Thunder on the Plains

Thunder on the Plains

4.6 23
by Rosanne Bittner

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With more than 7 million books in print, RT Book Reviews Career Achievement Award—winning and USA Today Bestselling author Rosanne Bittner pens a historical Western romance filled with dangerous cowboys, capable heroines, and an epic love story that sweeps across the Old West.


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With more than 7 million books in print, RT Book Reviews Career Achievement Award—winning and USA Today Bestselling author Rosanne Bittner pens a historical Western romance filled with dangerous cowboys, capable heroines, and an epic love story that sweeps across the Old West.

Sunny Landers wants a big life-as big and free as the untamed land that stretches before her. Land she will help her father conquer to achieve his dream of a transcontinental railroad. She won't let a cold, creaky wagon, murderous bandits or stampeding buffalo stand in her way. She wants it all-including Colt Travis.

Like the land of his birth, half—Cherokee Colt Travis is wild, hard, and dangerous. He is a drifter, a wilderness scout with no land and no prospects hired by the Landers family to guide their wagon train. He knows Sunny is out of his league and her father would never approve, but beneath the endless starlit sky, anything seems possible...

Praise for Bestselling Historical Western Romances by Rosanne Bittner:
"A hero to set feminine hearts aflutter...western romance readers will thoroughly enjoy this." -Library Journal
"Fans of such authors as Jodi Thomas and Georgina Gentry will enjoy Bittner's thrilling tale of crime and love in the Old West."-Booklist Online
"One of the most powerful voices in western romance."-RT Book Reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The author of In the Shadow of the Mountains packs this diverting western romance so full--with likable characters, realistic dialogue and details about frontier life--that she balances the predictable love-conquers-all plot. In 1857, 15-year-old Sunny Landers travels west with father Bo to plan routes for the transcontinental railroad that has long been Bo's dream. Colt Travis, 20 and half Cherokee, acts as their guide; his strength, good looks and love of the land are matched with Sunny's sweet disposition and beauty as a powerful but postponed romantic possibility. The opposition of Sunny's family and, later, her duties as head of the Landers empire (which contrast sharply with Colt's outdoor life and belief in honest business practices) intervene. Convenient plot devices--accidents, chance meetings, family secrets--conjoin to ensure seemingly insurmountable obstacles to the lovers' future together. Lengthy psychological musings, torrid sex scenes and inspired descriptions of the settings build toward the inevitable happy ending. (Jan.)
Library Journal
To fulfill his dream of building a railroad across America, Bo Landers hires young Colt Travis in 1857 to guide his party along a possible route. Landers's young, innocent, and beautiful daughter Sunny is immediately attracted to the tall, dark, and ruggedly handsome half-breed scout, and he to her. They deny their love for 12 years, knowing their worlds are too different for a relationship between them to succeed. Outside influences work against them, too: war, imprisonment, the deliberate intervention of her relatives, injuries, marriage to others. This is a well-written historical novel, and the macho but tender Colt is a hero to set feminine hearts aflutter. Other characters are also realistic in the action-packed story that only stretches credibility a little. Western romance readers will thoroughly enjoy this.-- Andrea Lee Shuey, Dallas P.L.
Publishers Weekly
Veteran western romance author Bittner (Outlaw Hearts) pairs a fabulously wealthy heiress with an adventurous plains scout on a tense and twisting epic journey that will leave readers cheering. In the mid-19th century, 15-year-old Sunny Landers is being molded by her tycoon father to take over his business, and that means joining him on a trip from Omaha to the Rockies to survey the possibility of building a transcontinental railroad. She finds an untamed country that’s easy to love—and meets handsome Colt Travis, the orphaned son of a Texan missionary and his Cherokee wife. Though Colt shares her attraction, they both understand that they are too different for a successful union. While Sunny works to carry out her father’s dream of a transcontinental railroad despite resistance from within her family and years of civil war, Colt must navigate his love of the land and his complex heritage as the world around him changes and duty conflicts with friendship. The carefully woven story stumbles only when the characters stop behaving sensibly in order to expand the plot. Agent: Maura Kye-Casella, Don Congdon Associates. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
"Veteran western romance author Bittner (Outlaw Hearts) pairs a fabulously wealthy heiress with an adventurous plains scout on a tense and twisting epic journey that will leave readers cheering." - Publishers Weekly

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Product Details

Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
Product dimensions:
4.24(w) x 6.86(h) x 1.32(d)

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Thunder on the Plains

By Rosanne Bittner

Sourcebooks, Inc.

