Tiassa (Vlad Taltos Series #13) [NOOK Book]

Overview


Long ago, one of the gods fashioned an artifact called the silver tiassa. To Devera the Wanderer, it's a pretty toy to play with. To Vlad Taltos, it's a handy prop for a con he's running. To the Empire, it's a tool to be used against their greatest enemies—the Jenoine. To the Jhereg, it's a trap to kill Vlad.

The silver tiassa, however, had its own agenda.

Steven Brust's Tiassa tells a story that threads its way through more than ten years of ...

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Tiassa (Vlad Taltos Series #13)

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Overview


Long ago, one of the gods fashioned an artifact called the silver tiassa. To Devera the Wanderer, it's a pretty toy to play with. To Vlad Taltos, it's a handy prop for a con he's running. To the Empire, it's a tool to be used against their greatest enemies—the Jenoine. To the Jhereg, it's a trap to kill Vlad.

The silver tiassa, however, had its own agenda.

Steven Brust's Tiassa tells a story that threads its way through more than ten years of the remarkable life of Vlad Taltos—and, to the delight of longtime fans, brings him together with Khaavren, from The Phoenix Guards and its sequels. Khaavren may be Vlad’s best friend—or his most terrible enemy.

At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The 18th novel (after 2010's Iorich) in Brust's sprawling Dragaera fantasy series is a wonderful return to form, setting assassin hero Vlad Taltos in a contest of wits and wills against imperial guard captain Khaavren, the formidable protagonist of 1992's The Phoenix Guards. On the run from his former employers, the Jhereg, Vlad swings back into town for a surreptitious visit to his family and finds himself wanted all over again by Khaavren, who is chasing a magical silver statue of a tiassa. A cat-and-mouse game ensues, full of plots, counterplots, unlikely disguises, swordfights, and mistaken identities. Fans will love the full cast of favorite characters and the resolution of longstanding plots and mysteries, and like most of Brust's books, this witty, wry tale stands well alone and is very accessible to new readers. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
“A wonderful return to form... Full of plots, counterplots, unlikely disguises, sword fights, and mistaken identities. Fans will love the full cast of favorite characters and the resolution of longstanding plots and mysteries, and like most of Brust's books, this witty, wry tale stands well alone and is very accessible to new readers."

—Publishers Weekly

“Steven Brust may well be America’s best fantasy writer.”

—Tad Williams

“No mere plot summary can describe accurately the fun and adventure that naturally seem to follow Vlad Taltos.”

VOYA

“Brust is incapable of writing a dull book.”

—Booklist

Library Journal
Formerly a highly skilled assassin and racketeer for House Jhereg, the long-lived Vlad Taltos (Iorich), changed by circumstances, now flees the House he once served and immerses himself in the political and social machinations of the noble and powerful. When he comes across an artifact, a silver figurine known as a tiassa, the delicate object will play a significant part in his life—as the center for an elaborate sting operation, a tool for the Empire to use against its enemies, and as a lure to trap Taltos. The dialog-driven story features witty conversational exchanges that push Brust's plot to its usually surprising conclusion. VERDICT Series fans will anticipate this new chapter in Taltos's life, and new readers may want more.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429991742
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 3/29/2011
  • Series: Vlad Taltos Series , #13
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 91,999
  • File size: 328 KB

Meet the Author


STEVEN BRUST is the author of Dragon, Issola, Jhegaala, and the New York Times-bestselling Dzur, among many other popular fantasy novels. A native of Minneapolis, he currently lives in Texas.

