'Til The Streetlights Came On: Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games [NOOK Book]

Overview

'Til The Streetlights Came On - Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games

We?ve become a nation of people who don?t work and play particularly well with others. It?s true. News accounts decry the problem daily with stories about workplace violence, harassment and road rage, to updates on skyrocketing levels of childhood obesity, concerns over the sedentary lifestyles of teens, and the newly coined ?Brittle Child Syndrome? which tells of our nation?s youth and their inability to cope with the vicissitudes of adult ...
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'Til The Streetlights Came On: Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games

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Overview

'Til The Streetlights Came On - Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games

We’ve become a nation of people who don’t work and play particularly well with others. It’s true. News accounts decry the problem daily with stories about workplace violence, harassment and road rage, to updates on skyrocketing levels of childhood obesity, concerns over the sedentary lifestyles of teens, and the newly coined “Brittle Child Syndrome” which tells of our nation’s youth and their inability to cope with the vicissitudes of adult life. This much is clear, when it comes to giving our all and getting along – we’ve lost a step or two in our culture.

It’s time to get those steps back by revisiting the immutable truths contained in 'Til The Streetlights Came On - Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games

The sandlot – at one time literally a vacant lot among city buildings on whose ground youth etched out a ball field and immortality – now stands euphemistically to characterize our experiences playing neighborhood games. For a select few, the sandlot was an incubator of their future athletic prowess. For most of us though, it was the classroom where we learned the life skills that shaped our view of ourselves and conditioned us to make contributions in our adult life. We learned to participate, to contribute, to innovate, to negotiate, to visioneer, to persevere, and to leave a legacy. We learned these lessons experientially, from peer-to-peer interactions and not from a politically correct script read in controlled environments.

One of the most culturally significant developments over the last twenty five years has been the reduction, if not elimination, of the hallowed grounds of the neighborhood games. Not since before the industrial revolution and child labor laws first liberated American youth, have our city, suburban and even country roads been so devoid of children at play. The once common sound of a screen door spring stretching open, calling kids to play, has been replaced by the eerily cold sound of a dead bolt slipping into place. As significant as the reduction in physical activity is, the lesser identified loss is the loss of the interpersonal skills we gained from learning how to get along . . . so the game could go on!

Part generational memoir, part business book and part self-help manual, 'Til The Streetlights Came On - Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games will take tens of millions of Americans back to a time of stick ball, Johnny-on-the-Pony, Four-Square, “I Call!” and “Ali-Ali-In-Free”, as it teaches a new generation that Kick-the-Can does not mean someone passed away. Universally accessible memories, anecdotes and legends will have the readership reveling in the simple and profound meaning of unstructured, unsupervised - play. Each of the seven laws is presented as a series of the timelessly relevant mores which governed the lives of a nation of youth at play. The book connects to modern day life by ending each law with a series of actionable items that can impact an individual, a business and a community.

So grab your skate key, your ball glove, your Chinese jump rope or the nearest Frisbee and let’s reacquaint ourselves with, as Terrance Mann said of it, “all that was good once and can be again.” It’s all waiting inside 'Til The Streetlights Came On - Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940014569699
  • Publisher: Publish Green
  • Publication date: 4/27/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Daniel J. Porter is the author of 22 books, including three national children's best sellers. Daniel broke into publishing as the author of Precious Moments prayer books, and expanded his career writing on faith and character themes for adults and children. Daniel's lifelong journey to overcome the ravaging effects of Dystonia makes him a sought after motivatonal speaker and inspired him to share the insights he gained along his journey.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 3, 2012

    Very Highly Recommended

    I read this during an afternoon when I took my daughter to our small town's pool while surrounded by hundreds of screaming kids. Daniel J. Porter transported me to my own childhood, a time when we lived for our Neighborhood Games. He could very well have been writing about OUR time growing up, playing hard, making our own rules, arguing and resolving conflicts. Or stated differently...making dear Friends and learning life lessons.

    It is precisely the reason this book is uniquely important and so very timely...he could very well have been writing about anyone who grew up during a time and place of Neighborhood Games. I believe he has identified the defining difference between current and past generations, and all parents today should create these forgotten opportunities for our own children.