Copyright © 1992 Rosanne Bittner
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4022-6766-6


May 1857

Annie Webster frowned when she opened the door. "I don't take nobody but gentlemen in my boardinghouse," she warned defensively, "and only them that bathes."

The young man standing on her porch removed a wide-brimmed leather hat, revealing a cascade of thick, nearly black hair that fell in tumbled layers. "I don't know much about gentlemen, ma'am, except that I'm no troublemaker; and I do take baths, often as I can."

The woman studied him closely, noticing he was clean-shaven. Although he wore buckskins, they were not worn and dirty like those she had seen on so many other men in Omaha who dressed like this one. The young man smiled warmly, his teeth straight and white, too white, she thought. Maybe they looked that way because his skin was so dark. Whatever the reason, it was a very handsome, unnerving smile, and it destroyed her remaining defenses.

She stepped aside, allowing him inside. His lanky six-foot-plus frame towered over her as she closed the door and folded her arms, a look of authority moving into her eyes. "Well, what will it be? Money's got to be paid up front. I've had my share of men comin' in here and messin' up a room for a couple of nights, then takin' off without payin'."

"I'm not here for a room, ma'am. Name's Colt Travis, and I came here to see a Mister uh —" He stopped and took a folded piece of paper from where it was tucked into his wide leather belt. Mrs. Webster watched warily, for attached to the belt was a beaded sheath that held a huge knife. Around his hips hung a gun belt and revolver. The hands that unfolded the paper looked strong, and were tanned even darker than his face from exposure to the prairie sun, darker than any white man she had ever seen. "A Mr. Stuart Landers," he finished. He looked at her with soft hazel eyes, a gentle gaze that didn't seem to match the rest of his rugged frame. "This poster says I can find him here. He's looking for an experienced scout."

"Experienced? You don't look old enough to have much experience, but then I guess that's for Mr. Landers to decide."

"Is he here then?"

The woman nodded, squinting and eyeing him even more closely. "You an Indian?"

Colt felt the heat coming to his cheeks. It was a question he was sick of hearing every time he met someone new. "I'm just a man looking for a job."

Mrs. Webster straightened. "That's not what I asked."

Colt sighed. "Ma'am, will you please just get Mr. Landers?"

The woman sniffed. "Follow me." She turned and walked over a polished hardwood floor to a small but neat room with a brick fireplace. Vases and knickknacks lined the mantel. "Can't blame me for askin'," she muttered. "Them high cheekbones and that dark hair and skin, wearin' buckskins and all, what do you expect? I got a right to know who I'm lettin' in my door."

Colt said nothing. He glanced around the room, wondering if the woman scrubbed every item every day. It was hard to believe that anything in this dusty town could be kept so clean. The room was decorated with plants, and little tables, stuffed chairs, and a sofa with flower-patterned upholstery. "I'm Annie Webster," she said, turning to meet his eyes. "You can wait here in the parlor, Mr. Travis. I'll get Mr. Landers."

"Thank you, ma'am."

The woman started out, then stopped and glanced back at him as though trying to tell him with her eyes he had better not break or soil anything. Colt just nodded to her, and she finally left. Colt remained standing, deciding the furniture looked too fine to sit on. He wondered if Mrs. Webster was a Mormon. Several Mormons had chosen to stay in Omaha since they first settled there for one winter a good ten years before.

The Mormons had a way of making something out of nothing, and this house was an example. There were few fine frame buildings in Omaha, more log and tent structures than anything else; but the place considered itself a city nonetheless. Even in its young stage, it was all the city Colt cared to encounter. He felt closed in in the small parlor, as out of place as a buffalo might feel inside a house. He looked down at his boots, hoping he had stamped off enough dust so as not to dirty Mrs. Webster's immaculately polished floor and colorful braided rugs.

"Mr. Travis." Colt turned to see a man of perhaps thirty approaching. He guessed the man's suit was silk, as was the paisley-print vest he wore beneath the perfectly fitting jacket. A gold watch chain hung from the vest pocket. The man looked Colt over appreciatively. "Stuart Landers," he said, putting out his hand. "I am very glad to meet you. Mrs. Webster says you've come in answer to my poster."

Colt took his hand, thinking what a weak grip the man had. Landers's dark hair was already beginning to thin dramatically, his temple area and the area just back from his forehead already bald. In spite of the man's obvious wealth, evident by his dress and manner, there was an honesty to his dark eyes that Colt liked right away. "Well, sir, the words excellent pay kind of struck my eye."

