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Thus Spoke Zarathustra
     

Thus Spoke Zarathustra

4.3 58
by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
 

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Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None (German: Also sprach Zarathustra: Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen) is a philosophical novel by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same", the parable on the "death of God", and the

Overview

Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None (German: Also sprach Zarathustra: Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen) is a philosophical novel by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same", the parable on the "death of God", and the "prophecy" of the Overman.
Described by Nietzsche himself as "the deepest ever written", the book is a dense and esoteric treatise on philosophy and morality, featuring as protagonist a fictionalized Zarathustra. A central irony of the text is that Nietzsche mimics the style of the Bible in order to present ideas which fundamentally oppose Christian and Jewish morality and tradition. (Source: wikipedia.org)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781618950635
Publisher:
Bibliotech Press
Publication date:
02/14/2012
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.68(d)

Read an Excerpt

Nova Apocalypsis Nietzsche's reputation has always thrived on its appeal to the anomalous, that 'transgression against a secret, unfamiliar rule of the game.' Against a European age of optimism in science and technology; of material and territorial expansion (usually at the expense of Asia and Africa); and of a triumphant tone in philosophical biology that, for the first time, tore the natural world out of the phantasm of divine origins and into the idea, dialectical or otherwise, of endless progress - he offered little more than complete disgust. His term for all this apparent progress was nihilism. This is what attracted Stefan George, Nietzsche's first populariser, to his anachronistic, 'untimely' aesthetic. Nova Apocalypsis is, in its brutal doggerel, atypical of George's melancholic, introspective and highly lyrical Stimmung. It is a howl of rage which, while lamenting the fall of the Christian religion and the insectoid communion that consummates itself in its dust, also uncompromisingly cribs its imagery from Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra. In this poem, we are not told who the God of the Flies, a familiar, biblical image of the Devil, might be - we are just left with the sinister image of the larval hatching of his reign. However, a companion piece to this poem (both of which were written in 1907), entitled der Widerchrist, is more explicit. Here we encounter the Lord of the Vermin, who creates things from dirt that look just like gold; and proclaims himself to be greater than the dying Endchrist in his willingness to attribute the miraculating forces of production to himself, as material wealth lures the mad massing Volk to squander what remains of all yesteryear's charms, before dying like swine in a burning farmyard, as the call of the Last Judgement sounds. In spite of all the apocalyptic, biblical imagery, George's real lament is for the mechanization of the German language under the Kaiserreich (1871 - 1918). The voice of the God of the Flies is both the embodiment of rapidly advancing capitalism and, probably, that of the Kaiser. ..... from the translator's introduction

Meet the Author

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a 19th-century German philosopher, poet, composer and classical philologist. He wrote critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and aphorism.

Nietzsche's influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism, nihilism and postmodernism.

Stephen Metcalf is a Professor of Linguistics at Warwick University, UK.

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Thus Spoke Zarathustra 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 58 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The most important aspect of this book is to keep an open mind. Nietzsche is presenting the reader with the character of Zarathustra, yet we must keep in mind that the book is Zarathustra's journey as well as our own. At the point of Zarathustra's maturation the reader will have completed the journey as well. An excellent read, this book is filled with metaphors and aphorisms that may take a second read to fully comprehend. However, I highly recommend this book to any one who even comes to this page. This is the culmination of Nietzsche's work as he himself said.
unheimlich27 More than 1 year ago
Clancy Martin (the 'translator') pretends that this is an original 'from scratch' translation: it is not. For the most part it is not much more than a very light revision of the Thomas Common translation (e.g removing archaic verb-endings and pronouns), occasionally enriched with renderings lifted straight from either Hollingdale or Kaufmann (e.g. 'lie around lurking and spy and smirking' - is Kaufmann's work). Plagiarism aside, however, or perhaps precisely because of it, it is perhaps the best available translation of Zarathustra, - even if in one or two places it is let down by some rather silly renderings (though at least they are Clancy's own work).
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book educates us on the reality of 'eternal recurrence' and how Nietzsche would hope that someone would one day rise and personify themselves to be (or live) like his Zarathustra but to follow on their own path to reach this goal. The other lesson learned here is that solitude for each individual in this world wouldn't be a such bad idea from time to time. In fact, that may be the divine secret on how to reach a certain goal expressed in this book. Ubermensch
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
nietzsche literally changed my entire life, and i'm still only in high school. since first reading beyond good and evil and now just finishing thus spoke zarathustra, the entire foundation of the way i perceive, process, and formulate thoughts and ideas has changed in a way that i can only describe as beautiful. "amor fati" is and probably forever shall be my life slogan (along with "so it goes" from vonnegut, of course). this post will probably get a bunch of hate from people who claim to know everything about nietzsche saying "'amor fati'?!?!?! but nietzsche's point wasn't for you to accept his ideas, but to create your own!" whatever. i like it. seriously, this and all of his other books, well worth the read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fabulous new translation. Great introduction by famous Nietzsche scholars. A must-read if you are interested in philosophy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great. Nietzsche's use of metaphor and irony is very hard to understand but nonetheless very poetic. If you finish this book i recommend his next work "Beyond good and evil". This book consists of Nietzsche's philosophy on the ubermensch, eternal recurrence and i believe master-slave morality.
Eric_Chapman More than 1 year ago
This work powerfully embodies Nietzsche's athiestic existentialism. Through parable, he reaches back into our past for symbols that hit home for each of us, consciously or not. You can sense Nietzsche's internal struggle to reconcile disgust with the modern man and the faith of belief in mans' future greatness. Thus Spoke Zarathustra is an incredible novel, not just for the content, but also because it reveals Nietzsche's internal struggle that created his external character.
VladimirMG More than 1 year ago
Best writing I have ever seen. Great man! When you read this be in awe because people should really love life. Even some of my own philosophy is in it. Respect this book and get ready to be inspired!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Nietzsche¿s finest work, a mid-point between his break with Schopenhauer and his break with sanity. The book relates the adventures of Zarathustra, who descends from his lonely mountain wilderness in search of the ¿higher man¿. The result in a tour de force philosophical blitzkrieg on all philosophical sentiments. This book will make you question, will make you think, will inspire you, but above all, it is a book that, when finished, will make you say, ¿I do not believe in Nietzsche¿ as you begin to think for yourself. Exactly what Nietzsche intended. ¿And to ask this once more- today, is greatness possible?¿ -Nietzsche
Guest More than 1 year ago
Human, all-to-human, we are, but we can become nothing more as ourselves. Attempts can be made but they will all fail, for our preconceptions will not so readily change. I believe that I live by my own will, that I have abandoned that which roots down this decadence, this life of man, but I am a fool and a hipocrate. My mindset is such, but the fleeting thoughts of inheritance cloud that which to me is clear. I am everyone and no one, yet both at the same time. Yes, I wish to transcend beyond the transcendent, but the fact that I still label him as such permits me from doing so. I cannot live as a camel, bearing such insipid thoughts, but nor can I destroy them as the lion for I lack the the furiosity. I am a fool, perhaps a higher man, damned by the dragon, be he God or donkey, and lost in this path, this continuation of the same; so, let the festival repeat.---My thoughts after reading Thus Spoke Zarathustra---.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I find that 'Thus spoke Zarathustra' was one of the most captavating and eyeopening books of our time .True he was quite overzealoused about the topics of God and the Christian church,but if it were not for him...we would not have the same apporach to religion as we do today!So I say, 'Thank you' to the man who defined a century!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
&pi &pi &pi &pi &pi &pi &pi &pi :3
skuggantroll More than 1 year ago
is there anyone else out there that imagined zarathustra looking like jim morrison?
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