Thyroid Diet: Manage Your Metabolism for Lasting Weight Loss

( 38 )

Overview

For more than 25 million Americans it may be, due to the metabolic slowdown of a malfunctioning thyroid gland. The Thyroid Diet will help many previously unsuccessful dieters get diagnosed and treated -- and proper thyroid treatment might be all that's needed to successfully lose weight. Even after optimal treatment, however, weight problems plague many thyroid patients. For those patients, The Thyroid Diet will identify the many frustrating impediments to weight loss, and offer solutions -- both conventional and...
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Overview

For more than 25 million Americans it may be, due to the metabolic slowdown of a malfunctioning thyroid gland. The Thyroid Diet will help many previously unsuccessful dieters get diagnosed and treated -- and proper thyroid treatment might be all that's needed to successfully lose weight. Even after optimal treatment, however, weight problems plague many thyroid patients. For those patients, The Thyroid Diet will identify the many frustrating impediments to weight loss, and offer solutions -- both conventional and alternative -- to help. Discussing optimal dietary changes, thyroid-damaging foods to avoid, and metabolism-supporting herbs and supplements, it contains several different eating plans, food lists, and a set of delicious and healthy gourmet recipes. With handy worksheets to use in weight-loss tracking and a special resource section featuring Web sites, books, and support groups, here is vital help for millions.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780594550068
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/17/2004
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Diagnosed with a thyroid disease in 1995, Mary J. Shomon has transformed her health challenges into a mission as an internationally known patient advocate. She is the founder and editor in chief of several thyroid, autoimmune, and nutrition newsletters, as well as the Internet’s most popular thyroid disease website, www.thyroid-info.com. She lives in Kensington, Maryland.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Introduction 1
Part 1 The Thyroid Connection 11
1. Could You Have an Undiagnosed Thyroid Condition? 13
2. Thyroid Diagnosis, Treatment, and Optimization Challenges 40
Part 2 Metabolism, Weight Loss, and the Thyroid 65
3. Food and Metabolism 67
4. How Thyroid Dysfunction Affects Metabolism and Weight 83
Part 3 Key Weight-Loss Issues 99
5. Blood Sugar, Hormones, Allergies, and Toxins 101
6. Drugs, Supplements, and Herbs 115
7. Stress, Mind, and Body 132
8. Exercise 152
Part 4 The Thyroid Diet 173
9. Your Thyroid Diet Plans 175
10. What to Eat: Recipes 199
11. Guidelines to Live and Eat By 266
Part 5 Moving Forward 289
12. What to Do After You've Tried Everything 291
13. Keeping the Faith 310
Appendices 325
A. Resources 327
B. Selected References 361
Index 375
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First Chapter

The Thyroid Diet
Manage Your Metabolism for Lasting Weight Loss

Chapter One

Could You Have an
Undiagnosed Thyroid
Condition?

Knowledge is of two kinds: we know a subject ourselves,
or we know where we can find information about it.
-- Samuel Johnson

The thyroid is a small bowtie or butterfly-shaped gland located in your neck around the windpipe, behind and below your Adam's apple area. The thyroid produces several hormones, but two are absolutely essential: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). These hormones help oxygen get into your cells and are critical to your body's ability to produce energy. This role in delivering oxygen and energy makes your thyroid the master gland of metabolism.

The thyroid has the only cells in the body capable of absorbing iodine. It takes in the iodine obtained through food, iodized salt, or supplements, and combines that iodine with the amino acid tyrosine. The thyroid then converts the iodine/tyrosine combination into the hormones T3 and T4. The 3 and the 4 refer to the number of iodine molecules in each thyroid hormone molecule.

Of all the hormones produced by your thyroid when it is functioning properly, approximately 80% will be T4 and 20% will be T3. Of the two, T3 is the biologically active hormone -- the one that actually has an effect at the cellular level. So while the thyroid produces some T3, the rest of the T3 needed by the body is actually formed when the body converts T4 to T3. Once released by the thyroid, the T3 and T4 travel through the bloodstream. The purpose is to help cells convert oxygen and calories into energy to serve as the basic fuel of your metabolism.

As mentioned, the thyroid produces some T3. But the rest of the T3 needed by the body is actually formed from the mostly inactive T4 by a process sometimes referred to as T4 to T3 conversion. This conversion can take place in the thyroid, the liver, the brain, and in other organs and tissues.

As T3 circulates through your bloodstream, it attaches to and enters your cells via receptor sites on the membrane of the cells. Once inside the cells, T3 increases cell metabolic rate, including body temperature, and stimulates the cells to produce a number of different hormones, enzymes, neurotransmitters, and muscle tissue. T3 also helps your cells use oxygen and release carbon dioxide, which helps smooth metabolic function.

So how does the thyroid know how much T4 and T3 to produce? The release of hormones from the thyroid is part of a feedback process. The hypothalamus, a part of the brain, emits thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). The release of TRH tells your pituitary gland to in turn produce thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). This TSH that circulates in your bloodstream is the messenger that tells your thyroid to make the thyroid hormones T4 and T3, sending them into your bloodstream. When there is enough thyroid hormone, the pituitary makes less TSH, which is a signal to the thyroid that it can slow down hormone production. It's a smoothly functioning system when it works properly. When something interferes with the system and the feedback process doesn't work, thyroid problems can develop.