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Read an Excerpt



 
The first time I saw the tiassa was nine Real Years before I was born. Mafenyi was holding it, and it was so pretty! When I saw it again, two hundred Real Years earlier, I had to take it so I did.
I didn’t think Mafenyi would mind too much. She hadn’t made it to keep. She told me that she made it because she had to, but it shouldn’t ever stay with anyone for too long. She used silver that came all the way from Aelma, which is a city on the Chareq River near some mountains called Daeld, which is where the silver was found in the ground.
Mafenyi said she melted the silver in a cauldron made of light, and she cut off her hand and put it in the cauldron, and plucked out one of her eyes and put that in, too, and then shaped it while it was still hotter than hot. She worked on it for years and years, so the ears would be so perfect, and you could see candlelight through the wings; she put tiny sapphires in for the eyes. I asked her how come she still had both hands and both eyes, and she said she was a Goddess and so she grew them back. She said I could be a Goddess if I wanted to be, and I said my grandmother was a Goddess and it didn’t seem like much fun.
When we were done talking I went away, but then I came back. I wanted to just look at it some more, but she was sleeping, and that’s when I knew I had to have it, so I took it from her shelf.
It wasn’t big, but it was so heavy I had to hold it in both hands. I went back home and just held it and looked at it, but I got fingerprints on it so I cleaned it off, and then wrapped it in cloth. I kept it in the cloth after that except when I wanted to look at it.
There was a woman named Chuvin. She was an Athyra, and she was very nice. I thought she should have the tiassa, so I left it in her house, then I went off to see a new world being made, which was very exciting.
When I got back, I went to look at the silver tiassa, but Chuvin didn’t have it anymore. She had made some very pretty psiprints, though, and I got to see them. She gave me one of Yevetna Falls that’s so good you can almost get wet looking at it. Mommy said that first, but I think it’s funny and true, so I’m saying it now. I asked Chuvin what she did with the tiassa, but she said she didn’t know, it just got lost somehow.
It wasn’t hard to find it, though. When you looked in what the Necromancer calls the other place, it was like a big white light, with two blinking blue thingies. I saw it right away, and followed it because I wanted to know where it was, and really I just wanted to see it again. It isn’t hard to follow something in the other place, but it’s hard to talk about. It’s like painting when you don’t have paint, or singing when there’s no song, or talking when there are no words. I can’t explain. Anyway, I followed it.
It was an old man who had it. He was a Lyorn and his name was Pindua. He made statues from big pieces of marble. I got to hold the tiassa for a little while, but then I left it with him. He made one called “Worill Reclining on Stairway” that they put in the Hall of Monuments in the Imperial Palace.
A little while after he made it he died and they brought him to the Paths of the Dead. He owed a lot of money when he died, and when that happens they sell all your things to try to pay the people you owe money to, so the tiassa was sold to a man named Paarfi who was a Hawk and who wrote books.
I didn’t think about it for a long time, but then I remembered it one day a year later, which was almost three hundred Real Years later. I looked for it, and Paarfi still had it. I went to talk to him about it. He talked about what he was writing. He was a nice man.
I told him he should give the tiassa away, and he agreed, but said he wanted to keep it a little longer, until he finished his new book. I said that was okay, and he gave me one of his books and signed it for me. He wrote, “To Devera, a very special little girl.” I took it to Grandma’s and put it in the chest with my things, next to the seashell that whistles “March to the Kaanas” and the psiprint of Yevetna Falls and the tick-ticker and some other stuff I want to keep.
While I was there, Grandma asked me what I was doing, and I said I was looking for the silver tiassa and she asked what that was so I explained where it came from. She asked some questions about it, but she had the look she gets when she’s being nice and doesn’t really care about what you’re telling her, so pretty soon I said good-bye and ran off.
I went to a place called Tanvir where it was just spring and there were flowers in all the colors there are. After that, I went to an empty tower in a dead city and a man made of metal played music for me. After a while, I started wanting to see the tiassa again, so I went back to fifty Real Years later, and Paarfi still had it. I thought it was long enough, so I took it but left him a note, then I went to Adrilankha ten Real Years ahead and played with Vlad Norathar. I showed him how to look in the other place, and he showed me how to make a spinnystick with glitters.
Then I was tired from all the jumping around so I put my spinnystick in the chest and took a nap. Mommy says naps are good for you, but I only take them when I’m sleepy. When I woke up again I found Daddy and showed him the tiassa and he said it was very pretty. I asked if he was ever going to come visit me and Mommy and he said he would soon because he wanted his sword back. He looked angry when he said it so I didn’t ask about it any more. While I was there Mafenyi came up and said I shouldn’t have stolen the tiassa and had to give it back and Daddy told her not to accuse me of stealing but I said I had just borrowed it to give to some people who needed it. They started arguing with each other so I left and took the tiassa with me.
I started to Mommy’s but then a while later I looked in the other place, and saw Mafenyi was coming after me. I hadn’t thought she wanted the tiassa that much. I thought about jumping, but then I could never come back to now. I didn’t want to go to Grandma’s, because then she would fight Mafenyi and I’d feel bad, and if I went to Mommy’s I’d have to explain what I did.
So please, Uncle Vlad. She’ll be here soon. Can you take it?