Landers laughed and motioned for Colt to be seated across from him. Colt reluctantly lowered himself into a stuffed chair, deciding not to lean back. "I am afraid I might have made a mistake putting those words in the ad," Landers told him. "Oh, the pay will be excellent, but the ad attracted every sort of man imaginable. Most of those who answered it so far have turned out either not to have near enough experience, or have been so dirty and dangerous-looking that I just felt I couldn't trust them." The man studied Colt intently as he spoke. "Mrs. Webster said you, on the other hand, gave a very good appearance and didn't, uh ... well, to put it bluntly, she said that 'this one doesn't smell bad.'"

Colt frowned, trying to decide whether or not the remark was a compliment. He rested his elbows on his knees, fingering his hat. "Mr. Landers, I don't know what this is all about or why it matters, but before my folks died, I was raised to be clean and respectful. My father was a missionary, came west with the Cherokee back in the thirties. Fact is, my mother was a Cherokee herself, but she and my pa lived in nice houses and brought me up a Christian. I have to say, though, that whether or not a man is clean and educated doesn't have much to do with how good a scout he is."

"Oh, I am sure of that; but this is a situation that calls for both — an experienced scout who can ensure our safety, but a man presentable and mannerly enough to be around my younger sister. She's never been exposed to this rough frontier life. My father won't allow any nonsense around her — foul language, uncleanliness, that sort of thing. You're half Indian, you say?"

Colt felt the defenses rising again, but he did not detect an insulting ring to the words. "Cherokee. Lived most of my early years down in Texas. My folks were both dead by the time I was fourteen, and I've been kind of a wandering man ever since."

"Well, whether or not you're a half — I mean, being part Indian isn't really so important as long as you were raised by a white, Christian father. You speak well and give a good appearance. I must say, you look young, though, Mr. Travis. May I ask your age?"

"I'm twenty, but I've been on my own and lived a man's life for a lot of years. I've been to Oregon and back four times and to California twice. I've fought Indians and killed my share, led wagon trains, hunted buffalo, you name it. I even know a little bit about surveying. After my mother died, my father moved to Austin and worked for a surveyor for a few years down in Texas, and I worked right alongside him."

Landers's eyes lit up. "Surveying! Why, that's wonderful! That kind of experience is just what we need! I knew if I took my time I'd find the right man."

Colt watched him warily. "I ought to tell you I have a partner, name of Slim Jessup," he said, speaking in a soft Texas drawl. "He's a little less prone to bathing, but I'd make sure he cleaned up. He's quite a bit older, taught me everything I know. He'd be here with me now, but he's over seeing a horse doctor about getting a tooth pulled."

"A horse doctor!" Landers grimaced. "For a tooth?"

"Out here you take help wherever you can find it," Colt said. "Slim's in a lot of pain."

Stuart Landers shook his head. "Well, will this Mr. Jessup be willing to come along?"

Colt rose, beginning to feel restless within the four walls. "I can't answer that until you tell me what this is all about, Mr. Landers. I haven't even said I'd do it myself for sure, but even without Slim, I can assure you I can do as good a job as anybody. I have a couple of letters of recommendation from people whose wagon trains I've helped guide west. I hang on to them to help me get new jobs. You want to see them?"

Landers rose. "Well, yes, I suppose I should." He studied Colt more closely as the young man took the letters from a small leather bag that was tied to his belt. He took note of the weapons Colt wore, intuition telling him this young man did indeed know what he was about. Colt handed him the letters, which he had obviously been carrying around for a while. They were worn from being folded and unfolded often, but the writing was still legible.

Colt walked to a window while Landers read the letters. He looked out at the dusty, rutted street in front of the house, again wondering how Mrs. Webster kept the place so clean. It felt strange to be inside a normal home now, even though he had been brought up this way. It had been many years since he had lived in a real house. Since losing his parents, the whole West had become his home, the sky his ceiling, the earth his floor. He had grown to like it that way. Slim said it was the Indian in him.