Prevalence

At minimum, experts estimate that there are 20 million thyroid sufferers in the United States, and 13 million of them are undiagnosed. The majority of people with thyroid conditions have Hashimoto's disease, an autoimmune condition that causes hypothyroidism -- an underactive thyroid. Thyroid disease is actually the most common autoimmune condition in America today.

Women are seven times more likely than men to develop thyroid problems. Women face as much as a one in five chance of developing a thyroid problem during their lifetime. The risk of thyroid disease increases with age; by age 74, the 16% prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in men is nearly as high as the 21% rate seen in women.

Thyroid cancer is the fastest-growing cancer in the United States. The incidence has increased 20% since the late 1990s, and experts believe it's due to increased radiation exposure from nuclear accidents and x-rays.

Thyroid problems are also common in many other countries, particularly areas covered at one time by glaciers, where iodine is not present in the soil and in foods. In many of these countries, an enlarged thyroid, known as goiter, is seen in as many as one in five people and is usually due to iodine deficiency. Around the world, an estimated 8% of the population has goiter, most commonly women. Thyroid problems, including autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid cancer, are more prevalent in the areas around and downwind of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident.

Overview of Conditions

The main conditions that can occur with the thyroid include

  • Hypothyroidism -- when the thyroid is underactive and isn't producing sufficient thyroid hormone
  • Hyperthyroidism -- when the thyroid is overactive and is producing too much thyroid hormone
  • Goiter -- when the thyroid becomes enlarged, due to hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism
  • Nodules -- when lumps, usually benign, grow in the thyroid, sometimes causing it to become hypothyroid or hyperthyroid
  • Thyroid cancer -- when lumps or nodules in the thyroid are malignant
  • Postpartum thyroiditis -- when the thyroid is temporarily inflamed, in addition to hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism triggered after pregnancy

Causes and Risk Factors

The most common causes of thyroid conditions are autoimmune diseases, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease, where the body's immune defenses inappropriately target the thyroid as an invader. Hashimoto's disease may cause periods of hyperthyroidism, followed by permanent hypothyroidism after the immune system destroys the gland's ability to produce thyroid hormone. Graves' disease typically causes an overproduction of thyroid hormone that can become life-threatening if not treated. If you have Graves' disease, you'll most likely receive antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine, or surgery that will partially or entirely disable the thyroid's ability to produce thyroid hormone. Most people will become hypothyroid after treatment for Graves' disease ...

The Thyroid Diet
Manage Your Metabolism for Lasting Weight Loss
. Copyright © by Mary Shomon. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

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(7)

4 Star

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(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2009

    I Wish My Endocrinologist Would Read This Book !!!

    My headline says it all. My endocrinologist needs to read this book. This book gave me ESSENTIAL information that I need to have and haven't had for the 4 years since I was diagnosed with thyroid disease. I read this book in 3 days. It was so informative, interesting, and even compelling. If you have thyroid disease, please read this book. You will be happy you did.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 2, 2009

    This book helped me after 25 years!!

    I have suffered first from hyperthyroid and now from hypothyroid, and I have always been misdiangosed.

    I read this book, highlighted all the points I could never "say" for myself, because of the "brain fog" and showed them to my doctor. He kept my book for a week and read it himself.

    He has a greater understanding of the thyroid now as well!!

    This was a great book that will help anyone who may read it.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 17, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Okay book

    I think Mary has her heart in the right place when she wrote the Thyroid diet. However, as a patient who has an underactive thyroid for years, the book falls short on giving all the information that I need. For example, I just read the Perfect 10 Diet which addressed thyroid in more details, and had more information. For example, The thyroid Diet falls short from discussing the negative effect of a high protein diet such As atkins that I was following on thyroid or the role of Splenda that I also used. It is a good book, but falls short on giving all the right information for me to improve my thyroid or health.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 27, 2009

    The Thyroid Diet

    It is not simply enough to introduce weight loss programs; Shomon also examines conditions, processing of food, metabolism, blood sugar, allergies, etc., in an easy to understand language.

    The book I just bought was published in 2004 and needs to be updated. Opinions currently differ on subjects such as basal temperature, test thresholds, etc. Numerous types of diets have come and gone since that time.

    The information provided, however, was still very helpful.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 13, 2010

    Don't waste your money

    I got this book after been diagnosted with underactive Thyroid disorder. I was looking for something comprehensive, written by someone who seemed to be at least more knowledgable than this. This book was the standard diet vomit that is in every diet book you pick up. It didn't get into the compromises or real tips on what you should do about soy products and what you should supplement cruciferous with...this book left me very dissappointed.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 24, 2009

    VERY HELPFUL

    I enjoyed this book. It was very easy to understand. and the recipes were good.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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