    I laughed until I cried, and even cried until I laughed at such fond memories. And I just might have found what's been missing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 13, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Alice DiNizo for Readers' Favorite Daniel J. Porter

    Reviewed by Alice DiNizo for Readers' Favorite

    Daniel J. Porter is the author of twenty-two books for children and now he has put his pen to a book that no reader should skip. In "'Til the Street Lights Come On: Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games", Porter tells of a time when children didn't have scheduled play dates or planned activities but played games of all sorts with the other children in their neighborhood. And, in playing those street-version games of soccer, basketball, baseball, football, and whatever came to mind, the author reminds the reader that children inspired, mentored, celebrated and tolerated each other. Accepting each other's differences and teaching each child not to be self-conscious of limitations was the norm in those neighborhood games. Every child living in a neighborhood was expected to be out and about, not hiding away and ashamed of limitations. Porter tells that he was born with dystonia, the nation's most common muscle movement disorder, but with the lessons he learned from neighborhood games, he has gone on to not just being a published author but a speaker as well. On page 4 of "'Til the Street Lights Come On", Daniel Porter tells the reader that "I think we lost something when outdoor neighborhood play disappeared."

    "'Til the Streetlights Come On: Lessons Learned from Neighborhood Games" is a highly well-written and totally welcome addition to book shelves everywhere. That Daniel Porter didn't walk well until he was three, didn't master riding a bike until he was ten, and had trouble speaking aloud in class are dystonia disabilities that he was able to overcome through the lessons he learned from participating in neighborhood games. With black and white photographs taken by his wife, with short poems called Sand Scripts placed at each chapter's end, Daniel Porter has created a masterpiece, a testimonial to what was and should be brought back: neighborhood children playing naturally with each other, with no soccer moms or dads in sight.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 12, 2013

    ¿Til the Streetlights Came On ¿ Review by Martha A. Cheves, Auth

    ‘Til the Streetlights Came On – Review by Martha A. Cheves, Author of Stir, Laugh, Repeat; Think With Your Taste Buds; A Book and A Dish

    6:30 a.m.: The thud of the paper on the front porch – two hours until ‘game time.’ (It took until 8:30 for the morning commute traffic to clear our streets, which would then remain virtually car-free until 4:30 that afternoon.)7:00 a.m.: The gurgle of your family’s coffee pot churning out its black gold – ninety minutes until game time.7:30 a.m.: The roar of Mr. Pruschetti’s Plymouth wagon… T-Minus sixty minutes and counting.

    Cued by this melliferous morning melee, we headed down for a bowl of frosted something-or-others and listened for a signal from which we drew further indications of what the day held in store. Our communication network was closer to the beating of tribal drums than today’s web of technology. We moved to the sounds of our world with sublime synchronicity. Noises that seemed inconsequential to others were Morse code to our awaiting ears. We simply listened to the world around us – and we knew what to do.

    Now those were the days! If you were a kid growing up from the 1950s to the 1980s, you can very possibly relate to this. This was the time when we had no cell phones, no texting, and no computer games. This was the time when we actually ‘played.’ There were organized sports for those lucky enough to live in an area that offered them or if you family could afford to pay for you to participate but for those who couldn’t, your games were organized by those who played. Sometimes it even became the one who had the ball or bat or glove. As to where you played, a lot of times it was in the road or if you were lucky, the vacant lot. Those were the days of not only having real, honest fun but also the days of self teaching and learning lessons that would follow you through the rest of your life.
    As Author Daniel J. Porter spreads out his childhood stories, I can’t help but think about the kids of today. As we expand more and more each day into the computer world I can’t help but feel that today’s kids are missing out on so much. Other than technology, what are today’s kids learning? Can a computer game teach them team work? Can a computer game teach them respect for others? Can a computer game teach them to share? Sadly I fell the answer to these questions have to be answered with a no. Yes there are organized sports and events that kids can participate in but the accomplishment of organizing, bring the players together, setting up the rules of fairness and most of all, making those friendships and memories that will last a lifetime can’t be found in a computer game.
    As I read ‘Til the Streetlights Came On I took a wonderful walk down memory lane. It also made me feel sorry for the kids of today. They are missing out on so much. Maybe, just maybe, this book will help wake us up and get the kids outside where the real fun begins. It’s a book I recommend be read, especially by young parents.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2013

    Elder's Den

    Elder's Den

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