Tim Gunn's Fashion Bible: The Fascinating History of Everything in Your Closet

( 15 )

Overview

In the beginning there was the fig leaf...

and the toga. Crinolines and ruffs. Chain mailand corsets. What do these antiquated items have to do with the oh-so-twenty-first-century skinny jeans, graphic tee, and sexy pumps you slipped into this morning? Everything! Fashion begets fashion, and life?from economics to politics, weather to warfare, practicality to the utterly impractical?is reflected in the styles of any given era, evolving into the...

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Tim Gunn's Fashion Bible: The Fascinating History of Everything in Your Closet

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Overview

In the beginning there was the fig leaf...

and the toga. Crinolines and ruffs. Chain mailand corsets. What do these antiquated items have to do with the oh-so-twenty-first-century skinny jeans, graphic tee, and sexy pumps you slipped into this morning? Everything! Fashion begets fashion, and life—from economics to politics, weather to warfare, practicality to the utterly impractical—is reflected in the styles of any given era, evolving into the threads you buy and wear today.

With the candidness, intelligence, and charm that made him a household name on Project Runway, Tim Gunn reveals the fascinating story behind each article of clothing dating back to ancient times, in a book that reads like a walking tour from museum to closet with Tim at your side. From Cleopatra’s crown to Helen of Troy’s sandals, from Queen Victoria’s corset to Madonna’s cone bra, Dynasty’s power suits to Hillary Clinton’s pantsuits, Tim Gunn’s Fashion Bible takes you on a runway-ready journey through the highs and lows of fashion history.

Drawing from his exhaustive knowledge and intensive research to offer cutting-edge insights into modern style, Tim explains how the 1960s ruined American underwear, how Beau Brummell created the look men have worn for more than a century, why cargo capri pants are a plague on our nation, and much more. He will make you see your wardrobe in a whole new way. Prepare to be inspired as you change your thinking about the past, present, and future of fashion!

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Project Runway fashion guru Tim Gunn knows how to make it work, but he also knows how innovative Western designers have re-imagined and recreated every form of apparel and clothing accessory. His new hardcover sets out to show runway watchers in typically crisp, sprightly Gunn style that fascinating fashion didn't begin with the most recent New York Fashion Week. Stylishly blended information and entertainment. A word-of-mouth hit in hardcover; now in trade paperback and NOOK Book.

Publishers Weekly
Starred Review.

Gunn (Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work) is best known for his role as the kind but frank mentor on the reality show Project Runway. Rich with photos, this book combines Gunn's signature brand of sassy wisdom with a smart and entertaining journey through the history of fashion-no item in the closet is left uncovered: chapters include "Underwear: Security vs. Freedom," "Belts: Friend to Soldiers and Vixens," "Dress Shirts: Prudery and Puffery," and "Capri Pants and Shorts: The Plague on Our Nation." Gunn makes this history of fashion more than just another lesson about fabrics and dyes-for him, it's the people and the culture that bring the items we wear into sharper focus; in fact, Gunn states that "the primary purpose of this book is to give your clothes more significance." In addition to his fun and informative survey of the past, Gunn doles out sage advice for the present, with sidebars devoted to helping determine the proper bra fit, listing the various categories of shorts, and explaining the proper way to shop for pants. Numerous cultural tidbits, fantastic images, and sartorial wisdom from one of fashion's most respected gurus make this a must-read for "everyone who gets dressed in the morning, not just an elite crew in Manhattan." Photos & illus.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

From the Publisher
"Tim Gunn is fun and chatty, but most of all he is incredibly knowledgable and informed!"
—Diane von Furstenberg

“Tim Gunn’s Fashion Bible is a must-have for discerning fashionistas. Not only is it packed with fun facts from the whole of fashion history, but it is a rollicking good read and, in many places, laugh-out-loud funny. Gunn combines acerbic wit with disarming charm—a rare combination—such that we don’t realize how much we learn from the book. Beware: he may be unforgiving when it comes to a favorite style—but you can’t help feeling he’s right.”
—Kathryn Earle, Head of Visual Arts Publishing at Bloomsbury

“Rich with photos, this book combines Gunn's signature brand of sassy wisdom with a smart and entertaining journey through the history of fashion—no item in the closet is left uncovered…. Gunn makes this history of fashion more than just another lesson about fabrics and dyes—for him, it's the people and the culture that bring the items we wear into sharper focus; in fact, Gunn states that "the primary purpose of this book is to give your clothes more significance." …. Numerous cultural tidbits, fantastic images, and sartorial wisdom from one of fashion's most respected gurus make this a must-read for "everyone who gets dressed in the morning, not just an elite crew in Manhattan."
Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

