Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There

Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There

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by Carroll, Fiona Shaw, Fiona Shaw
     
 

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Carroll's classic stories reunited with Peake's celebrated illustrations, restored for the first time to their original glory.

In the 1940s, Gormenghast trilogy author Mervyn Peake was commissioned to produce a series of seventy pen-and-ink drawings to accompany Lewis Carroll's two classics, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through theSee more details below

Overview

Carroll's classic stories reunited with Peake's celebrated illustrations, restored for the first time to their original glory.

In the 1940s, Gormenghast trilogy author Mervyn Peake was commissioned to produce a series of seventy pen-and-ink drawings to accompany Lewis Carroll's two classics, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. Previously admired for his illustrations of Treasure Island and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Peake set to work, producing such luminous, eccentric images that Graham Greene would later refer to him as 'the first artist since Tenniel to recast Alice in a contemporary mould.'

In these editions, Peake's marvelous illustrations, many of them originally drawn on poor quality wartime paper, have been meticulously reproduced as they were meant to be seen. Thanks to a combination of old-fashioned craft and cutting-edge computer technology, the delightful images shine for the first time in over two decades alongside Carroll's fantastically eccentric text. With introductions by modern literary masters Will Self and Zadie Smith, these beautifully designed and printed books are the perfect gift for adults and children alike.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Classics Illustrated comics returns with this dismal adaptation of Carroll's second Alice tale. Most of the charming paradoxes and silly puns are salvaged in gs the text, arranged in columns beneath the artwork rather than in word balloons. Consequently, a lot of very small illustrations are needed to carry the dialogue between Alice and the many looking-glass characters--to the detriment of the visual appeal of the work. g Baker ( Why I Hate Saturn ) is a good caricaturist, but the drawings often appear perfunctory and the color choicesg flat, garish and awkward. At its best (the Humpty Dumpty scenes), the g sketchy linework seems more appropriate to a realistic narrative, a thriller or a political satire, and the g book lacks throughout the careful design and rendering that a children's classic requires. (Feb.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9789626341421
Publisher:
Naxos Audiobooks Ltd.
Publication date:
02/28/1998
Series:
Junior Classics Series
Edition description:
Abridged, 2 CDs, 2 hrs. 15 mins.
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 4.88(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Looking-Glass House

One thing was certain, that the white kitten had had nothing to do with it : -- it was the black kitten's fault entirely. For the white kitten had been having its face washed by the old cat for the last quarter of an hour (and bearing it pretty well, considering) ; so you see that it couldn't have had any hand in the mischief.

The way Dinah washed her childrens faces was this : first she held the poor thing down by its ear with one paw, and then with the other paw she rubbed its face all over, the wrong way, beginning at the nose : and just now, as I said, she was hard at work on the white kitten, which was lying quite still and trying to purr -- no doubt feeling that it was all meant for its good.

But the black kitten had been finished with earlier in the afternoon, and so, while Alice was sitting curled up in a corner of the great armchair, half talking to herself and half asleep, the kitten had been having a grand game of romps with the ball of worsted Alice had been trying to wind up, and had been rolling it up and down fill it had all come undone again ; and there it was, spread over the hearth-rug, all knots and tangles, with the kitten running after its own tail in the middle.

"Oh, you wicked wicked little, thing!" cried Alice, catching tip the kitten, and giving it a little kiss to make it understand that it was in disgrace. "Really, Dinah ought to have taught you better manners ! You ought, Dinah, you know you ought! " she added, looking reproachfully at the old cat, and speaking in as cross a voice as she could manage -- and then she scrambled back into thearm-chair, taking the kitten and the worsted with her, and began winding up the ball again. But she didn't get on very fast, as she was talking all the time, sometimes to the kitten, and sometimes to herself. Kitty sat very demurely on her knee, pretending to watch the progress of the winding, and now and then putting out one paw and gently touching the ball, as if it would be glad to help if it might.

"Do you know what to-morrow is, Kitty? " Alice began. "You'd have guessed if you'd been up in the window with me -- only Dinah was making you tidy, so you couldn't. I was watching the boys getting in sticks for the bonfire -- and it wants plenty of sticks, Kitty ! Only it got so cold, and it snowed so, theyhad to leave off. Never mind, Kitty, we'll go and see the bonfire to-morrow." Here Alice wound two or three turns of the worsted round the kitten's neck, just to see how it would look : this led to a scramble, in which the ball rolled down upon the floor, and yards and yards of it got unwound again.

"Do you know, I was so angry, Kitty," Alice went on, as soon as they were comfortably settled again, "when I saw all the mischief you had been doing, I was very nearly opening the window, and putting you out into the snow ! And you'd have deserved it, you little mischievous darling! What have you got to say for yourself ? Now don't interrupt me! " she went on, holding up one finger. "I'm going to tell you all your faults. Number one: you squeaked twice while Dinah was washing your face this morning. Now you can't deny it, Kitty : I heard you ! What's that you say? " (pretending that the kitten was speaking.) "Her paw went into your eye ? Well, that's your fault, for keeping your eyes open -- if you'd shut them tight up, it wouldn't have happened. Now don't make any more excuses, but listen ! Number two : you pulled Snowdrop away by the tail just as I had put down the saucer of milk before her! What, you were thirsty, were you ? How do you know she wasn't thirsty too ? Now for number three: you unwound every bit of the worsted while I wasn't looking !

"That's three faults, Kitty, and you've not been punished for any of them yet. You know I'm saving up all your punishments for Wednesday week -- Suppose they had saved up all my punishments!" she went on, talking more to herself than the kitten. "What would they do at the end of a year ? I should be sent to prison, I suppose, when the day came. Or -- let me see-- suppose each punishment was to be going without a dinner : then, when the miserable day came, I should have to go without fifty dinners at once ! Well, I shouldn't mind that much! I'd far rather go without them than cat them !

"Do you hear the snow against the windowpanes, Kitty ? How nice and soft it sounds !

Just as if some one was kissing the window all over outside. I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently ? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt ; and perhaps it says, 'Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes again.' And when they wake up in the summer, Kitty, they dress themselves all in green, and dance about -- whenever the wind blows -- oh, that's very pretty!" cried Alice, dropping the ball of worsted to clap her hands. "And I do so wish it was true! I'm sure the woods look sleepy in the autumn, when the leaves are getting brown.

"Kitty, can you play chess ? Now, don't smile, my dear, I'm asking it seriously. Because, when we were playing just now, you watched just as if you understood it: and when I said 'Check!' you purred! Well, it was a nice check, Kitty, and really I might have won, if it hadn't been for that nasty Knight, that came wriggling down among my pieces. Kitty, dear, let's pretend --"

Through The Looking Glass. Copyright � by Lewis Carroll. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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