 
Copyright © 2011 by Steven Brust
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 47 )
Rating Distribution

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(18)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 48 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 12, 2011

    Very disappointing.

    I wasted enough time reading this book, but I had to give a warning to prospective readers. Don't bother, it doesn't move the story forward, it doesn't present a story in and of itself. This book is obviously just something that was knocked out quickly in an attempt to be clever and make some quick cash for the author.

    If you must read it, get it at the library, or borrow it from some poor sucker that already bought it, personally, I wish I could get my money back.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2011

    Disappointing

    I read Steven Brust avidly, In the dozen or so books in the Vlad series plus the Khaavren Romances; The Phoenix Guards, Five Hundred Years After,
    The Paths of the Dead, The Lord of Castle Black and Sethra Lavode. I have rarely missed picking one up within days of publishing.

    This is the first time I truly wish I could get my money back. This story seems to be a a loose collection of short stories, loosely related. The final section leaves you scratching your head, completely unsatisfied as you feel like it ended in the middle of the story.

    Shame on you, Mr. Brust, and shame on your publisher for putting such a poor example of your wonderful skills on the shelves.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 28, 2011

    A bit of let down

    Unfortunately to me this is the weakest book in the whole Vlad series:(
    The whole book felt like several short stories poorly tied together - practically no connection to the story line in Iorich which I guess is what I really hoped for.... Overall its worth reading as a part of an excellent series as it does add small touches to the overall story but I could not recommend it on its own strengths...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    Awesome

    This book is essentially a series of short stories that involve one object. This novel also reveals some mysteries that have been swirling about the series for some time.

    Take your time and re-read the entire series before reading this book and this novel be much more enjoyable. That includes the side stories set in this universe.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 17, 2011

    I do not recommend the 13th book unless you just have to have the set

    I will start by saying that I have read all the Vlad and the The Khaavren Romances, I love reading this Author. But this 13th book is a disappointment. The story line did not carry on from book 12, and more to the point it felt like it had been hastily thrown together as a bunch of short with a weak connection around the Silver Tiassa. Even the writing style switched between that of a Vlad story and that used in Phoenix Guard.
    For me it was not worth the price and instead of tying up loose ends it just created more, like who and what was the strange Visitor that Sethra introduced at the beginning to Vlad. and what did it have to do with the rest of the book, nothing.
    Sorry Mr Brust, not you best effort.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2011

    Not Brust's best work

    A disappointing work that lacks continuity, resolution and focus.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 15, 2012

    Taltos is extra yummy goodness every time.

    As the taltos series has matured, and now that vlad is effectively immortal if he plays it fairly safe, it has been a lovely read across all the books.

    I have been a huge fan of Brust since the first thing I read, and so far he has never failed to entertain.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 29, 2012

    Tiassa is excellent

    This is another of Brust's intriguing, non-linear series and belongs with the rest.

    Don S.

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  • Posted April 5, 2011

    Brust is back on track

    Tiassa is a return to form for Steven Brust in several ways: not only is it an interwoven tale of Vlad and Khaavren of the Phoenix Guards, but it's also a return (in parts) to the young Vlad. The different threads of the narrative touch on almost every character in the series, including a certain little girl who may or may not exist, but can trip through time.

    My only complaint is that it's just too short; I always want more. Very highly recommended.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted August 1, 2011

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    Posted November 9, 2011

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    Posted August 27, 2011

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    Posted July 15, 2011

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