Tiger on a Tree by Anushka Ravishankar, Pulak Biswas |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Tiger on a Tree
  • Alternative view 1 of Tiger on a Tree
  • Alternative view 2 of Tiger on a Tree

Tiger on a Tree

by Anushka Ravishankar, Pulak Biswas
     
 

Catch this tiger

As he wanders from shore to field, a scaredy-cat tiger suddenly finds himself up a tree. "Get him! Net him! Tie him tight!" the local villagers say. But once they capture him, the villagers make a surprising decision about what to do with him - and soon the tiger is off and running again.

Young readers can follow this simple, spunky

Overview

Catch this tiger

As he wanders from shore to field, a scaredy-cat tiger suddenly finds himself up a tree. "Get him! Net him! Tie him tight!" the local villagers say. But once they capture him, the villagers make a surprising decision about what to do with him - and soon the tiger is off and running again.

Young readers can follow this simple, spunky adventure through vivacious verse, glowing orange-and-black pictures, and typography that soars right along with the tiger and his pursuers.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Perfect for reading aloud with young preschoolers...The comedic drama blends smoothly with the conservation message in deliciously scary sound words and pictures that will make this a favorite for sharing again and again." — Booklist

"Ravishankar is well-known in India for her Indian English nonsense verse and Biswas is one of the country's premier children's book illustrators; cheers to the publisher for bringing them to these shores." — Kirkus Reviews

"Appealing illustrations...The simple text curves playfully across the pages, adding to the sense of motion in the artwork." — School Library Journal

"Rare and welcome...Pulak Biswas's two-color art is as bold and evocative as that of Glen Rounds." — The Horn Book

Publishers Weekly
Three strong colors-inky black, tangerine orange and the white of the page-lend a homemade batik look to this rhyming tiger tale, originally published in India. Repeated "tiger, tiger" phrases allude to William Blake's famous poem, "The Tyger," although this striped cat looks more fearful than he turns out to be. The story opens on a riverbank: "Tiger, tiger on the shore./ Does he want to go across?/ Make a dash?/ Be bold? Be rash?/ Splash!" On the other side, the tiger encounters a goat (represented as a black silhouette), and his nonplussed frown reveals an unpredatory nervousness. When the goat takes the offensive, the furry fellow climbs the nearest tree, where some startled men spot him. "Will he bite? He might!" they cry. They gather an orange net, form a ring around the tree and snare the tiger: "He's caught./ He's got./ Now what?" they shrug, before voting on whether to release him. The circular tale ends with the tiger back on his side of the river (and a reprise of "Tiger, tiger on the shore"). Biswas pictures the men in white sarongs. His rough black-on-white drawings suggest lithographs or ancient Greek urns, and the terra cotta highlights emphasize the allusion to handmade pottery. Ravishankar, a writer of nonsense poetry, composes rhymes with eccentric rhythms and emphatic punctuation marks; the villagers unanimously decide to free the tiger, suggesting that a tense situation can have a peaceful outcome for all. Ravishankar's light verse and Biswas's craft aesthetic lend this amiable book a pleasing simplicity. Ages 3-6. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
India's Tara Publishing is becoming known for breaking away from an otherwise didactic children's publishing scene by producing books that exemplify remarkable combinations of tradition and innovation. Tiger on a Tree is no exception. This American reprint is a handsome one. It manages to preserve some of the look and feel of the Tara original, despite having to sacrifice the handcrafted endpapers in order to meet American archival standards. The storyline is charmingly simple. A scaredy-cat tiger gets caught—then what? As the jacket copy says, "Did he cry? Did he plead? If you want to know, READ!" Ravishankar's pacing is flawless, her rhymes contagious. She uses punctuation to enhance meaning in a manner rarely seen in books for very young readers. The "dum duma dum dum" of the drums is at once universally appealing and thoroughly grounded in the onomatopeia of baby talk in more than one Indian language. Pulak Biswas's vivid art merges with text that flows in waves across the page, both leading the story and challenging young readers to decode the left-to-right sequence of the words. The artwork is an engaging demonstration of what can be accomplished with only two colors and an assured mastery of space on the page. Text and image are seamlessly integrated into a container for visual poetry. Young readers and listeners are likely to demand repeated readings, and will discover additional delightful layers of meaning each time. This one is a keeper. 2004, Farrar Straus Giroux, Ages 3 to 6.
—Uma Krishnaswami
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A curious tiger swims across a river and roams the forest looking for adventure. Frightened by the cry of a small animal, he climbs a tree. A group of dhoti-garbed village men discovers him and decides to capture him. After placing a large net around the tree, they blow horns and bang drums to create a racket, eventually scaring the creature down. Now the men have a problem: What should they do with the animal? "Send him to the zoo?/Stick him up with glue?/Paint him an electric blue?" Finally, they decide to set him free. The appealing illustrations are naive, childlike, and dramatic. Biswas uses a limited palette of black, white, and orange to create vivid scenes. The faces of the human characters are filled with personality and expression, while the tiger's emotions are conveyed through his body language and eyes. The simple text curves playfully across the pages, adding to the sense of motion in the artwork. This tale from India can be paired with Helen Bannerman's The Story of Little Babaji (HarperCollins, 1996) for an enjoyable storytime.-Linda Staskus, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A nonsense import from India tells the story of an endearingly timid tiger. Minimalist verse follows the little fellow as he intrepidly crosses a stream and then encounters a terrifying goat: "Baaaaaaaa," says the goat, and "Yaaaaaaaah!" shrieks the tiger, who flees up a tree. A group of dhoti-clad men trap the tiger, debate what to do with him-"Send him to the zoo? Stick him up with glue? Paint him an electric blue?"-and, of course, eventually set him free. Thick, creamy stock supports the equally minimalist two-color illustrations (black and orange, natch), which depict a blobby little tiger with wide, distressed eyes and men of a variety of ages and body types (pot-bellies are prominent). The typography swoops and darts across the page, lending extra energy to the illustrations. The tale ends as it begins, with the "Tiger, tiger on the shore," happily returning home. Ravishankar is well-known in India for her Indian English nonsense verse and Biswas is one of the country's premier children's book illustrators; cheers to the publisher for bringing them to these shores. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374375553
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
03/05/2004
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
7.57(w) x 9.75(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Anushka Ravishankar has published more than ten books in India, including several collections of nonsense verse. She lives in Chennai, India.

Pulak Biswas lives in Delhi, India, and is one of his country's best-known children's book illustrators and authors.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >