Tikvah: Children's Book Creators Reflect on Human Rights

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In this thoughtful and diverse collection, more than forty of America's most distinguished children's book creators, including fourteen Caldecott Medalists and Honor artists, share their reflections on human rights. Through words and pictures, they examine past, present, and future to foster a kinder, more tolerant world.

Some of these artists share compelling memories and insights: William Joyce recalls being a teenager in newly integrated Louisiana; Tomie dePaola remembers ...

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Overview

In this thoughtful and diverse collection, more than forty of America's most distinguished children's book creators, including fourteen Caldecott Medalists and Honor artists, share their reflections on human rights. Through words and pictures, they examine past, present, and future to foster a kinder, more tolerant world.

Some of these artists share compelling memories and insights: William Joyce recalls being a teenager in newly integrated Louisiana; Tomie dePaola remembers what it was like to be an unusual child; and Anita Lobel vividly describes a dangerous encounter with German soldiers during the Holocaust.

Other contributors encourage us to take action against the problems of today's world. Lillian Hoban cries out against child labor, while Michael Hague paints a reminder that many still live with the terror of war. Still others look to the future: Eric Carle sees the Biblical lion and lamb living side by side, and Ed Young prays for reciprocity between generations.

Whether joyous or provocative, stark or encouraging, the work collected in Tikvah represents these artists' firm commitment to human rights. This unique volume is a gift of hope.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Originally published in a limited edition in 2001 by the University of Connecticut, this handsomely produced volume affords 45 children's author/illustrators the opportunity to reflect on various aspects of human rights. Each contributor receives a spread, with one page for text and the facing page for art. Despite the book's title (the Hebrew word for "hope") the entries frequently strike notes of caution and even outrage. Some employ vague or general terms, but most focus on specific issues or injustices. Normand L. Chartier and Ruth Sanderson condemn abortion; Lillian Hoban, Marianna Mayer and Jeanette Winter decry child labor practices; William Joyce describes joining the first integrated class at his Louisiana middle school; Betsy and Giulio Maestro discuss the importance of teaching tolerance to ensure religious freedom; Anita Lobel, in an excerpt from No Pretty Pictures, underscores the horror of the Holocaust; and Gloria Jean and Jerry Pinkney crusade against childhood hunger. The illustrations range in tone from comforting (Emily Arnold McCully depicts a child, a towhead in overalls, watching the autumn leaves fall) to the unsettling (Trina Schart Hyman paints a woman whose breasts have been cut away at the hands of two "doctors" representing Patriarchy and Technology: "They have poisoned her with their chemicals, so her hair is gone and her mind and eyes are dead"). Adult rather than young fans of the contributors will be the likeliest audience. Ages 14-up. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
In this collection, forty-three contemporary children's book artists, including Natalie Babbit, Tom Feelings and Ed Young, reflect on human rights in words and pictures. Originally published as a limited edition by the University of Connecticut, the text is now available for a general audience. The title, Tikvah is the Hebrew word for hope, and in his introduction Elie Wiesel explains, "Tikvah means hope and hope is represented by children." While the anthology centers around human rights, presumably children's, the topics represented are broad and range from concerns about the environment to reflections on doctor-assisted suicide. The wide variety of topics and approaches to the topics of human rights reflects the underlying assumption of the project, that freedom of expression is "a critical element of human rights." The collection includes two anti-abortion entries, by Normand Chartier and Ruth Sanderson, which seem out of place in a book that purports to be about human rights, especially given the types of violence perpetrated in the name of protecting unborn fetuses. Tikvah is intended for an adult audience, and those interested in the politics of individual artists would find the collection interesting. Part of the royalties from this book will be donated to Oxfam America, a nonprofit humanitarian organization. 2001, North-South Books/SeaStar, $19.95. Ages Adult. Reviewer: Elizabeth Marshall
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-This handsome volume, in which 45 American contemporary children's book illustrators reflect, in words and pictures, on their understanding and their commitment to human rights, demonstrates that the concept is a slippery one. The work was originally published in 2001 as a limited edition to accompany the dedication of the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut in Storrs. It is now being reissued for a larger audience. The illustrations were made by the artists for the project and the short accompanying texts are, for the most part, original. Tikvah is the Hebrew word for hope, which is in short supply as these artists see their world. Beginning alphabetically with Natalie Babbitt, whose balanced scales of justice depict things not as they are but "the way I have always thought they ought to be," and concluding with Ed Young's observation that "In human affairs, `balance' is crucial," the contributors weigh in heavily on the side of global problems. Pieces touch on war, environmental degradation, abortion, bullying, racial prejudice, child labor, the invisible poor, lack of education, murder, child abuse, euthanasia, and denial of freedom of speech. Only occasionally do they describe moments of joy, basic freedoms, love of the natural world, dreams, hopes, and human dignity. The overall effect is a sobering reminder that however we may define the phrase, for many in the world, human rights are still a distant goal.-Kathleen Isaacs, Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587170973
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC
  • Publication date: 9/28/2001
  • Pages: 128
  • Age range: 14 - 18 Years
  • Product dimensions: 1.00 (w) x 1.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword iii
Introduction vii
Tikvah 1
Biographies 89
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