Saturday Evening Post
"[Gunn's] expertise is very up to the minute, and while this book is a valuable guide for today, it will also reflect well historically on our current styles in decades to come."
Library Journal
Is wore them as the latter, then they were adopted by counterculture icons. Lamenting the rise of casual athletic wear for every occasion, Gunn exhorts Americans to use the past as inspiration for developing a personal style. VERDICT Gunn acknowledges that there are more academic treatments of this subject available; his history is explicitly meant for general readers. A chatty, popular fashion history, this book is great fun and best for those interested in an introduction to the past lives of what we wear.—Lindsay M. King, Yale Univ. Lib., New Haven, CT
Kirkus Reviews
Fashion history meets style guide in the latest from the Project Runway mentor. Gunn (Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work, 2010, etc.) combines his signature style advice with a history of common items of clothing. Garment by garment, the author explains the development and significance of each, showing readers how what was once essential is now unnecessary (gloves as daily wear) and what was now unthinkable is now commonplace (denim as a back-to-school staple). Gunn is deeply knowledgeable about American sportswear and introduces readers to designers, such as Claire McCardell (1905–1958), who deserve more recognition for their contributions to fashion. The scope is intentionally narrow; the author limits his analysis to Western fashion, and though he supplies unobtrusive footnotes, he does not provide an exhaustively scholarly perspective. Instead, he admonishes both women ("[leggings] are not an alternative to actual pants") and men ("let's talk about pleats. I maintain: never") in his signature voice; helpful diagrams and illustrations are included, as is an appendix designed to help readers evaluate their own wardrobes. The chapter on dresses, in which Gunn distinguishes between draped "Helen" dresses and tailored "Cleopatra" dresses, is outstanding. The author manages to seamlessly integrate his style advice and the historical material, an accomplishment not always duplicated throughout the book. Nevertheless, the book charms even when disorganized, and it's the closest most readers will get to a lunch date with the dishy author. Zingy and opinionated, this romp through the development of American fashion gives readers a historical perspective with which to view their closets.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451643862
  • Publisher: Gallery Books
  • Publication date: 9/3/2013
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 161,725
  • Product dimensions: 7.18 (w) x 8.76 (h) x 0.84 (d)

Meet the Author

Tim Gunn

Beloved pop culture icon Tim Gunn is best known as co-host of the twelve-time Emmy-nominated reality show Project Runway. He also hosted two seasons of his own Bravo makeover series, Tim Gunn’s Guide to Style.

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Read an Excerpt

Introduction

WHY A HISTORY OF WESTERN FASHION?

WE ALL HAVE an intuitive sense of what clothes mean. When you walk into a room or down the street, even without thinking about it, you immediately take note of clothing clues and judge the wearers accordingly. You can usually tell at a glance whether a person is rich, poor, or somewhere in the middle. Often, you can even guess what someone does for a living—the messenger with his pants legs rolled up, the businessman in his suit.

And yet, it’s rare that people think about what their own clothes signify about their place in the world or their priorities. Clothes are self-expression. If you have a limited range of outfits—say, only capri pants and T-shirts—it’s as though you have a limited range of words in your vocabulary.

While many historians concern themselves with the dress of indigenous civilizations, the work of certain designers, or with very specific periods in fashion, I am most interested in the clothes we wear right here and now and how various looks came into vogue. My focus in this book is on Western fashion, with a particular emphasis on America. I will look, piece by piece, at the items most Americans have in their closets and ask, “Do you know where this garment comes from—before Old Navy?”

This old thing?, you may think.

My answer is yes. Even that ratty band T-shirt has a fascinating history that goes back far before the Steel Wheels tour. While American fashion is often vilified as sloppy or as the poor relation of Parisian couture, I find it full of surprises, beauty, and history. And I love exploring the ways in which and the reasons why clothing changes over time.

Before writing this book, I considered myself to be something of a fashion expert. I was an educator for twenty-nine years, during which I loved learning as much as I loved teaching. And yet, while working on this book, my learning curve has so profoundly accelerated and my body of knowledge has so increased that I feel as though I’ve gone through graduate school again! The research required was simultaneously daunting and exhilarating. Every day brought exclamations of surprise and wonder.

Marie Antoinette, wife of Louis the XVI, in a gown that typified the excess of the French court.

