace. "Really, Dinah ought to have taught you better manners ! You ought, Dinah, you know you ought! " she added, looking reproachfully at the old cat, and speaking in as cross a voice as she could manage -- and then she scrambled back into thearm-chair, taking the kitten and the worsted with her, and began winding up the ball again. But she didn't get on very fast, as she was talking all the time, sometimes to the kitten, and sometimes to herself. Kitty sat very demurely on her knee, pretending to watch the progress of the winding, and now and then putting out one paw and gently touching the ball, as if it would be glad to help if it might.

"Do you know what to-morrow is, Kitty? " Alice began. "You'd have guessed if you'd been up in the window with me -- only Dinah was making you tidy, so you couldn't. I was watching the boys getting in sticks for the bonfire -- and it wants plenty of sticks, Kitty ! Only it got so cold, and it snowed so, theyhad to leave off. Never mind, Kitty, we'll go and see the bonfire to-morrow." Here Alice wound two or three turns of the worsted round the kitten's neck, just to see how it would look : this led to a scramble, in which the ball rolled down upon the floor, and yards and yards of it got unwound again.

"Do you know, I was so angry, Kitty," Alice went on, as soon as they were comfortably settled again, "when I saw all the mischief you had been doing, I was very nearly opening the window, and putting you out into the snow ! And you'd have deserved it, you little mischievous darling! What have you got to say for yourself ? Now don't interrupt me! " she went on, holding up one finger. "I'm going to tell you all your faults. Number one: you squeaked twice while Dinah was washing your face this morning. Now you can't deny it, Kitty : I heard you ! What's that you say? " (pretending that the kitten was speaking.) "Her paw went into your eye ? Well, that's your fault, for keeping your eyes open -- if you'd shut them tight up, it wouldn't have happened. Now don't make any more excuses, but listen ! Number two : you pulled Snowdrop away by the tail just as I had put down the saucer of milk before her! What, you were thirsty, were you ? How do you know she wasn't thirsty too ? Now for number three: you unwound every bit of the worsted while I wasn't looking !

"That's three faults, Kitty, and you've not been punished for any of them yet. You know I'm saving up all your punishments for Wednesday week -- Suppose they had saved up all my punishments!" she went on, talking more to herself than the kitten. "What would they do at the end of a year ? I should be sent to prison, I suppose, when the day came. Or -- let me see-- suppose each punishment was to be going without a dinner : then, when the miserable day came, I should have to go without fifty dinners at once ! Well, I shouldn't mind that much! I'd far rather go without them than cat them !

"Do you hear the snow against the windowpanes, Kitty ? How nice and soft it sounds !

Just as if some one was kissing the window all over outside. I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently ? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt ; and perhaps it says, 'Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.' And when they wake up in the summer, Kitty, they dress themselves all in green, and dance about -- whenever the wind blows -- oh, that's very pretty!" cried Alice, dropping the ball of worsted to clap her hands. "And I do so wish it was true! I'm sure the woods look sleepy in the autumn, when the leaves are getting brown.

"Kitty, can you play chess ? Now, don't smile, my dear, I'm asking it seriously. Because, when we were playing just now, you watched just as if you understood it: and when I said 'Check!' you purred! Well, it was a nice check, Kitty, and really I might have won, if it hadn't been for that nasty Knight, that came wriggling down among my pieces. Kitty, dear, let's pretend --"

Through The Looking Glass. Copyright © by Lewis Carroll. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 33 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 17, 2011

    the original is great

    the major problems with this nook book are as follows... 1. most words are spelled wrong 2. there are random numbers and words in the middle of lines that don't belong there 3. there are so many of these mistakes it's almost impossible to read.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2013

    M

    So far i believe this book is very intriguing. I enjoyed learning the different parts of the life of a girl that i came to know and love as a young child. Btw im 14 and i have awesome grammar!!! (;-) ;) :)

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2013

    Lola

    It dose not shoe the cov.........


    But book self is good

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2013

    I am a idoit :(

    I did something stupid that i wasn't sopost to do i am so sad that i don't want to read :( :(

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2012

    Bad scans, broken images

    Not the worst I've seen here, as pages are somewhat readable, but it's definitely striving to be among the others in the bottom of the trash heap.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    :P

    Its free. See for your self.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2014

    Unreadable scan

    The text has apparently not been proofread or edited at all after scanning. It is full of scanning errors including misspelled words, unrelated symbols, extraneous spaces and empty lines, and blocks of text which are out of order.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2013

    Do the mostakes mess it up

    Is it worth reading????????

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2013

    Good

    This is a really good ook.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    Definiteley should be rated with three stars

    The story as charming as ever, but this book has quite a few errors as the dwscription said

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Through the looking glass

    Quite good for a free book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2012

    Tell me please

    Can someone say if it is a good book or not please?????????

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2012

    Hello!

    Can someone plz write a helpful REVEIW!!!!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Should get it?

    Hmmmmm can someone tell me if its a good book?

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted June 24, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2010

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    Posted December 11, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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