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Thus Spoke Zarathustra
     

Thus Spoke Zarathustra

4.3 58
by Friedrich Nietzsche
 

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A 19th-century literary masterpiece, tremendously influential in the arts and in philosophy, uses the Persian religious leader Zarathustra to voice the author's views, including the introduction of the controversial doctrine of the Übermensch, or "superman," a term later perverted by Nazi propagandists. A passionate, quasi-biblical style is employed to inspire

Overview

A 19th-century literary masterpiece, tremendously influential in the arts and in philosophy, uses the Persian religious leader Zarathustra to voice the author's views, including the introduction of the controversial doctrine of the Übermensch, or "superman," a term later perverted by Nazi propagandists. A passionate, quasi-biblical style is employed to inspire readers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781627932806
Publisher:
Start Publishing LLC
Publication date:
07/01/2013
Series:
Unabridged Start Publishing LLC
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
232
Sales rank:
1,100,059
File size:
386 KB

Meet the Author

The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche was born in Prussia in 1844. After the death of his father, a Lutheran minister, Nietzsche was raised from the age of five by his mother in a household of women. In 1869 he was appointed Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, where he taught until 1879 when poor health forced him to retire. He never recovered from a nervous breakdown in 1889 and died eleven years later. Known for saying that “god is dead,” Nietzsche propounded his metaphysical construct of the superiority of the disciplined individual (superman) living in the present over traditional values derived from Christianity and its emphasis on heavenly rewards. His ideas were appropriated by the Fascists, who turned his theories into social realities that he had never intended.

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Thus Spoke Zarathustra 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 58 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The most important aspect of this book is to keep an open mind. Nietzsche is presenting the reader with the character of Zarathustra, yet we must keep in mind that the book is Zarathustra's journey as well as our own. At the point of Zarathustra's maturation the reader will have completed the journey as well. An excellent read, this book is filled with metaphors and aphorisms that may take a second read to fully comprehend. However, I highly recommend this book to any one who even comes to this page. This is the culmination of Nietzsche's work as he himself said.
unheimlich27 More than 1 year ago
Clancy Martin (the 'translator') pretends that this is an original 'from scratch' translation: it is not. For the most part it is not much more than a very light revision of the Thomas Common translation (e.g removing archaic verb-endings and pronouns), occasionally enriched with renderings lifted straight from either Hollingdale or Kaufmann (e.g. 'lie around lurking and spy and smirking' - is Kaufmann's work). Plagiarism aside, however, or perhaps precisely because of it, it is perhaps the best available translation of Zarathustra, - even if in one or two places it is let down by some rather silly renderings (though at least they are Clancy's own work).
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book educates us on the reality of 'eternal recurrence' and how Nietzsche would hope that someone would one day rise and personify themselves to be (or live) like his Zarathustra but to follow on their own path to reach this goal. The other lesson learned here is that solitude for each individual in this world wouldn't be a such bad idea from time to time. In fact, that may be the divine secret on how to reach a certain goal expressed in this book. Ubermensch
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
nietzsche literally changed my entire life, and i'm still only in high school. since first reading beyond good and evil and now just finishing thus spoke zarathustra, the entire foundation of the way i perceive, process, and formulate thoughts and ideas has changed in a way that i can only describe as beautiful. "amor fati" is and probably forever shall be my life slogan (along with "so it goes" from vonnegut, of course). this post will probably get a bunch of hate from people who claim to know everything about nietzsche saying "'amor fati'?!?!?! but nietzsche's point wasn't for you to accept his ideas, but to create your own!" whatever. i like it. seriously, this and all of his other books, well worth the read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fabulous new translation. Great introduction by famous Nietzsche scholars. A must-read if you are interested in philosophy.
skuggantroll More than 1 year ago
is there anyone else out there that imagined zarathustra looking like jim morrison?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great. Nietzsche's use of metaphor and irony is very hard to understand but nonetheless very poetic. If you finish this book i recommend his next work "Beyond good and evil". This book consists of Nietzsche's philosophy on the ubermensch, eternal recurrence and i believe master-slave morality.
Eric_Chapman More than 1 year ago
This work powerfully embodies Nietzsche's athiestic existentialism. Through parable, he reaches back into our past for symbols that hit home for each of us, consciously or not. You can sense Nietzsche's internal struggle to reconcile disgust with the modern man and the faith of belief in mans' future greatness. Thus Spoke Zarathustra is an incredible novel, not just for the content, but also because it reveals Nietzsche's internal struggle that created his external character.
VladimirMG More than 1 year ago
Best writing I have ever seen. Great man! When you read this be in awe because people should really love life. Even some of my own philosophy is in it. Respect this book and get ready to be inspired!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Nietzsche¿s finest work, a mid-point between his break with Schopenhauer and his break with sanity. The book relates the adventures of Zarathustra, who descends from his lonely mountain wilderness in search of the ¿higher man¿. The result in a tour de force philosophical blitzkrieg on all philosophical sentiments. This book will make you question, will make you think, will inspire you, but above all, it is a book that, when finished, will make you say, ¿I do not believe in Nietzsche¿ as you begin to think for yourself. Exactly what Nietzsche intended. ¿And to ask this once more- today, is greatness possible?¿ -Nietzsche
Guest More than 1 year ago
Human, all-to-human, we are, but we can become nothing more as ourselves. Attempts can be made but they will all fail, for our preconceptions will not so readily change. I believe that I live by my own will, that I have abandoned that which roots down this decadence, this life of man, but I am a fool and a hipocrate. My mindset is such, but the fleeting thoughts of inheritance cloud that which to me is clear. I am everyone and no one, yet both at the same time. Yes, I wish to transcend beyond the transcendent, but the fact that I still label him as such permits me from doing so. I cannot live as a camel, bearing such insipid thoughts, but nor can I destroy them as the lion for I lack the the furiosity. I am a fool, perhaps a higher man, damned by the dragon, be he God or donkey, and lost in this path, this continuation of the same; so, let the festival repeat.---My thoughts after reading Thus Spoke Zarathustra---.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I find that 'Thus spoke Zarathustra' was one of the most captavating and eyeopening books of our time .True he was quite overzealoused about the topics of God and the Christian church,but if it were not for him...we would not have the same apporach to religion as we do today!So I say, 'Thank you' to the man who defined a century!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
&pi &pi &pi &pi &pi &pi &pi &pi :3
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