For example, I have always maintained that fashion is all about context—societal, cultural, historic, economic, and political. But even I was shocked by what a massive fashion shift occurred during the French Revolution. The sumptuous gowns during the reigns of Louis XIV, XV, and XVI became so dazzlingly vast and the wigs and headdresses so loftily high that architecture, interiors, and furniture all had to be reimagined. Then, in a moment, these dramatic silhouettes suddenly vanished, along with the royal court. In their place were dresses so basic that they resembled the simplest of nightgowns. These unbleached cotton garments had no infrastructure and no embellishments. It just goes to show: fashion and history are inextricably linked!

Why is it, you may ask, that the lion’s share of fashion history books examine fashion in the Western world? The answer is simple: for centuries clothing in the Western world has changed and evolved, while clothing in the East has remained unchanged. The Indian sari; the Chinese cheongsam, or qipao; the Korean hanbok; the Japanese kimono have all stayed the same for thousands of years. Their evolution is in the textile. The kimono, for example, is belted with an obi that must be 12 inches wide and 4.38 yards long. How’s that for prescriptive?

There are many examples of beautiful clothes in these parts of the world, and their histories are also fascinating, but there isn’t the same level of evolution. For this same reason, I’ll also put aside discussion of the European folk tradition. Regional peasant clothing is remarkable in its consistency. There is a Bronze Age clay figurine found in Romania of a woman whose costume bears an uncanny resemblance to a Bulgarian folk costume worn in the early twentieth century. That’s thirty-five hundred years in which the dress barely changed!1 But it’s a dead end for us if we’re talking about how fashion evolved to where we are today.

When you think, by contrast, about what happened to the toga, it’s pretty mind-blowing. The toga was just a piece of cloth that you draped around your body to preserve your modesty. The original toga was floor-length, and it was the apparel of the aristocracy. Wealthy Greeks and Romans wore it when gliding around rooms.

Outside, the ground was filthy, so the toga became shorter once Romans started to wear it beyond their marble-floored villas. Then, of course, people noticed that the bottom half of the garment became dirtier more quickly than the top, so the toga eventually evolved into separates . . . and today into both modern sportswear and the wrap dress.

In the 1920s, the drapiness of the ancient toga returned for the first time in centuries (although not usually as explicitly as in this 1920 photograph!).

When I take students to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, I love to lead them through the museum chronologically, because that way they come to understand the evolution of ideas. Even more exciting: they start to anticipate what may come next. Everything comes from somewhere, for some purpose. That’s why I love Renaissance painting. Every element has meaning, from a sparrow to a lily. And that’s true of fashion, too.

In this book I will guide you age by age through fashion’s evolution from cavemen’s animal hides to the latest runway collections. Just as my students cheer when paintings with perspective emerge in the Met’s collection, I hope this book’s readers will gasp as they see how Saxon underwear begat the cargo capri pant (and why that’s the worst fashion trend in America today), or how the traditional Roman sandal, strapped up the leg to stay on in the heat of battle, evolved into the flip-flop worn by nearly every twenty-first-century college student.

High, narrow heels, by contrast, have always signified wealth—there’s no need to walk anywhere if you’re of such a high class that you are carried around in a sedan chair or—in modern times—a car. You can wear Jimmy Choos when you’re just stepping out of the back of a limo and onto a red carpet and don’t need to worry about getting your heel stuck in sidewalk gratings or cracks. In the 1990s, we had chunky heels, partly because it was not as fashionable to be rich during the grunge era.

Things happen for a reason and only have staying power for a reason. Some fashion historians argue that every change in fashion reflects a focus on a new erogenous zone and that changes in necklines and hemlines stem from a desire to stave off sexual boredom.

Fashion innovations vanish quickly if they aren’t sustainable—some garments return, some die out completely, and some never seem to leave at all. As I write this, some of the hippest young people in Brooklyn are running around in little tunic rompers nearly identical to those worn by soldiers in ancient Greece. Both groups value the freedom of movement such a garment provides, even if one is running on a battlefield and the other is scampering off to an indie rock show.

Jayne Mansfield shows off her high heels. A craze for clear shoes brought about the invention of sandal-foot—or sheer-toe and heel—panty hose.

And yet, most people are unaware of our nation’s political history—much less its fashion legacy. We’re living in a woefully a-historical age. Often when I asked my students at Parsons to tell me when World War II was, no one could. It’s especially galling that so few young designers know about American fashion history because there aren’t even very many years to learn about! Until World War II, we were a nation of copiers. During the war, we couldn’t copy from Europe, because the couture houses had closed. Along came American innovators like Claire McCardell and Norman Norell, representing two different aesthetics—sportswear and evening wear, respectively—and American creativity in fashion was born. The 1940s weren’t that long ago, but even fashion students at some of the best schools are ignorant of what a huge shift occurred in the field during that era.