"Well, these people praise you highly, Mr. Travis," Landers said. He walked over and handed the letters to Colt. "I am impressed and delighted. Time is getting short, and I wasn't sure I would find the right man. You're pretty young, but better qualified than anyone else I've interviewed. It would be good if your partner would accompany you. An extra man never hurts, but as far as protection goes, my father will be bringing along his own little army. What we need is someone who knows the way, at least as far as Fort Laramie; someone who can communicate with the Indians and keep us out of trouble; and a man who knows a little about surveying, well, that's all the better. We want the best, Mr. Travis, since my little sister is coming along." Landers reached into a vest pocket, taking out a little gold case and opening it. "Would you like a smoke, Mr. Travis?"

Colt eyed the five thin cigars inside the case. He nodded, taking one. "Never saw cigars this small before," he commented.

"Oh, they're quite pleasant and very expensive."

Landers closed the case and walked back to sit down. Colt put the thin smoke to his lips and wet the end of it. "I don't understand why your sister has to come along at all," he said then. "The land west of here is no fitting place for a young, pampered girl who's used to a fine house and all the comforts." He moved to the fireplace and took a large flint match from a pewter cup, striking it and lighting the cigar. He puffed on it until the end glowed good and red.

"You don't know Sunny, or my father," Landers answered, smiling almost sadly. "Sunny's got spirit. She'll try anything. And she's the apple of my father's eye. He named her Sunny because he says she brought a new ray of sunshine into his life when she was born. He doesn't go anyplace without her, and she wouldn't let him if he tried." Colt sensed a tiny hint of jealousy in the words, but it vanished in the next sentence. "Sunny's name truly fits her," Landers added, looking away from Colt and out a nearby window. "She has hair as yellow as the sun, eyes as blue as the sky, and a smile that makes it very hard not to love her, at least for me anyway. My older brother, well, I suppose he loves her like any other brother loves a sister, at least a half sister; but he's afraid my father will give her a little too much of the family fortune. Still —"

The man shifted in his chair and looked suddenly embarrassed. "Excuse me, Mr. Travis. I didn't mean to go on like that about personal family matters that are of no interest to you. I never answered your original question — what this job involves." He leaned back, putting his right foot up on the opposite knee. "It's about a railroad, Mr. Travis, a transcontinental railroad — one that will link Chicago with California."

Colt's eyebrows arched, and he could not help grinning. He took another puff on the cigar then, thinking what good tobacco it was. "A railroad clear across the country?" He could not suppress a snicker at the ridiculous idea.

"Go ahead and laugh, Mr. Travis," Landers told him. "You wouldn't be the first man to scoff at the idea. Even I am no exception."

Colt shook his head and took the cigar from his mouth. "To each man his own dream, I guess." He walked back over to the chair but remained standing. "Your father intends to build this railroad?"

"He and several other enterprising men who don't know what else to do with their millions. I am perfectly aware there are plenty who think he's crazy, my older brother included. He won't have anything to do with any of this. Fact is, he thinks my father's foolish dreams are going to bankrupt us." The man rubbed at his neck. "Much as I tend to agree he's a little crazy, I personally don't believe my father would let the family business go under because of his dreams. He and his own father and grandfather worked too hard to build what they have, Mr. Travis. They come from rugged stock. My father and grandfather helped settle Chicago when it was just a trading post — Fort Dearborn. They survived the Pottawatomie massacre of 1812, built a trading and shipping empire that's worth millions today. Started out in the fur trade. We own ships that travel the Great Lakes, and we own a good share of stock in the railroads that come into Chicago. More railroads lead into Chicago now than any other city. I'll bet you didn't know that."

"I don't know a whole lot about anyplace east of here," Colt answered, sitting down again and taking another puff on the cigar. "And call me Colt. Mr. Travis is too formal for me." He met Stuart's eyes. "Actually, I don't even know much about railroads. Only saw a train once in my life myself, when I went through Iowa and met some people who'd taken a train out of Chicago as far west as it went, then went on with wagons. I have to say, I was pretty impressed with that big locomotive, but I'll tell you, laying rails clear across the plains and over two mountain ranges sounds impossible to me. Hell, it's hard enough to get mules and wagons over those mountains; but then I guess that's not my problem. All I want to know is what my role is in all of this."

