Tibetan Cooking: Recipes for Daily Living, Celebration, and Ceremony

Overview

There is no better way to experience the flavor of an exotic culture than through its food—and no better guide to the recipes and gustatory culture of Tibet than Elizabeth Kelly, long-time cook for lamas and other Tibetans. Her remarkable array of easy-to-follow recipes use ingredients readily available in the West. You will find serving suggestions, meal planning, traditional foods, and numerous vegetarian dishes: everything needed to make a complete Tibetan dinner or just to try something different. Tibetan ...
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Tibetan Cooking: Recipes for Daily Living, Celebration, and Ceremony (PagePerfect NOOK Book)

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Overview

There is no better way to experience the flavor of an exotic culture than through its food—and no better guide to the recipes and gustatory culture of Tibet than Elizabeth Kelly, long-time cook for lamas and other Tibetans. Her remarkable array of easy-to-follow recipes use ingredients readily available in the West. You will find serving suggestions, meal planning, traditional foods, and numerous vegetarian dishes: everything needed to make a complete Tibetan dinner or just to try something different. Tibetan Cooking: Recipes for Daily Living, Celebration, and Ceremony also offers a personal look into the little known aspects of Tibetan cuisine: its adaptation to modern times and its preservation and connection with Tibetan holidays and religious ceremonies. Beautifully illustrated and well designed as a gift or for everyday practical use, this book is a gem.
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Editorial Reviews

Culinaria Libris
The recipes in this book show how Tibetan food is sustenance for survival, but the author's stories tell how Tibetan food is a metaphor for nourishment of the body, soul and mind. Following the recipes is probably the most interesting part of the book - the culture of Tibet including instructions on how to serve a lama. This means if the Dalai Lama should stop in for tea, you can be ready
From the Publisher
"My old friend Elizabeth knows the fine art of putting love into every aspect of home and hearth through her being as well as cooking, and shows us how to do so too. These Tibetan recipes can nourish the soul as well as the body and help us turn home into temple and table into altar." —Lama Surya Das, author of Awakening the Buddha Within and Buddha Is As Buddha Does

"I have known Elizabeth Kelly for nearly thirty years. She was our first cook at Karma Triyana Dharmachakra. . . . Over the years Elizabeth has learned to cook all kinds of Tibetan dishes and also for Losar (Tibetan New Year). Our family has enjoyed many delicious meals at her home. I am very happy that Tibetan Cooking has been written. During my travels people are asking me how to make Tibetan tea, mo mos, and other dishes. Now I can suggest this book!" —Ven. Bardor Tulku Rinpoche

"An ancient master once said, 'Food is the dharma and the dharma is food.' Elizabeth Kelly has certainly served up a dharma meal in this book. Well crafted yet direct and to the point, it's sure to be a valuable addition to the cookbook shelf of any kitchen." —John Daido Loori, abbot, Zen Mountain Monastery

"Not only are these ordinary and extraordinary recipes for traditional Tibetan cooking marvelous (I've tried many of them) but Elizabeth Kelly's good comments both practical and spiritual make this book a true culinary jewel." —Gioia Timpanelli, author of Sometimes the Soul

"Elizabeth Kelly's Tibetan Cookbook is a feast for the eye and palate. She makes accessible a realm of cooking that is often considered exotic. If we are what we eat, then more Dharma practitioners might consider utilizing the recipes in this book to truly immerse themselves in the Tibetan culture." —Rev. Betsy Stang, Wittenberg Center for Alternative Resources

"The first book of Tibetan cuisine to offer a range of dishes, from traditional home cooking to celebratory recipes for religious ceremonies. From a Jalapeño and Blue Cheese condiment dish to easy Egg Soup and Steamed Greens, dishes are accompanied by discussions of Tibetan culture and ceremonies." —The Bookwatch

"Of the books we receive for review, few have proved as useful as Elizabeth Esther Kelly's Tibetan Cooking. . . . She uses her experience and extensive working knowledge of Tibetan cuisine to craft a book that is both easy to use and rich with context . . . provides a nice selection of color photos." —Ashe Journal

"Such a book is in great need . . . a wonderful contribution towards popularizing and teaching Tibetan recipes." —The Tibet Journal

"While filled with simply prepared recipes including both meat- and vegetarian-based dishes, Tibetan Cooking is more than just a cookbook. Kelly includes background information on preparing food for offerings (pujas), creating a shrine, observing customs and etiquette, and even serving a lama. There is also a section dedicated to what to serve during Losar (Tibetan New Year). This is a good introduction to Tibetan cuisine culture and customs." —Turning Wheel

"This is not only a beautiful and unique cookbook. It is also a gateway to Tibet through the stomach." —John H. Mann, director, Divine Androgyny Institute

"The recipes in this book show how Tibetan food is sustenance for survival, but the author's stories tell how Tibetan food is a metaphor for nourishment of the body, soul, and mind. Following the recipes is probably the most interesting part of the book—the culture of Tibet, including instructions on how to serve a lama. This means if the Dalai Lama should stop in for tea, you can be ready." —Culinaria Libris 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781559392624
  • Publisher: Shambhala Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/31/2007
  • Pages: 152
  • Sales rank: 1,454,574
  • Product dimensions: 8.02 (w) x 8.94 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Esther Kelly, a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism for thirty years, was the first cook at Karma Triyana Dharmachakra (the North American seat of His Holiness the Seventeenth Karmapa) in upstate New York. She is a published illustrator, painter, and restorer.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Great Introduction and Education with Accessible Recipes

    Do you wonder when considering recipes from new cultures what caused the unfamiliar combinations? Or why in the world did that technique develop? While few people are interested in becoming food anthropologists, most styles of cooking are directly influenced by environment and belief systems. “Tibetan Cooking” by Elizabeth Esther Kelly takes you inside the experience of food in Tibet. The book does a great job of setting the recipes in the lifestyle of the area. The layout and style of the book is equally satisfying. For those of you, like me, who love to read cookbooks, this is a great find. The combination of interesting educational materials, recipes that range from easy to make right now to more daring, and the visual appeal make for a great kitchen read. If I have a criticism of the book, it’s the small number of recipes presented. The downside is the reality of putting together a cooking missive that is as much about education and culture as about the food. For those looking to load up on interesting recipes, I’d recommend “The Nepal Cookbook” instead. So it really depends on your goal in acquiring a new book about food and recipes from this area. Choosing a favorite recipe, on the other hand, was simple. The techniques are simple and you probably only need to get a couple extra items—though I believe most cooks who will pick up this book likely have turmeric in their spice collection. The four plum tomatoes make need a grocery stop. Otherwise, this satisfying, beautiful dish is likely to become a regular star in your kitchen.

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