Meanwhile, I could frequently tell which students had no historical sense simply by looking at how derivative their designs were. They kept thinking they were inventing the wheel with every new design because they hadn’t bothered to inform themselves that the wheel already had a long and happy history. This situation always reminds me of the Phoenicians. They made reproductions of Egyptian and Greek art, but they couldn’t read hieroglyphs, so the writing they reproduced was all gibberish. They’d never seen a chariot in real life, so the scenes they depicted on vases showed someone standing in a little cart without the horses attached. Borrowing from cultures without understanding the fundamentals can yield some pretty weird and wholly illogical perversions.

I am especially concerned that American fashion not be forgotten. Once, I met the head of a hot design school in the Netherlands, and she expressed nothing but contempt for American design—an attitude I find very offensive when espoused by Europeans and downright tragic when held by Americans. When I look through Project Runway applications, I am always struck by how few American designers are cited in the influences section. Invariably, the only designers they name are Alexander McQueen, Christian Dior, and Coco Chanel—often misspelled “Channel.” You only rarely see American designers listed. If you do, it’s usually Donna Karan. (I don’t understand why people don’t write Michael Kors—even just in their own political self-interest.)

Claire McCardell is one of the all-time great American designers.

When it comes to fashion, we clearly need to become more patriotic and defend our own country’s tradition as a worthy extension of Western fashion history. I always wonder how these people who are trying to be the “next great American fashion designer” can fail to appreciate any of the historically great American designers. I’m thinking of Pauline Trigère, Claire McCardell, Norman Norell, Bill Blass, Rudi Gernreich, Bonnie Cashin, Larry Aldrich, Geoffrey Beene . . . . The list goes on and on! Instead, many young designers I meet idolize the Antwerp Six, early-eighties graduates of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, including Dries van Noten and Ann Demeulemeester—and if people can’t spell “Chanel,” they really cannot spell “Demeulemeester.”

While I’m naming names, a quick note on terminology: there has been an assault in certain academic circles on the word “fashion.” I am unsettled by people’s dislike of the word—it’s not the other F-word! Some TV executives once suggested I use “style” instead, because “fashion” is elitist. But the elite don’t always like the word, either. A certain prestigious art school in the Northeast uses the phrase “apparel design” instead of “fashion design.” I was once on campus as part of an external review committee. In our exit interview, I told the president: “I believe the reason the program eschews the term ‘fashion’ is because this curriculum has nothing to do with fashion. It doesn’t address the marketplace. It doesn’t teach fashion history. It’s basically a dressmaking school. I was bored out of my skull. No one here is interested in innovation. Don’t you want your graduates to change the world?” (And that, dear readers, is one way to exempt yourself from future external review committees.)

I love the word “fashion.” That’s why I’m using it in the title of this book. Fashion is about change and about creating clothes within a historical context. To me, dismissing fashion as silly or unimportant seems like a denial of history and frequently a show of sexism—as if something that’s traditionally a concern of women isn’t valid as a field of academic inquiry. When the Parsons fashion department was founded in 1906, it was called “costume design,” because fashion was then a verb: to fashion. But the word “fashion” has evolved to mean something much more profound, and those who resist it seem to me to be on the wrong side of history.

American fashion designers are doing so much in spite of severe disadvantages in the global fashion world. First of all, they have always needed to make money from their work. They’re not subsidized by the textile mills, as the French are. And they haven’t enjoyed any of the design piracy protections that exist in Europe. It’s hard to be a designer in America! It takes a lot of courage and feistiness. In short: up with America; up with fashion. If I never get invited back to Europe, or to another conference on structural garment design, I can live with that.

Lastly, before I am deluged, inevitably, with mail from academics complaining that I didn’t mention a particular neckline or didn’t pay proper attention to doublet construction: this isn’t meant to be a textbook or exhaustive. Entire books have been written about what in this book are mere paragraphs. I have done my best to make sure the facts are straight, but minutiae have been eliminated. Unless you’ve read other histories of fashion, you wouldn’t believe the degree of complex detail with which authors write about the transition of a collar width from 1750 to 1753. Do we really care? Well, yes, but not that much.

I encourage anyone whose interest in fashion history is sparked by this book to educate themselves further with more-academic sources. For now, I hope you’ll enjoy this sweeping and selective look at my favorite parts of fashion history and that it will help drive home how much fun fashion, and historical inquiry, can be.

