Time and Space: Second Edition / Edition 2

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Overview

Surveying both historical debates and modern physics, Barry Dainton evaluates the central arguments in a clear and unintimidating way that keeps conceptual issues comprehensible to students with little scientific or mathematical training and makes the philosophy of space and time accessible to anyone trying to come to grips with the complexities of this challenging subject. With over 100 original line illustrations and a full glossary of terms, Time and Space keeps the requirements of students firmly in sight and will continue to serve as the ideal textbook for philosophy of time and space courses.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780773537477
  • Publisher: Acumen Publishing, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/15/2010
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 480
  • Sales rank: 1,247,620
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Barry Dainton is professor of philosophy at the University of Liverpool.

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Table of Contents

Preface to the second edition

Preface to the first edition

1 Preliminaries 1

1.1 Ontology: the existence of space and time 1

1.2 Questions of structure 3

1.3 Physics and metaphysics 4

1.4 Time: the great divide 6

1.5 Two frameworks 10

1.6 Matters terminological 11

2 McTaggert on time's unreality 13

2.1 Could time be unreal? 13

2.2 Change as the essence of time 13

2.3 McTaggart's A-paradox 15

2.4 Other routes to the same place 17

2.5 The nature of A-properties 18

2.6 The overdetermination problem 20

2.7 Consequences 25

3 The Black universe 27

3.1 Time without passage 27

3.2 Passage and experience 28

3.3 A-truth in a B-world 31

3.4 Another A-paradox 34

3.5 The indispensability of the A-framework 35

3.6 Questions of attitude 35

3.7 B-theories of change 38

3.8 Emergent time 41

4 Asymmetries within time 44

4.1 The direction of time 44

4.2 Content-asymmetries: a fuller picture 45

4.3 Entropy 47

4.4 The causal route 51

4.5 Causation in question 51

4.6 Time in reverse 53

4.7 Fundamental forks 55

5 Tensed time 63

5.1 Tense versus dynamism 63

5.2 Taking tense seriously 63

5.3 McTaggart revisited 65

5.4 Is tense enough? 65

6 Dynamic time 68

6.1 The Growing Block 68

6.2 Overdetermination 70

6.3 Dynamism without tense 72

6.4 The thinning tree 73

6.5 How can a block grow? 75

6.6 The eternal past 79

6.7 The varieties of Presentism 81

6.8 Solipsistic Presentism 83

6.9 Many-Worlds Presentism 84

6.10 Dynamic Presentism 87

6.11 Compound Presentism 95

7 Time and consciousness 103

7.1 The micro-phenomenology of time 103

7.2 Memory based accounts 105

7.3 The pulse theory 106

7.4 Awareness and overlap 107

7.5 The two-dimensional model 109

7.6 The overlap theory 112

7.7 The phenomenal arrow 116

7.8 Further consequences 117

8 Time travel 121

8.1 Questions of possibility and paradox 121

8.2 Misconceptions and multidimensions 122

8.3 Self-defeating loops 127

8.4 Global consistency constraints 129

8.5 Bilking 131

8.6 Quantum retroaction 133

8.7 The inexplicable 136

8.8 Voyaging in dynamic time 138

8.9 Real time 141

9 Conceptions of void 145

9.1 Space as void 145

9.2 The unseen constrainer 147

9.3 Connection in question 149

9.4 Substantivalism: a closer look 151

9.5 Relationism: a closer look 153

9.6 Two concepts of distance 158

9.7 Two conceptions of motion 161

9.8 Matters terminological 162

10 Space: the classical debate 164

10.1 The last of the magicians 164

10.2 Galileo 167

10.3 Descartes 172

10.4 Leibniz 175

10.5 The argument from indiscernibility 177

10.6 The argument from sufficient reason 178

10.7 The methodological argument 180

11 Absolute motion 182

11.1 Inertial motion 182

11.2 The argument for real inertial motions 182

11.3 The argument from inertial effects 185

11.4 Stalemate? 188

11.5 The Leibnizian response 189

11.6 The Machian response 190

11.7 The Sklar response 192

12 Motion in spacetime 194

12.1 Newtonian spacetime 194

12.2 Neo-Newtonian spacetime 197

12.3 The only reasonable view? 199

12.4 A threat vanquished 201

12.5 The charge of explanatory impotence 201

12.6 A rebuttal 203

12.7 Newtonian spacetime relationism 205

12.8 Neo-Newtonian spacetime relationism 207

12.9 Relationism redux 209

13 Curved space 213

13.1 New angles on old problems 213

13.2 Flat and curved spaces 213

13.3 The fifth postulate 218

13.4 Intrinsic curvature 222

13.5 Topology 225

13.6 Conventionalism 228

13.7 Realism versus anti-realism 231

14 Tangible space 233

14.1 Manifestations of curvature 233

14.2 The detachment thesis 235

14.3 The explanatory challenge 237

14.4 A solitary hand 240

14.5 Global structures 241

15 Spatial anti-realism 245

15.1 Foster on matter and space 245

15.2 The intrinsic and the inscrutable 246

15.3 Modes of deviancy 250

15.4 Intrinsic versus functional geometry 254

15.5 The nomological thesis 255

15.6 Nomological contingency 258

15.7 Realism rejected 259

15.8 Geometrical pluralism 262

16 Zeno and the continuum I 267

16.1 Motion and the continuum 267

16.2 Numbering the continuum 269

16.3 The "Dichotomy" 272

16.4 The paradox of plurality 275

16.5 Cantor's continuum 277

16.6 Plurality, measure and metric 280

16.7 The Dichotomy revisited 283

Appendix 285

17 Zeno and the continuum II 289

17.1 The "Arrow" 289

17.2 Velocity as intrinsic 290

17.3 The "Stadium" 294

17.4 Could our spacetime be discrete? 299

17.5 The standard continuum: basic concerns and further puzzles 301

17.6 Are more points the answer? 306

17.7 Extension as fundamental 309

18 Special relativity 313

18.1 Time, space and Einstein 313

18.2 Lightspeed 314

18.3 Compensation or revolution? 317

18.4 Simultaneity 319

18.5 Minkowski spacetime 322

19 Relativity and reality 328

19.1 Reality unconfined 328

19.2 Compatibilism 331

19.3 Time fragmented 332

19.4 Absolute simultaneity: the quantum connection 336

20 General relativity 343

20.1 The limits of STR 343

20.2 Equivalence 344

20.3 Spacetime curvature 346

20.4 Feeling the grip of spacetime 349

20.5 Evidence 351

20.6 Equations 352

20.7 Relativistic cosmology 353

21 Spacetime metaphysics 368

21.1 Substantival spacetime 368

21.2 Mach's Principle 369

21.3 The hole argument 371

21.4 Metrical essentialism 375

21.5 An outmoded debate? 379

21.6 GTR and time 381

22 Strings 387

22.1 Higher dimensions 387

22.2 Kaluza-Klein theory 390

22.3 The standard model 391

22.4 Strings 393

22.5 Calabi-Yau space 396

22.6 Branes and bulk 399

22.7 Shards 402

Notes 407

Glossary 427

Web resources 441

Bibliography 443

Index 455

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