Tim [Expanded Edition]

( 2 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Moving to a major label was inevitable for the Replacements: they garnered too much acclaim and attention after Let It Be to stay on Twin/Tone, especially as the label faced the same distribution problems that plagued many indies in the mid-'80s -- plus, the 'Mats' crosstown rivals, Hüsker Dü, made the leap to the big leagues, paving the way for their own hop over to Sire. The Replacements may have left Twin/Tone behind but they weren't quite ready to leave Minneapolis in the dust, choosing to record in their hometown with Tommy Erdelyi -- aka Tommy Ramone -- who gives the 'Mats a big, roomy sound without quite giving them gloss; compared to Let It Be, Tim is ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Moving to a major label was inevitable for the Replacements: they garnered too much acclaim and attention after Let It Be to stay on Twin/Tone, especially as the label faced the same distribution problems that plagued many indies in the mid-'80s -- plus, the 'Mats' crosstown rivals, Hüsker Dü, made the leap to the big leagues, paving the way for their own hop over to Sire. The Replacements may have left Twin/Tone behind but they weren't quite ready to leave Minneapolis in the dust, choosing to record in their hometown with Tommy Erdelyi -- aka Tommy Ramone -- who gives the 'Mats a big, roomy sound without quite giving them gloss; compared to Let It Be, Tim is polished, but compared to many American underground rock records of the mid-'80s (including those by the Ramones), it's loose and kinetic. The production -- guitars that gained muscle, drums and vocals that gained reverb -- is the biggest surface difference, but there aren't just changes in how the Replacements sound; what they're playing is different too, as Paul Westerberg begins to turn into a self-aware songwriter. A large part of the charm of Let It Be was how it split almost evenly between ragged vulgarity and open-hearted rockers, with Westerberg's best songs betraying a startling, beguiling lack of affect. That's not quite the case with Tim, as Westerberg consciously writes alienation anthems: the rallying cry of "Bastards of Young" and the college radio love letter "Left of the Dial," songs written with a larger audience in mind -- not a popular audience, but a collection of misfits across the nation, who huddled around Westerberg's raw, twitchy loneliness on "Swingin Party" and "Here Comes a Regular," or the urgent and directionless "Hold My Life." These songs are Westerberg at his confessional peak, but instead of undercutting this ragged emotion or hiding it away, as he did on the Twin/Tone albums, he pairs it with the exuberance of "Kiss Me on the Bus" -- an adolescent cousin to "I Will Dare" -- and channels his smart-ass comments into the terrifically cynical rockabilly shuffle "Waitress in the Sky." All this eats up so much oxygen that there's not much air left for any of the recklessness of the Twin/Tone LPs: there's no stumbling, no throwaway jokes, with even the twin rave-ups of "Dose of Thunder" and "Lay It Down Clown" straightened out, no matter how much Bob Stinson might try to pull them apart, which is perhaps the greatest indication that the Replacements were no longer the band they were just a couple years ago. Some 'Mats fans never got over this change, but something was gained in this loss: the Replacements turned into a deeper band on Tim, one that spoke, sometimes mumbled, to the hearts of losers and outcasts who lived their lives on the fringe. If Let It Be captured the spirit of the Replacements, then Tim captured their soul. [The highlight of the six bonus tracks on Rhino's expanded 2008 reissue of Tim is the first official release of the Replacements' post-Let It Be/pre-Sire session with Westerberg idol Alex Chilton as producer: there is "Nowhere Is My Home" -- the great forgotten 'Mats song of this era, getting its first CD release -- along with two early versions of "Can't Hardly Wait," a wonderful, shambolic acoustic version and a full-blown electric outtake, both deserving of their legendary status among collectors. While not quite as noteworthy, the other three tracks are all quite good: a really raucous, blisteringly loud demo of "Kiss Me on the Bus"; a simpler, straightforward alternate of "Waitress in the Sky"; and an alternate of "Here Comes a Regular," which is the second of only two takes Westerberg did of the song.]
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/23/2008
  • Label: Rhino / Rykodisc
  • UPC: 081227990213
  • Catalog Number: 513983

Album Credits

Performance Credits
The Replacements Primary Artist
Alex Chilton Background Vocals
Chris Mars Drums, Background Vocals
Paul Westerberg Guitar, Piano, Vocals
Bob Stinson Guitar
Tommy Stinson Bass Guitar
Michelle Kinney Cello
Technical Credits
Robert Longo Artwork
Thomas Erdelyi Producer
Steven Fjelstad Engineer
Peter Jesperson Liner Notes, Reissue Producer
Dave Schultz Remastering
Bob Mehr Liner Notes
Debbie DeStaffan Art Direction
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Replacements: The Sire Years (Or Should It Be The Years They Sired?)

    After The Replacements' "Let It Be" turned into a huge critical success, the Minneapolis group signed to Sire Records in 1985. They may have jumped ship from the indie label but Paul Westerberg and his band of misfits remained as unruly, untidy and unpredictable as ever. Their first album for Sire remains one of their best, "Tim", produced by Tommy Erdelyi (aka Tommy Ramone), whose ramshackle sound fits the group well. "Bastards Of Young" and "Kiss Me On The Bus" are great should-have-been-rocker-hits while "Swinging Party" and "Here Comes A Regular" are the most painful ballads Westerberg would ever write. While Westerberg's songwriting has improved dramatically, guitarist Bob Stinson is somewhat reined in here which is shame, because his wild guitar tangents gave the band genuine character. Needless to say, after this album, Bob was out. Although the expanded edition of "Let It Be" features some terrific outtakes, including an early version of "Can't Hardly Wait", which appeared on the next record.

    Many have called 1987's "Pleased To Meet Me" their best album since "Let It Be" and it probably is. The group was now reduced to a trio (though Slim Dunlap would join the band shortly after its release) and seemed to have a more devil-may-care attitude this time. It also helped that they went to Memphis and recorded this album under the auspices of Jim Dickinson and even Alex Chilton (one of Westerberg's heroes) dropped in for some production assistance. And they even returned the favor with a song called "Alex Chilton". The band's sloppy, drunken rockers sound more slovenly than ever while the acoustic "Skyway" is one of their most beautiful songs.

    As The Replacements' critical cred grew, they tried to make a more commercial sounding record in 1989, "Don't Tell A Soul". The result was perhaps their weakest-sounding record, even though it did produce their biggest single, "I'll Be You". Yet, the additional tracks reveal what an excellent record this could have been---"Birthday Gal" (which gave the album its title) and "Portland", a forlorn tune about backwoods life on the road.

    By the time "All Shook Down" was released in 1990, The Replacements were all but finished as a band. The album was pretty much a Westerberg solo album all but in name. In fact, all four of the band members appeared on only one track: "Someone Take The Wheel". Yet, there are brilliant songs on this album featuring many different guests---John Cale's mournful viola on "Sadly Beautiful", Benmont Tench's disjointed piano on "The Last" and Johnette Napolitano's roaring duet with Westerberg on "My Little Problem". The group also seemed more comfortable with producer Scott Litt (R. E. M.) than anyone else. The album also includes a sloppy three-song EP of cover tunes called "Don't Buy Or Sell, It's Crap". Fortunately, that can't be said about this record.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2008

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