The primary purpose of this book is to give your clothes more significance. I’ve found that many people are afraid of taking a hard look at what’s in their closets, because fashion is scary to many people. It shouldn’t be. Fashion is fun and thrilling—and it’s something that concerns everyone who gets dressed in the morning, not just an elite crew in Manhattan.

I hope this fashion bible will encourage you to study your clothing and appreciate its fascinating origins. Every article means something—usually a lot of things. By exploring the meaning and history of our clothes, I hope this book will magically transform your cluttered closet into a world of wonders! To that end, I have included a work sheet at the back of the book as a guide if you’d like some suggestions for what to look for and what questions to ask. This kind of closet inventory can teach us a lot about fashion, and a lot about ourselves.

So, let’s climb into our time machine and get started!

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 2, 2012

    Fashion history by the piece

    If you'd like to know how the shapes of those skirts got to be the shapes of those skirts, this is the light reading for you. If you'd like to hear Tim Gunn's entertaining opinions on the shapes of those skirts (and trousers and jackets and blouses and dresses), this is the fun book for you. I find Mr. Gunn engaging and like that he writes like he talks, so this was the book for me!

    If you want a fashion history text book or a what to wear book, this isn't it... but it's a great thing to put on the shelf next to those.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 11, 2012

    Here's the full Library Journal review since B&N can't figur

    Here's the full Library Journal review since B&N can't figure out how to post it correctly:

    ""You are part of the history of fashion," writes Project Runway's Gunn (Tim Gunn's Guide to Style) in his latest book. Indulging his professorial side-as former chair of fashion design at Parsons The New School for Design-he examines why people wear what they do and uses film stills, ads, photos, and paintings to illustrate. Gunn breezes through entertaining histories of wardrobe staples like dress shirts, jeans, sweaters, and hosiery, while dispensing plenty of opinionated but friendly what-to-wear/how-to-shop advice (No cargo capris! Try shapewear!). One chapter relates how the T-shirt jumped the underwear/outerwear divide after World War II because returning GIs wore them as the latter, then they were adopted by counterculture icons. Lamenting the rise of casual athletic wear for every occasion, Gunn exhorts Americans to use the past as inspiration for developing a personal style. VERDICT Gunn acknowledges that there are more academic treatments of this subject available; his history is explicitly meant for general readers. A chatty, popular fashion history, this book is great fun and best for those interested in an introduction to the past lives of what we wear.-Lindsay M. King, Yale Univ. Lib., New Haven, CT "

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 21, 2012

    Project Runway Addict Declares It an Enjoyable Easy Read

    Lots of interesting information and history shared in a creative manner - easy to read and fun to share and discuss. Quoted it often after reading it and went back and bought another book by Tim Gunn.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 28, 2013

    Loved it!

    It was interesting enough for me to get background but not so bogged in historical content that I was disenchanted.

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  • Posted April 1, 2013

    Taylor, OSU Comp Student, Spring 2013 If you enjoy fashion like

    Taylor, OSU Comp Student, Spring 2013

    If you enjoy fashion like I do then you will definitely enjoy this book. Tim Gunn talks about the saga of everything fashion.
    He really reveals a lot about the history of clothing and accurately answers any questions that you have about anything in your closet.
    He continuously talks about how everything in your closet has meaning and its more than just clutter.
    Before reading this book I just thought of my clothes as basic material that I collected, but now I see they mean more than just that.
    I would recommend this book to anyone who loves fashion or anyone who is merely interested in the history of the clothes in their closet.

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  • Posted February 22, 2013

    A fun book, had me laughing half the time. Tim always gives good

    A fun book, had me laughing half the time. Tim always gives good advice and this book is also full of hilarious moments in fashion history. He really hates jeggings and fanny packs so do not wear either of those while reading!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    Great Read

    Love the way Tim Gunn writes; it is informative, funny and he sure has his very own style.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    OH My gosh, TIM you've done it again

    I loved this book, and most anything Tim Gunn Writes. I think he treats dress exactly as it should be, and takes America to task when need be. He is very American in his fashion tastes without disdain for the fashion houses that got us here. His history on the various garments we were, will delight a true fashionista. Keep em' comin' Tim.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2012

    Awesome

    Nice book with fashion tips. Totally recommend :)

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  • Posted November 20, 2012

    Great Read

    I enjoy the writing style of Tim Gunn. a very interesting read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2012

    Inooii

    Njunnkkppppp bjnnbbb

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted October 16, 2012

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    Posted November 26, 2012

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