Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None

Overview

This revelatory new translation by strips Thus Spoke Zarathustra down to its foundations in Gothic horror, and discovers a much darker book than previously understood. Not content to focus erringly on God is dead, this new translation sings a dithyramb to the earth at the same time as it mercilessly hunts down the concept of humanity to its theological bedrock. Epic and neo-classical, minimalist and ultra-modern; at times aggressive and confrontational, at others tender, lyrical, grotesque and comical - this is ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (1) from $1.99   
  • Used (1) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(348)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Acceptable
2011-03-10 Paperback Fair Paperback. WRITING/NOTATIONS seen THROUGHOUT the book. Some definite cover wear. All orders are carefully packaged and processed within 24 hours.

Ships from: winston salem, NC

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

This revelatory new translation by strips Thus Spoke Zarathustra down to its foundations in Gothic horror, and discovers a much darker book than previously understood. Not content to focus erringly on God is dead, this new translation sings a dithyramb to the earth at the same time as it mercilessly hunts down the concept of humanity to its theological bedrock. Epic and neo-classical, minimalist and ultra-modern; at times aggressive and confrontational, at others tender, lyrical, grotesque and comical - this is the closest reproduction of the tone and tenor of the German original available in English today. One of the most controversial books in the history of European literature it is a founding classic of modernism in philosophy and poetics.

Zarathustra - Star of Gold - the sun-worshipping prophet of the earliest strain of monotheism, returns to recant and condemn his own ideas in the name of an entity he calls the √úbermensch. He wanders through a familiar land whose customs, laws, and values have been mortgaged to religion and commerce. The people there believe they exist at the summit of civilization. Zarathustra educates them that the opposite is true.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781460970812
  • Publisher: CreateSpace
  • Publication date: 3/10/2011
  • Pages: 218
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a 19th-century German philosopher, poet, composer and classical philologist. He wrote critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and aphorism.

Nietzsche's influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism, nihilism and postmodernism.

Stephen Metcalf is a Professor of Linguistics at Warwick University, UK.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Nova Apocalypsis
Nietzsche's reputation has always thrived on its appeal to the anomalous, that 'transgression against a secret, unfamiliar rule of the game.' Against a European age of optimism in science and technology; of material and territorial expansion (usually at the expense of Asia and Africa); and of a triumphant tone in philosophical biology that, for the first time, tore the natural world out of the phantasm of divine origins and into the idea, dialectical or otherwise, of endless progress - he offered little more than complete disgust. His term for all this apparent progress was nihilism. This is what attracted Stefan George, Nietzsche's first populariser, to his anachronistic, 'untimely' aesthetic. Nova Apocalypsis is, in its brutal doggerel, atypical of George's melancholic, introspective and highly lyrical Stimmung. It is a howl of rage which, while lamenting the fall of the Christian religion and the insectoid communion that consummates itself in its dust, also uncompromisingly cribs its imagery from Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra. In this poem, we are not told who the God of the Flies, a familiar, biblical image of the Devil, might be - we are just left with the sinister image of the larval hatching of his reign. However, a companion piece to this poem (both of which were written in 1907), entitled der Widerchrist, is more explicit. Here we encounter the Lord of the Vermin, who creates things from dirt that look just like gold; and proclaims himself to be greater than the dying Endchrist in his willingness to attribute the miraculating forces of production to himself, as material wealth lures the mad massing Volk to squander what remains of all yesteryear's charms, before dying like swine in a burning farmyard, as the call of the Last Judgement sounds. In spite of all the apocalyptic, biblical imagery, George's real lament is for the mechanization of the German language under the Kaiserreich (1871 - 1918). The voice of the God of the Flies is both the embodiment of rapidly advancing capitalism and, probably, that of the Kaiser. ..... from the translator's introduction
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Thus spoke Zarathustra : a book for all and none
Zarathustra's prologue 3
The speeches of Zarathustra 16
On the three metamorphoses 16
On the teachers of virtue 17
On the hinterworldly 20
On the despisers of the body 22
On the passions of pleasure and pain 24
On the pale criminal 26
On reading and writing 27
On the tree on the mountain 29
On the preachers of death 31
On war and warriors 33
On the new idol 34
On the flies of the market place 36
On chastity 39
On the friend 40
On a thousand and one goals 42
On love for the neighbor 44
On the way of the creator 46
On little women old and young 48
On the adder's bite 50
On child and marriage 51
On free death 53
On the bestowing virtue 55
The child with the mirror 63
On the blessed isles 65
On the pitying 67
On priests 69
On the virtuous 72
On the rabble 74
On the tarantulas 76
On the famous wise men 79
The night song 81
The dance song 83
The grave song 85
On self-overcoming 88
On the sublime ones 90
On the land of education 93
On immaculate perception 95
On scholars 97
On poets 99
On great events 102
The soothsayer 105
On redemption 109
On human prudence 113
The stillest hour 115
The wanderer 121
On the vision and the riddle 123
On unwilling bliss 127
Before sunrise 130
On virtue that makes small 133
On the Mount of Olives 137
On passing by 140
On apostates 143
The homecoming 146
On the three evils 149
On the spirit of gravity 153
On old and new tablets 156
The convalescent 173
On great longing 179
The other dance song 181
The seven seals (or : the yes and amen song) 184
The honey sacrifice 191
The cry of distress 193
Conversation with the kings 196
The leech 200
The magician 203
Retired 209
The ugliest human being 212
The voluntary beggar 216
The shadow 220
At noon 223
The welcome 225
The Last Supper 230
On the higher man 231
The song of melancholy 240
On science 245
Among daughters of the desert 247
The awakening 252
The ass festival 255
The sleepwalker song 258
The sign 264
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)