Landers pulled at a dark, neatly trimmed mustache. "My father is on his way to Omaha. He'll be here in a few days. He wants an experienced scout who can give him a rough idea of what would be the best route to take in building a railroad west. He just wants to get a feel of the land, to see if it really could be done. He'll need to get a lot of financial backing for this, and before he can get others involved and talk them into investing, he wants to be sure he knows exactly what he's talking about." The man rose and began pacing. "Oh, there has been talk around Washington about such a railroad for a long time now, Mr. — I mean, Colt. There have even been one or two surveys done." He ran a hand through his thinning hair. "My father is convinced that Congress will eventually pass a bill supporting such a railroad. He wants to get in on the ground floor — sees the possibilities. If it is a success, he'll be an even richer man. Of course, if it fails, he'll be a much poorer one. At any rate, he asked me to come out here and set things up, find a good scout." He glanced at Colt and smiled nervously, a hint of fear in his eyes. "I would have hated to face him and tell him that after all this time I hadn't come up with anyone. When my father barks, people jump, except for my older brother, Vince. They never have gotten along very well. But my father really is a good man, Colt. He's just a man who worked hard all his life and is used to ordering people around, except for Sunny. She's got him wrapped right around her little finger, but she doesn't seem to take advantage of it."


Excerpted from Thunder on the Plains by Rosanne Bittner. Copyright © 1992 Rosanne Bittner. Excerpted by permission of Sourcebooks, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Thunder on the Plains 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thunder on the Plains is one of many favorits. I will read it over and over again. I dont know if there is a part 2 but if there is send it my way!!
queenofhearts60 More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading this book
MyBookAddictionandMore 4 months ago
A re-issue from the 1990's, but still an epic tale. An epic, and gripping love story that spans years. Filled with grief, tears, struggles, turmoil,pain, love and romance. This tale spans across the Old West. Well written with intrigue, danger, secrets and a few twists and turns. Not to mention a half-breed Cowboy, a landowner's Cowgirl daughter add a transcontinental railroad project into the mix and together readers are guaranteed an epic love story. Think "Hell on Wheels", the epic T.V. saga. An absolute delight to read. I look forward to the next adventure from Ms. Bittner. A must read for fans of Americana Historical Romance, the Transcontinental railroad, epic sagas, and family sagas. An enjoyable and satisfying read! *Received for an honest review from the publisher via Net Gallery* Rating: 4 Heat rating: Mild Reviewed by: AprilR, courtesy of My Book Addiction and More
gaele 4 months ago
Covering a twelve year span and incorporating actual historical events, Bittner reimagines a scenario in which a business tycoon’s daughter and a half-Cherokee scout defy danger and convention for love. Bo Landers, a Chicago businessman, has a dream: a railroad line that stretches from Chicago to the Pacific Coast. Not content to dance with failure, he decides that scouting the best route is the most prudent option, and sets about gathering a team. Sunny Landers is her father’s daughter: intelligent, driven and above all, committed to his dream. In on the first scouting trip when she is just fifteen, she’s intrigued by the half-indian scout that her father has hired. Colt is half-Cherokee, familiar with life on the plains and comfortable with his ability to lead the party. He’s intrigued by the heiress, but her father is not willing to allow their relationship to develop. The Landers return to Chicago, and the negotiations and dance with the government begins. Years later, Sunny is struggling to see her father’s dream come to fruition, and she and Colt come face to face. He’s content with his life, she’s most comfortable in Chicago, and the two can’t seem to find a middle ground, let alone acceptance from her family. But then, the heart wants what it does. Lovely descriptions and wonderful insets of actual events that richen the story and bring a sense of the struggles that were faced in the railroad building combined neatly with the rather trite and familiar story of the hero and heroine. Two different worlds, outlooks and circumstances clash, adjust and then combine to bring the two together. While you know (it wouldn’t be a romance if you didn’t) they will finally be together, the journey is the fun, and in this case, the moments away from the relationship, particularly Colt’s personal history and life, are far more intriguing than their relationship machinations. Repeated phrases appear, often to the point of distraction, hammering home points that would have been better served with more show and less tell. Strangely enough, the descriptions, the actual use of history and the depictions of daily struggles of life during the railway construction are the moments that stood out as near perfect, keeping my interest in this story. A read that won’t be devoured in one day, the slow progression of the story allows you to take your time and enjoy, and readers of more contemporary historical romances will find the construction and storyline reminiscent of the late 80’s early 90’s in feel. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via NetGalley for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility.
LesiaCh4 4 months ago
Thunder on the Plains is an epic adventure and love story by Rosanne Bittner that could be made into a movie. Yes, my opinion of course, but this book has everything, from adventure, to love, tragedy, triumph, and victory, and takes place from Utah, to New York across the wide open plains of Nebraska. It touches on the Civil War and the building of the Union Pacific Railroad. This is a sweet, sometimes tragic love story of two people who fall in love, but social class and progress team up to keep them apart. Rosanne Bittner did a wonderful writing job of putting together this story, that covers so much time and place. If you love the American west, and the Plains, this book is for you. It's a love story that I'm glad I read, one you shouldn't miss.
Pure_Jonel 5 months ago
I enjoyed not only the time period of the novel, but also the time span. Bittner writes about the lives of her characters, not simply a snippet into it. Years passed without me feeling I was missing anything or if time was running away from me. It also means that the relationship between the main characters was not, in any sense, rushed. The low key, rolling style of the tale was perfectly suited to the story at hand, heightening and highlighting certain events throughout. The characters that Bittner creates truly enhance the tale. The sense of impossibility yet necessity between them was unforgettable. Not only were they fantastic individuals in and of themselves, but they were so periodically correct, adding to the flair of the novel. I wanted to get to know these individuals on so many levels. I found myself rooting for them throughout and loving the journey that they took me on. Bittner writes epic romance in the truest sense. She weaves magic through the pages as she takes readers back in time on a remarkable journey. Please note that I received a complimentary copy of this work in exchange for an honest review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Each time I finish one of RB's historic books, I am sure that is my fav - until I read her next. This one earned its place in my top five.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RtBBlog More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Sarah L. Book provided by NetGalley for review Review originally posted at Romancing the Book Thunder on the Plains is one of the best books I have read so far this year, in fact, this is going on my all-time favorites list. At 528 pages it is a quite a bit longer than my typical average read however it kept me fully engaged throughout the entire story. Ironically, I read this book while on the road for our vacation from Wisconsin to Omaha, Nebraska. The Union Pacific Railroad and Omaha play a huge role in this novel. It felt a bit nostalgic to be traveling a similar path as the characters in the book. We even happened to drive by the Union Pacific building although I’m sure it looked much different in Sunny’s day. Ms. Bittner has a way of bringing the pages and characters to life which pulled me right in from page one and I hated having to put it down for even one second. I loved getting to know both Sunny and Colt and there were so many ups and downs and twists and turns, I had no clue if things would ever work out for them in the end. I’m not sure why I haven’t read any of Ms. Bittner’s work in several years but I will say that I have plans to remedy that right away and hope to get my hands on her entire backlist. Thunder on the Plains is a story that I thoroughly enjoyed and look forward to reading again and again in the future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you've read any of Rosanne Bittner's books you'll want to read this one - the story line is very good and keeps you interested. Some very happy and some quite sad parts but that's her writing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
marabee More than 1 year ago
Love all of Rosanne Bittner's books. She never fails to keep us turning the pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is another great historical fiction novel that keeps you wanting to read more! It's easy to get enveloped in Sunny's and Colt's stories! Worth reading, if you enjoy this type of book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the best book i ever read.The rhythm surrounding me in my memory of New york .The romance and writing expression is unforgettable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Except for her "Savage Destiny" series, this is my favorite Bittner novel. It has everything I look for in an historical romance. I highly recommend this to fans of the genre.
Mirella More than 1 year ago
Rosanne Bittner is no stranger to Western romances. Thunder on the Plains takes us back in time to the American frontier in the days before the railroad. Despite all the naysayers, Bo Landers, a wealthy Chicago business man, is determined to see his dream of building a transcontinental railroad fulfilled. So he takes his only child, a fifteen year old daughter named Sunny, with him on a journey to the American west to survey the landscape to determine the best routes. He hires Colt Travis, a handsome and wild young man, half native, half white, as scout. When Bo notices the sparks between Colt and Sunny, he sets out to keep them separated. He did not want his wealthy white socialite daughter marrying a poor, lone, half-breed below her class. But as much as Colt tries to stay away from Sunny, as the years pass, they continue to be drawn together. Although classified as a romance novel, I felt this novel resembled more of a pure, mainstream historical novel. There is a great deal of historic fact pertaining to the development of the railroad, the politics, and the wealthy magnates of the time. Equal emphasis was placed on the history as it was with building the romance. A fact I liked since this makes the novel more realistic. Sometimes, the storyline slowed due to an overabundance of historic facts presented, but the relationship between Colt and Sunny kept me involved and reading. Bittner has a knack for writing strong, believable characters who truly seem to jump off the pages. I enjoyed this novel very much and look forward to reading more of Rosanne Bittner’s wonderful stories and characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Can i join your clan i am a she-cat named DarkKit (later darkfur)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Smiles at frozen. "Glad i can help."